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North 1972 ^ 

Carolina 

State 
University Bulletin 




Undergraduate Catalog 



December, 1972 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. 72 DECEMBER 1972 NUMBER 4 

Published four times a year in February, June, August and December by North Carolina State 
University. Department of Admissions, Peele Hall, P.O. Box 5126, Raleigh, N.C. 27607. Second class 
postage paid at Raleigh, N.C. 27611. 

Maxine F. Shane. University Catalog Editor; Joseph S. Hancock, Assistant Director, Publications; 
Hardy D. Berry, Director, Information Services. Photography by North Carolina State University 
Visual Aids. Published by the North Carolina State University Print Shop. Cover by Ralph Mills. 




North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Undergraduate Catalog 

1972-74 






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North Carolina State University's central campus includes 120 buildings on 596 
acres, although the University has 88,000 acres. From here the University carries 
out its three major functions — research, extension and academic affairs. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

October 8, 1972 
Sixteen Constituent Institutions 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Raymond Howard Dawson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President — Academic Affairs 

Harold Delaney, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President — Student Services and Special 

Programs 
Herman Brooks James, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President — Research and Public 

Service 
L. Felix Joyner, A. B., Vice President — Finance 
Cameron P. West, A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Vice President — Planning 
George Eldridge Bair, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of -Educational Television 
James L. Jenkins, Jr., A.B., Assistant to the President 
John P. Kennedy, Jr., S.B., B.A., M.A., J.D., Secretary of the University 
Arnold Kimsey King, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant to the President 
Richard H. Robinson, Jr., A.B., LL.B., Assistant to the President 
Alexander Hurlbutt Shepard, Jr., M.A., Assistant Vice President — Finance and 

Treasurer 
J. Lem Stokes, II, A.B., M.Div., Ph.D., Associate Vice President — Academic Affairs 

The University of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors to 
students in 1795. It has been governed by a Board of Trustees chosen by the Legis- 
lature and presided over by the Governor. During the period 1917-1972, the Board 
consisted of 100 elected members and a varying number of ex-officio members. 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931, without change of name, it was merged 
with The North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro and The North Carolina 
State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh to form a multicampus 
institution designated The University of North Carolina. 

In 1963 the General Assembly changed the name of the campus at Chapel Hill to 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and that at Greensboro to The 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro and, in 1965, the name of the campus at 
Raleigh to North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Charlotte College was added as The University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 
1965, and, in 1969, Asheville-Biltmore College and Wilmington College became The 
University of North Carolina at Asheville and The University of North Carolina at 
Wilmington respectively. 

A revision of the North Carolina State Constitution adopted in November 1970, 
included the following: "The General Assembly shall maintain a public system of 
higher education, comprising The University of North Carolina and such other 
institutions of higher education as the General Assembly may deem wise. The 
General Assembly shall provide for the selection of trustees of The University of 
North Carolina . . ." In slightly different language, this provision had been in the 
Constitution since 1868. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly in special session merged, without 
changing their names, the other 10 state-supported senior institutions into the 
University as follows: Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, 
Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina 
Agricultural and Technical State University, North Carolina Central University, 
North Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke State University, Western Carolina 
University, and Winston-Salem State University. This merger became effective on 
July 1, 1972. 



The Board of Trustees became the Board of Governors and the number was 
reduced to 35 members (32 after July 1, 1973) elected by the General Assembly. It 
is "responsible for the general determination, control, supervision, management, 
and governance of all affairs of the constituent institutions." However, each con- 
stituent institution has a local board of trustees of 13 members, eight of whom are 
appointed by the Board of Governors, four by the Governor, and one, the elected 
president of the student body, whose principal powers are exercised under a delega- 
tion from the Board of Governors. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed by a 
chancellor as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and appropriate 
allocation of function are effected by the Board of Governors and by the President 
with other administrative officers of the University. The General Administration 
office is located in Chapel Hill. 

The chancellors of the constituent institutions are responsible to the President as 
the chief administrative and executive officer of The University of North Carolina. 



CONTENTS 



The University 9 

Programs of Study 11 

Admissions 14 

Registration 18 

Tuition and Fees 19 

Financial Aid 21 

Student Housing 23 

Academic Regulations 37 

The D.H. Hill Library 44 

General Information 46 

Student Activities 49 

University Calendar 55 

Schools and Programs of Study 60 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 63 

Design 119 

Education 129 

Engineering 143 

Forest Resources 179 

Liberal Arts 195 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences 209 

Textiles 225 

University Studies 237 

Graduate School 237 

Division of Continuing Education 237 

Summer Sessions 239 

Computing Center 240 

Military Education and Training 240 

Course Descriptions 245 

Administration and Faculty 485 

Administrative Council 485 

Board of Trustees 485 

Board of Governors 486 

Teaching and Professional Faculty 487 

Alumni Association 578 

Foundations and Development 579 

University Disruptions Policy and Procedures 580 

Index 585 

Campus Map 




Harrelson Hall, North Carolina State University's round classroom building is an im- 
portant instructional center with the D. H. Hill Library (foreground) and residence halls 
(tri-dorm area) conveniently located. 



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North Carolina State University 
Administration and Offices 



Chancellor 

John Tyler Caldwell 
Academic Affairs 

Harry C. Kelly, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost 
University Extension 

William L. Turner, Vice Chan- 
cellor for Extension and Public 
Service 
Research 

Earl G. Droessler, Administrative 
Dean 
International Programs 

Jackson A. Rigney, Dean 
Graduate School 

Walter J. Peterson, Dean 
Business Affairs 

John D. Wright, Vice Chancellor, 
Finance and Business 
Foundations and Development 

Rudolph Pate, Director 
Information Services 

Hardy D. Berry, Director 
School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences 
J. E. Legates, Dean 
Edward W. Glazener, Director, 

Academic Affairs 
George Hyatt Jr., Director, 

Extension 
J. C. Williamson Jr., Director, 
Research 
School of Design 

Claude E. McKinney, Dean 
School of Education 

Carl J. Dolce, Dean 
School of Engineering 
Ralph E. Fadum, Dean 
Robert G. Carson Jr., Associate 

Dean for Academic Affairs 
Henry B. Smith, Associate Dean for 

Graduate Studies and Research 
John R. Canada, Assistant Dean for 
Extension 
School of Forest Resources 
Eric L. Ellwood, Dean 
Leroy C. Saylor, Assistant Dean 
School of Liberal Arts 

Robert O. Tilman, Dean 
William B. Toole, Assistant Dean 
School of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences 
Arthur C. Menius, Dean 



Jasper D. Memory, Assistant Dean 
School of Textiles 

David W. Chaney, Dean 
Library 

Isaac T. Littleton, Director 

Student Affairs Division 
Banks C. Talley Jr., Dean 
Henry Bowers, Associate Dean 
Gerald G. Hawkins, Associate Dean 
Norbert B. Watts, Associate Dean 

Ad?nissions 

Kenneth D. Raab, Director 

Student Activities 
Carolyn Jessup, Dean 

Student Development and Residence 
Life 

Wilbur F. Weston, Dean 
Residence Facilities 

Roger W. Fisher, Director 
Music Activities 

J. Perry Watson, Director 
Religious Affairs 

Oscar B. Wooldridge, Coordinator 
Student Affairs Research 

Thomas H. Stafford, Director 
University Student Center 

Henry Bowers, Director 
International Student Affairs 

Philip F. Weaver, Foreign Student 
Adviser 
Career Planning and Placement 
Center 

Raymond E. Tew, Director 
Counseling Center 

Lyle B. Rogers, Director 
Financial Aid 

Carl O. Eycke, Financial Aid Officer 
Registration and Records 

James H. Bundy, Registrar 
Thompson Theater 

John C. Andrews, Director 

Student Health Services 
Harry Fagan, Director 

Alumni Affairs 

Bryce C. Younts, Director 
Athletics 

Willis R. Casey, Director 
Physical Plant 

J. McCree Smith, Director 
Students Supply Store 

Mark H. Wheless, General Manager 







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North Carolina State University 

North Carolina State University is a large and complex state university, one 
of the major state universities of the nation. 

It shares the distinctive character of Land-Grant state universities nationally 
— broad academic offerings, extensive public involvement, national and inter- 
national activities, and large-scale extension and research programs. 

State was founded as a Land-Grant state university under terms of the 
famed federal Morrill Act of 1862 which provided for public land endowments 
to support a college in each state. 

The Land-Grant heritage of fulfilling three major functions — research, 
extension and academic affairs — is reflected in the large dimensions of these 
functions at North Carolina State University. 

The rich and varied academic program of the University is comprised of 
some 70 bachelors of arts and science programs, 62 master's degree fields and 
41 doctoral degrees. 

Its research activities span a broad spectrum of about 700 scientific, tech- 
nologic and scholarly endeavors, with a budget of over $20 million annually. 

Extension programs of the University are similarly diverse and include 
urban affairs, marine sciences, environmental protection, engineering indus- 
trial and textiles extension, agricultural extension and many others. 

The annual University budget is about $80 million. The University has 4,600- 
plus employees. There are 1,597 faculty and professional staff and 157 adjunct 
and federal agency faculty, including 932 graduate faculty. 

There are 120 campus buildings with an estimated value of about $120,- 
000,000. 

The central campus is 596 acres, though the University has 88,000 acres, 
including one research and endowment forest of 78,000 acres. Research farms; 
biology and ecology sites; genetics, horticulture, and floriculture nurseries; 
and Carter Stadium areas near the main campus comprise about 2,500 acres. 

Principal operational locations for the University in North Carolina are 
the Marine Sciences Center at Wilmington, the Fisheries Laboratory at 
Hatteras, the Minerals Industries Laboratory at Asheville, the Pamlico Marine 
Laboratory at Aurora, and the 20 agricultural research stations and forests. 

North Carolina State University is one of the three Research Triangle Uni- 
versities along with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. In the 30-mile triangle formed by the three Universities is the 
5,000-acre Research Triangle Park, the Research Triangle Institute, a Uni- 
versities' subsidiary, and the Triangle Universities Computation Center, a 
central facility for the extensive computing centers of the institutions. 

The University's total enrollment is about 13,800. There are 11,250 under- 
graduates, 2,270 graduate students and about 300 other students. Students at 
State come from all 50 states and some 60 other countries. The international 
enrollment is a distinctive feature of the institution since its 480 international 
students give it a decidedly cosmopolitan aura. 

North Carolina State University is organized in eight schools and the 
Graduate School. The eight schools are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, 
Education, Engineering, Forest Resources, Liberal Arts, Physical and Mathe- 
matical Sciences and Textiles. In addition, a complex of divisions and programs 
provide for a wide range of special programs in academic affairs, research and 
extension. 

State is one of 118 recognized members of the National Association of State 
Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. It is also a member of the American 



Council on Education, the College Entrance Examination Board, the Council 
of Graduate Schools in the United States, the National Commission on Ac- 
crediting, and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 

The University is accredited by national and regional accrediting agencies 
applicable to the University and its numerous professional fields. 

In the fall of 1972, 65 percent of the entering freshmen were in the top one- 
quarter of their high school graduating classes. A total of 93 percent were in 
the top half of their classes. About 88 percent of all applicants are accepted. 
The average combined SAT score for the entering freshmen in 1972 was 1040. 

Typically, the ratio of men and women students on the campus, including all 
graduate students and special students, is about three to one. In the fall of 
1972, the Registrar's Office listed 10,709 male and 3,100 female students. 

About one-third of the total student body consists of new students each fall. 
There were more than 4,000 in the semester this catalog was prepared. These 
include 2,190 freshmen, 441 special students, 736 transfer students, 58 un- 
classified students and 644 students who entered for graduate studies. 

State has been heavily oriented to scientific and technological areas, illus- 
trated by the designation of its schools. However, in the decade of the 1960's 
the rapid rise of the School of Liberal Arts and the quality of faculties in social 
sciences and humanities has given the University a typical major university 
character. 

The largest schools are engineering and liberal arts. Engineering has an 
enrollment of 3,100 and liberal arts of just under 3,000. 

With its 2,300 courses, students have the opportunity to concentrate in a 
broad range of studies. The new multi-disciplinary program in liberal arts 
permits students to design their own courses of study. The Division of Uni- 
versity Studies offers courses of special interest to all students — courses deal- 
ing with environmental and ecological problems, the world armament problem, 
and the world population crisis. 



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PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The 2,300 courses offered by North Carolina State University give students 
an unusual range of choices in degree curricula, special fields of study, degree 
options, and specialized concentrations. 

Programs of study range from the new multidisciplinary studies program 
in Liberal Arts, in which students may design their own course of study 
under the supervision of a faculty committee, to the highly specialized sciences 
and technologies in engineering and biological sciences. 

The 2,300 courses provide the bases for the bachelors, masters and doctoral 
degrees of the University but they also may be combined in sequences and 
concentrations to establish numerous other programs of study suiting the 
student's interests. 

The wide variety of academic programs is indicated by the following listing 
of current programs of study: 



Accounting 

Aerospace Engineering 

Agriculture 

Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Education 

Agricultural Institute 

Agronomy 

Animal Science 

Architecture 

Biochemistry 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Biological Science 

Botany 

Business 

Ceramic Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemistry 

Civil Engineering 

Computer Science 

Conservation 

Construction 

Criminal Justice and 

Police Services 
Crop Science 
Economics 
Education 

Electrical Engineering 
Engineering Mechanics 
Engineering Operations 
English 
Entomology 
Environmental Design 
Fisheries Option 
Food Science 
Forestry 
French 



Furniture Manufacturing & 

Management 
Geology 
History 

Horticultural Science 
Human Resources Development 
Industrial Arts Education 
Industrial Education 
Industrial Engineering 
International Option 
Landscape Architecture 
Liberal Arts (General) 
Marine Sciences 
Materials Engineering 
Mathematics 
Mathematics Education 
Mechanical Engineering 
Medical Technology 
Meteorology 
Microbiology 
Multidisciplinary Studies 
Nuclear Engineering 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Plant Protection 
Politics 

Poultry Science 
Pre-Dental 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre- Veterinary 
Product Design 
Psychology 

Pulp and Paper Science 
Recreation and Park Admin. 
Recreation Management 

(Natural Resources) 



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Rural Sociology Technical Education 

Science Education Textile Chemistry 

Sociology Textile Technology 

Soil Science Visual Design 

Social Studies Vocational-Industrial Education 

Spanish Wildlife Biology 

Speech-Communication Wood Science and Technology 

Statistics Zoology 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

Bachelor's degrees of: 

environmental design in architecture, environmental design in land- 
scape architecture and environmental design in product design. 

Bachelor of Science degrees in: 
Agriculture and Life Sciences 

(Business) — agricultural economics, animal science, crop science, horticul- 
tural science, poultry science and soil science; 

(Science) — agricultural economics, animal science, biological and agricul- 
tural engineering, botany, conservation, crop science, entomology, food 
science, horticultural science, medical technology, plant protection, 
poultry science, rural sociology, soil science, wildlife biology and zoology 
(also preveterinary) ; 

(Technology) — agronomy, animal science, biological and agricultural engi- 
neering, food science, horticultural science and poultry science; (Bio- 
logical Sciences) — biological sciences. 

Education 

agricultural education, vocational industrial education, technical education, 
mathematics education, industrial arts education and science education. 

Engineering 

aerospace, chemical, civil, (construction option), electrical, industrial, 
materials, mechanical and nuclear engineering; engineering mechanics, 
engineering operations; and furniture manufacturing and management. 

Forest Resources 

forestry, conservation, pulp and paper science and technology, natural 
resource recreation management, recreation and park administration, 
wood science and technology. 

Liberal Arts 

economics, English, history, politics and philosophy. 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics, physics, statistics. 

Textiles 

textile chemistry and textile technology. 

Bachelor of Arts degrees in: 

Education 

psychology. 

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Liberal Arts 

economics, English, French, Spanish, history, politics, philosophy, 
sociology, speech-communication, multi-disciplinary major in Liberal 
Arts. 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences 
geology. 

Professional degrees (fifth year) in: 

chemical engineer, civil engineer, electrical engineer, industrial engineer, 
materials engineer, mechanical engineer and nuclear engineer. 

GRADUATE DEGREES 

Master's degrees of: 

adult and community college education, agricultural education, agricul- 
ture, applied mathematics, architecture, biological and agricultural 
engineering, biomathematics, chemical engineering, civil engineering, 
economics, electrical engineering, engineering mechanics, forestry, 
guidance and personnel services, industrial arts education, industrial 
engineering, landscape architecture, life sciences, mathematics, mathe- 
matics education, mechanical engineering, product design, public affairs, 
recreation resources, sociology, science education, statistics, technology 
for international development, textile technology, urban design, vocational 
industrial education, wildlife biology, wood and paper science. 

Master of Arts programs in: 

economics, English, history, and politics. 

Master of Science programs in: 

adult and community college education, agricultural education, agricul- 
tural economics, animal science, applied mathematics, biochemistry, 
biological and agricultural engineering, biomathematics, botany, chemical 
engineering, chemistry, civil engineering, crop science, electrical engi- 
neering, engineering mechanics, entomology, food science, forestry, genet- 
ics, geology, guidance and personnel services, horticultural science, 
industrial arts education, industrial engineering, marine sciences, 
materials engineering, mathematics, mathematics education, mechanical 
engineering, microbiology, nuclear engineering, nutrition, operations 
research, physics, physiology, plant pathology, poultry science, psychology, 
recreation resources administration, rural sociology, science education, 
soil science, statistics, textile chemistry, textile technology, vocational 
industrial education, wildlife biology, wood and paper science, and 
zoology. 

Doctor of Philosophy programs in: 

animal science, applied mathematics, biochemistry, biological and 
agricultural engineering, biomathematics, botany, chemical engineering, 
chemistry, civil engineering, crop science, economics, electrical engineer- 
ing, engineering mechanics, entomology, fiber and polymer science, food 
science, forestry, genetics, horticultural science, industrial engineering, 
marine sciences, materials engineering, mathematics, mathematics 
education, mechanical engineering, microbiology, nuclear engineering, 
nutrition, operations research, physics, physiology, plant pathology, 
psychology, science education, sociology, soil science, statistics, wood and 
paper science, and zoology. 

13 



Doctor of Education programs in: 

adult and community college education and occupational education. 

Admissions 

Applicants for admission to the University should apply to the Director of 
Admissions by May 1 for the fall semester and by December 1 for the spring 
semester. The various admissions requirements for freshman, transfer 
students and others are discussed elsewhere in this section. Each applicant 
must complete an application form which may be obtained from high school 
counselors. 

To obtain application forms or additional information on fields of study at 
the University, contact: 

Director of Admissions 
Box 5126 

North Carolina State University 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 
A nonrefundable $10 application fee must accompany the completed appli- 
cation when it is submitted to the Director of Admissions. Students of all 
races are equally welcome at the University. 

The Admissions Office is in Peele Hall and is open every week day (except 
holidays) and on Saturdays until 12 noon. 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

The applicant normally should be a graduate of an accredited high school and 
have the recommendation of the principal. Non-graduates should usually 
have a high school equivalency certificate, the minimum high school mathe- 
matics preparation, and present other evidence of maturity and ability to deal 
effectively with college work. 

Information the University needs for admissions purposes includes: the 
high school record showing grades through the junior year, a listing of 
courses in progress in the senior year, a rank in class based on at least three 
years of high school study, scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), and 
in some instances the field of study or curriculum preferred. 

Applicants must have a freshman Predicted Grade Average (PGA) of at 
least 1.6 in addition to adequate high school preparation in order to be 
admitted. This PGA is computed using a formula which takes into considera- 
tion the student's class rank upon graduation and scores on the SAT (generally 
the SAT's should be no less than 800). The rank in class carries greater weight 
in this prediction than do the SAT scores. A 1.6 grade average is the equiva- 
lent of a "C"-minus average on a grading scale where a 4.0 is an "A" and a 
2.0 isa"C." 

Applicants are accepted on either junior or senior year SAT scores, although 
senior year scores are generally recommended, especially if the applicant is 
also applying for financial aid. An interview is not required and does not 
weigh in the admissions decision. 

North Carolina State University does not have a specific early decision 
plan for applicants now in high school. All applicants are acted upon as soon 
as complete admission credentials are received. 

FRESHMAN CLASS PROFILE 

Of the freshmen who enrolled in August, 1971, 58 percent ranked in the top 

14 



fifth and 88 percent in the top two-fifths. Four percent fell in the bottom half, 
however, they possessed outstanding SAT scores. The average SAT-Verbal 
score for this class was 500 and the average SAT-Math score, 564. 

SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST (SAT) 

Applicants for admission as freshmen must take the College Entrance 
Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that their 
scores be sent directly from the Board to North Carolina State University 
(Code No.— R5496). 

These tests are given several times a year at a number of centers throughout 
the United States and in foreign countries. Application forms and information 
booklets may be obtained from your guidance counselor or by writing: 
College Entrance Examination Board 
Box 592 

Princeton, New Jersey 08540 
Applications are due in the board office well in advance of the test dates. 
Prospective students should obtain full information early enough to assure 
that proper application for the test is made. 

ACHIEVEMENT TESTS 

The Achievement Tests are not used in the admissions decisions; however, 
certain of the schools find specific achievement tests helpful for correct place- 
ment, and in some cases college credit is given. 

Students entering the Schools of Engineering, Forest Resources, Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences, and the Mathematics and Science Education 
curricula should take the Math Level I Achievement Test. Those students 
entering programs in Liberal Arts should take the English and Foreign 
Language Tests. Those students entering the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences should take the Biology Test, and those entering the Biological 
Sciences curriculum should also take the Foreign Language Test. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Advanced placement is offered to those who are qualified to accelerate 
their studies. Three means are available for obtaining advanced placement. 
The student may take a proficiency examination in a subject when he believes 
that he has mastery of the course material. (Application for such an examina- 
tion must be made to the head of the department in which the subject is 
offered.) Secondly, advanced placement and credit is given for satisfactory 
performance on the subject matter proficiency tests of the College Entrance 
Examination Board's Advanced Placement Program. Finally, the entering 
student may be selected for an advanced section in mathematics, a foreign 
language or history on the basis of his previous academic record and his per- 
formance on the College Board aptitude and achievement tests or other exami- 
nation. In addition, based on a predicted grade in English, a student may be 
given the opportunity to enroll in English 112, the second semester of 
freshman English, during his first semester on campus. The PGE (predicted 
grade in English) is based on the high school record and SAT Verbal score. 
A "C" or better earned in English 112 would give the student a total of six 
hours of credit; three hours of credit for English 112 plus three hours of 
credit for English 111, the first semester course which was bypassed. 



15 



OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS 

Undergraduate applicants from outside North Carolina must generally 
meet higher standards than required of North Carolina residents before 
admission will be granted. North Carolina State University is limited to 
accepting not more than 15 percent of total undergraduate admissions from 
outside the State. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

North Carolina State University welcomes transfer applicants. In recent 
years more than 25 percent of our graduates started their college programs at 
other institutions. 

All transfer applicants must have an overall "C" average on all college- 
level work taken at accredited institutions and must be eligible to return to 
the last institution regularly attended. Applications of students from non- 
accredited institutions will be reviewed by the Admissions Committee. 

Work completed at technical institutes is generally not considered college 
level; after enrolling at North Carolina State University, however, students 
from such institutes may take comprehensive examinations in courses for 
which they feel their previous training qualifies them for advanced placement. 

Transfer students must present at least 28 semester hours of "C" work or 
must meet admissions requirements for entering freshmen. 

If admitted, the prospective transfer student's record will be further evaluated 
to determine the amount of credit that can be transferred and applied toward 
degree requirements at North Carolina State University. This evaluation will 
be approved by the dean of the school in which the student wishes to 
enroll. Transcripts are not evaluated however until the applicant has been 
admitted. A nonrefundable $2 transcript evaluation fee, payable to North Caro- 
lina State University, is charged for this service. 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

An unclassified student is one who has been approved for admission to a 
specific school and is earning college credit but has not chosen specific curri- 
culum. Unclassified students must meet the same admissions requirements 
as regular students. If, at a later date, an unclassified student wishes to 
change to regular status, his credits must be evaluated for his chosen 
curriculum. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

The special student classification is primarily designed for students 18 
years of age or older who are employed in the Raleigh area, housewives wishing 
to take courses for self-improvement, and other mature individuals interested 
in college courses for special reasons but who do not desire to work toward 
a degree at North Carolina State University. The usual college admissions 
requirements may be waived for qualified special students, but regular rules 
of scholarship will apply after admission. A maximum of seven hours per 
semester may be taken by students in the special classification. 

Application as a special student should be made through the Division of 
Continuing Education, Room 134, 1911 Building. If special students wish to 
change to regular status at a later date, they must make regular application 
and meet the same admissions requirements as other degree candidates. 

16 



AUDITOR 

New students desiring admission as auditors should apply through the 
Division of Continuing Education. The participation of auditors in class 
discussion and in examinations is optional with the instructor. Auditors receive 
no college credit; however, they are expected to attend classes regularly. 

USAFI CREDITS 

College-level courses offered by accredited institutions and made available 
to military personnel through the United States Armed Forces Institute will 
be considered for transfer credit if a grade of "C" or better has been earned and 
if the courses are applicable to the student's curriculum. A transcript must 
be sent to the Director of Admissions directly from the institution offering 
the course. 

TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

Any student who has received a diploma from an accredited high school or 
has passed the high school equivalency examination administered by the 
State Department of Public Instruction is eligible for consideration for the 
Agricultural Institute. Each application must be reviewed and evaluated 
by the Institute director. The application should include a copy of the appli- 
cant's high school record or a letter indicating the applicant has passed the 
equivalency examination. 

Also, the applicant must have a letter of recommendation sent to the Ad- 
missions Office by a responsible citizen, not a relative, attesting to the student's 
integrity and character. The Scholastic Aptitude Test is not required of appli- 
cants to the Agricultural Institute. 

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM 

The CLEP is designed primarily to serve the non-traditional student who 
has acquired knowledge through correspondence and University extension 
courses, educational television, adult education programs, on-the-job train- 
ing and independent study. It enables adults and unaffiliated students to 
demonstrate their knowledge and validate their learning by receiving college 
credit on the basis of examinations, as well as providing measures of college 
equivalency for use by business, industry, and organizations other than institu- 
tions of higher learning. 

There are two types of examinations: the General Examinations designed 
to provide a comprehensive measure of undergraduate achievement in five 
basic areas of Liberal Arts (English composition, mathematics, natural 
sciences, humanities, social sciences — history) and the Subject Examinations 
designed to measure achievement in specified undergraduate courses. The 
examinations are given at North Carolina State University on the third 
Saturday of each month, and candidates should register for them three weeks 
before the test date. 

Those interested in further information should write or telephone the North 
Carolina State University Counseling Center, Box 5505, 210 Peele Hall, 
Raleigh, N. C. 27607; (919) 755-2424. 

READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

To be readmitted after having withdrawn from this University or having 
been out of school for one or more semesters, the student must be academically 



17 



eligible to return and should apply to the Readmissions Office, Department of 
Registration and Records, 11 Peele Hall, for readmission at least 30 days 
prior to the date of desired enrollment. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students working toward graduate degrees or who are taking courses for 
graduate credit which are to apply ultimately to a graduate degree are enrolled 
in the Graduate School. Procedures and policies governing graduate admission 
are outlined in a special catalog issued by the Graduate School. Any student 
interested in enrolling for graduate study may obtain a copy of the 
Graduate School Catalog from: 

Dean of the Graduate School 

Peele Hall 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 



Registration 



PREREGISTRATION 

Preregistration is a procedure whereby a student meets with his or her 
adviser to discuss an academic program and to select the courses he or she will 
take during the next semester. The courses selected by each student are pro- 
cessed through the computer which assigns a day and an hour for each course 
requested. During the registration period at the beginning of each semester, 
the student is able to obtain a completed schedule. A Schedule of Courses 
booklet is available for each student every semester. This booklet contains 
all necessary instructions for completing preregistration. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration consists of three steps: (1) paying tuition and fees (preferably 
by mail), (2) completing registration forms, and (3) obtaining previously pre- 
pared class schedules. Students who register late must follow late registration 
instructions and pay the required late fees. Instructions for completing regis- 
tration and late registration are issued each semester. 

Each student is expected to complete his or her registration in person. 
Under no circumstances is a preregistered student to be considered officially 
registered until such time as the student has picked up his or her class schedule 
and completed the registration form. 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

A regularly enrolled full-time degree student at North Carolina State Uni- 
versity may take course work at one of the Raleigh colleges, at the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at the University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro or at Duke University. Interinstitutional registration form and all regis- 
tration procedures are available from the Department of Registration and 
Records. 

SCHEDULE CHANGES— DROPS AND ADDS 

Courses may be added during the first week of a regular semester; courses 
may be dropped during the first two weeks of a semester with the result that 

18 



they will not appear on the student's record. Beyond this period courses may 
be dropped as follows: 

1. During third and fourth weeks, with adviser's approval, a grade of 
"W" is recorded. 

2. Thereafter, with the recommendation of the adviser and the approval of 
the dean, for compelling reason, a grade of "W" is recorded. If the drop 
is not approved by both adviser and the dean, a grade of "FD" is re- 
corded. 

NOTE: If a student is enrolled for only one course and wishes to drop it, 
the procedure is that of withdrawal from the University. 



Tuition and Fees 

Charges for tuition and fees vary according to (1) the student's status as a 
resident or nonresident of North Carolina, (2) the number of hours for which 
one is registered, (3) the type of student (undergraduate, graduate or part-time). 
The rate schedule currently in effect is listed below although all charges are 
subject to change without notice. 

TUITION AND FEES— UNDERGRADUATES— SEMESTER RATE 
Residents of North Carolina 



Hours 

1-3 
4-6 

7 or more 



Tuition 

> 37.50 

75.00 

112.50 



Required 

Fees 

$101.00 
101.00 
101.00 



Total 

138.50 
176.00 
213.50 



Nonresidents 



Hours 



Tuition 



Required 
Fees 



Total 



1-3 $300.00 $101.00 $ 401.00 

4-6 600.00 101.00 701.00 

7 or more 900.00 101.00 1,001.00 

NOTE: A statement of tuition and fees is mailed to each student four to five 
weeks before the beginning of each semester. Full payment or com- 
plete financial assistance information must be returned with the 
statement by the indicated due date. The due date is normally one 
week before classes begin. 



RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PAYMENT 

To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resident must have maintained his 
domicile in North Carolina for at least the 12 months next preceding the date 
of first enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of higher education in 
this State. Student status in an institution of higher learning in this State 
shall not constitute eligibility for residence to qualify said student for in-state 
tuition. 

No person shall lose his in-state resident status by serving in the armed 
forces outside of the State of North Carolina. 



19 



Pint 




Second 




Semester 




Semester 


Year 


$ 112.50 


$ 


112.50 


$ 225.00 


900.00 




900.00 


1,800.00 


101.00 




101.00 


202.00 


133.00 




133.00 


266.00 


158.00 




158.00 


316.00 


337.50 




337.50 


675.00 


90.00 




90.00 


180.00 


200.00 




200.00 


400.00 


$ 974.00 


$ 


974.00 


$1,948.00 


$1,761.50 


$1,761.50 


$3,523.00 


$ 999.00 


$ 


999.00 


1,998.00 


$1,786.50 


$1,786.50 


$3,573.00 



ESTIMATED ANNUAL UNDERGRADUATE EXPENSES 



Tuition: N. C. residents 

Out-of-state residents 
*Other University fees 
Room: Men 

Women 
Board (estimated) 
Books and supplies (estimated) 
Other personal expenses (estimated) 

Men: N. C. residents 

Out-of-state residents 
Women: N. C. residents 

Out-of-state residents 

*Other University Fees. These fees are for various student services, activities, 
and building funds. They are turned over in full to the organizations or 
activities as listed below: 

Academic Fees: 

Registration, library, classroom 

and laboratory supplies, and 

equipment, etc. $ 76.00 

Nonacademic Fees: 

Medical or Infirmary Fee 20.00 

Athletic Fee 20.00 

Individual School Fee 4.00 

University Center Fee 45.00 

University Center Music Wing Fee 9.00 
Physical Education and Intramural 

Athletics 10.50 

Gymnasium Building Fee 8.00 

Student Government 1-65 

Student Publications 7.85 



Total $202.00 

NOTE: All fees are subject to change. 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

The cost for books and supplies ave variable, depending upon the courses and 
curriculum in which the student is enrolled. A reasonable estimate is $180 per 
year, but students who require drawing supplies and slide rules have an 
additional original outlay. Books and supplies are purchased directly from 
the Student Supply Stores. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Applicants interested in graduate work may receive a schedule of fees upon 
application to the Graduate School. 



20 



PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS 

Students in the various fifth-year professional curricula will be charged 
on the same basis as undergraduate students. 

APPLICATION FEE 

A nonrefundable application of $10 must accompany each application for 
admission. Transfer students pay $12; the additional $2 is a transcript 
evaluation fee. 

TUITION ADVANCE DEPOSIT 

Complete information regarding the tuition advance deposit will be in- 
cluded in the acceptance letter. 

REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES 

A student who withdraws from school on or before the first two weeks of a 
semester will receive a refund of the full amount paid less an enrollment fee. 
After that period, refunds may be obtained only by submitting a petition to the 
Refund of Fees Committee. 

REFUND OF FEES COMMITTEE 

The Committee endeavors to protect the rights of the student and the Uni- 
versity and is empowered to approve a petition when the withdrawal is caused 
by extensive illness, by military orders, or by other circumstances that 
justify waiving the rules. The petition forms can be obtained at the Counseling 
Center, 210 Peele Hall. 

Financial Aid 

Entering students may gain consideration for all types of assistance by 
obtaining Parents' Confidential Statement forms from their high schools, 
having their parents complete the forms and submitting them to the College 
Scholarship Service in Princeton, New Jersey, preferably before February 1, 
of the year of expected fall enrollment. The Financial Aid Office at North 
Carolina State University receives from College Scholarship Service a copy of 
the Parents' Confidential Statement and a financial need analysis report for 
each applicant. These data aid in determining the amount of assistance to be 
offered by the University. 

Awards are made to applicants on the basis of financial need, good citizen- 
ship and admission to the University. These awards usually offer combina- 
tions of scholarship or grant, loan and/or work-study job, depending upon 
the degree of need. 

Upperclassmen must apply for financial aid each year, preferably by 
February 1. By one application the student receives consideration for all 
the available types of financial assistance for which he is eligible, including 
scholarships, loans and work assignments. Continuing students must have a 
satisfactory record of achievement and citizenship. Aid is made available on 
a nondiscriminatory basis to all qualifying students. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarship awards are competitive and are given to those applicants 

21 



who most nearly meet the selection criteria specified by each scholarship. 
In addition to the criteria of high academic potential and achievement, good 
character and financial need, many awards have curricular, geographic or 
other restrictions or preference specifications. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS 

This federally funded gift assistance is restricted to undergraduate students 
from low-income families. Annual grants range from $200 to $1,500 and can 
be no more than one-half of the total assistance given to each student. The 
cumulative amount a student can receive is limited to no more than $4,000 
over a four-year period (or $5,000 for a five-year baccalaureate program). 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

Athletic awards are made upon the recommendation of the Athletic Depart- 
ment to athletes who meet the established qualifications for such awards. 
A full athletic award provides tuition, fees, room, meals, books and supplies 
and $15 per month for laundry and dry cleaning. Awards are available in all 
sports. 

NATIONAL STUDENT DEFENSE DIRECT LOANS 

In this federal program students who have been accepted for enrollment or 
currently enrolled students taking at least half-time course loads and who 
can demonstrate financial need may borrow a maximum of $5,000 for under- 
graduate study, with a limit of $2,500 during the first two years. Graduate 
students may borrow up to $2,500 per year to a maximum of $10,000 (includ- 
ing undergraduate loans). The repayment and interest period begins nine 
months after a student ends his studies. The loans bear interest at the rate of 
three percent per year and the repayment may be extended over a 10-year 
period, provided the payments are no less than $15 per month. Preceding 
graduation or other discontinuation of studies, borrowers in this program are 
expected to have exit interviews with the loan officer in the Office of Business 
Affairs to establish a repayment schedule. 

Loans on essentially the same terms as the National Student Defense Direct 
Loan are made from the various University loan funds. 

GUARANTEED STUDENT LOANS 

Under the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, students are eligible to 
apply for loans up to $2,500 for a single year with an aggregate of $7,500 for 
undergraduate students and $10,000 for graduate and professional students 
(including undergraduate loans). These loans are made by private lenders in the 
state of the student's residence. Procedures are different in each state. In 
North Carolina most loans are made through College Foundation, Inc., an 
agency insured by the State Education Assistance Authority. College Founda- 
tion applications and information about loans available to students from other 
states may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office, 205 Peele Hall. 

COLLEGE WORK STUDY 

Students from relatively low-income families are eligible for employment by 
the University in on- and off-campus jobs under federally supported work- 
study programs. Students may work up to 15 hours weekly while attending 
classes full-time. 



22 



PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT 

The Financial Aid Office operates an employment service for all students 
desiring part-time work while attending school. Jobs are available on and off 
campus and are not necessarily based on financial need. Placement is 
usually arranged after the student has his class schedule. Interested students 
should refer to the list of current job openings available at the Student Em- 
ployment Office, 205 Peele Hall. 

EMERGENCY LOANS 

Small short-term loans are available to meet unexpected expenses. These 
loans must be repaid in 30 to 60 days and are not extended beyond the end of 
a term or graduation. 



Student Housing 



North Carolina State University strives to provide suitable accommodations 
for its students. The University operates 13 residence halls which house 
3,958 men, two residence halls which house 800 women, one residence hall 
which houses 360 men and 456 women, and 300 apartments for married 
students. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

The residence halls are operated to provide opportunities through group 
living experiences which will complement and expand the educational exper- 
iences of the residents. Each hall is staffed with selected students, both gradu- 
ate and undergraduate, who are responsible directly to professionally trained 
people in their area and to the Director of Residence Life. The staff members 
are available to help students initiate programs and activities and to advise 
and assist residents in any way possible. 

The staffs assist the elected officers in each hall to promote a sense of 
community which is created from the development of cooperation and mutual 
respect. Residents are encouraged to explore their environment, to take 
advantage of its many offerings and to initiate, plan, and pursue experimental 
courses in which they are interested. 

Living arrangements in buildings vary. Six high-rise buildings are ar- 
ranged in suites of four or five rooms snaring a bath; the other buildings 
have a center corridor with rooms opening on to it. The rooms are furnished 
but the residents have to provide bed linen, pillows and towels. 

STUDENT HOUSING POLICY 

Orientation to a university educational environment is an important 
adjustment for the new student. North Carolina State University recognizes 
the experience gained from residence hall group living as being of significant 
value in this personal development of the new student and has, therefore, 
adopted the following housing policy for both men and women. 

Any student who has carried less than 28 hours (passed or failed at North 
Carolina State University or any other college or university) must reside in 
University housing unless (1) married and living locally with spouse, (2) living 
with parent or married member of his or her immediate family, or (3) veteran 
(at least two years of active military service). Students who qualify under 
one of the above exemptions must obtain written permission from the Director 

23 



of Residence Facilities to live outside University housing. 

If a single undergraduate student who has carried 28 hours or more does 
not arrange for University housing, this will be the student's certification to 
the University that he or she has obtained parental permission to live outside 
University housing. 

To be eligible for University housing one must enroll as a regular full-time 
student (an undergraduate must roster a minimum of 12 credit hours per 
semester). 

ROOM RENTALS AND RESERVATIONS 

Rooms in the men's residence hall rent for $133 per semester and in the 
women's hall for $158 per semester. Reservation cards are mailed with the 
letter of acceptance for admission to the University. These reservation cards and 
the check for the rent must be returned to the Office of Business Affairs in 
accordance with the dates established by the Housing Rental Office before room 
assignments can be made. 

REFUND OF ROOM RENT 

If a room reservation is cancelled at the Housing Rental Office, Leazar Hall, 
in person or in writing on or before August 15th for fall semester and 
December 15th for spring semester (the date of cancellation is the date notifi- 
cation is received by that office), the rent paid will be refunded less a $25 
reservation fee, which is nonrefundable if a student is eligible to register. 
Between August 15th (for fall semester) and the last day to withdraw with 
tuition refund, and between December 15th (for spring semester) and the last 
day to withdraw with tuition refund, no refund will be made for any reason 
other than failure to register or official withdrawal from the University. 
During these times and for the above stated reasons, the rent paid will be 
refunded less the $25 reservation fee and a daily charge of $2 from the first 
day of classes until the room is vacated. Students who fail to notify the Housing 
Rental Office and who fail to check in and secure their keys on or before 5 p.m. 
the first day of classes will have their reservation cancelled without refund. 

HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The University operates 300 apartments (McKimmon Village) for married 
students. The rental is $50.50 for an efficiency; $61.00 for a one-bedroom; 
and $72.50 for a two-bedroom, including water only (gas is included in 
efficiency units). Priority in renting goes to graduate students. Information on 
availability and applications should be requested from the Housing Rental 
Office, North Carolina State University, Box 5505, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. 

Raleigh has numerous privately owned apartments and houses available for 
rent to university students. A partial listing is located in the Housing Rental 
Office. No listing is published because of the rapid turnover. 

The University does not operate a trailer parking area; however, privately 
owned parks are available within a reasonable distance of the campus. 

FRATERNITIES 

Seventeen of the 18 social fraternities chartered by the University maintain 
a chapter house. Twelve of the houses are located on Fraternity Row, a Uni- 
versity owned project; the remaining five are located throughout the immediate 
community. Presently plans are being made for construction of two sorority 



24 



houses on Fraternity Row. Fraternities are under the University's super- 
vision and are required to have a resident housemother or chapter resident 
adviser who serves in a wide variety of ways. 

Rental fees vary in fraternity houses depending upon the individual chapter, 
but are approximately the same as the residence hall rates. 



Forest Resources undergraduates receive instruction in this specialized labora- 
tory on the testing of tear strength of experimental papers. 






Geosciences offers training in physical and 
engineering sciences as well as geology 
training in areas pertinent to human affairs. 



Food Science students apply physical and 
biological sciences, engineering and eco- 
nomics to food development, processing, 
packaging, quality control, distribution and 
utilization. 



Front entrance to new University Student Center. 



-^- 



All freshmen engineering majors take this Analog Hybrid Terminal laboratory to 
become acquainted with computerized problem solving. 




Laboratory work gives practical 
experience to students studying in- 
dustrial arts education. 



View of the Coliseum and the University 
Student Center looking from the Students 
Supply Store. 





Pulp and water become paper in the laboratories of the School of Forest Resources. 





Textiles students are concerned with indus- 
trial processes that constitute the final steps 
in the preparation of textile materials for 
the consumer. 



University residence halls. 





Plasma physics students investigate 
behavior of charged particle beams. 



New PULSTAR reactor in Nuclear 
Engineering. 




The effects of space on living organisms is studied in this genetics lab. 







The University Plaza at night. 




Study areas in the air-conditioned 
D.H. Hill Library provide com- 
fortable surroundings for the 
student. 



"All-Campus Weekend," each 
spring, is a welcome break from 
studies enjoyed by students. 




Playing chess is just one of 
many extra curricular activi- 
ties enjoyed by NCSU stu- 
dents. 





Plasma physics students util- 
ize the 'linear pinch." 



Twelve national social fraternities maintain houses in a fraternity court near 
the campus. All houses are under University supervision and have a resident 
housemother or chapter resident adviser. 







Hi- 



W£m Kr - ' 


o 


mm 








«-r:*— ■ 




The School of Engineering prepares students 
for entry into the fields of design, develop- 
ment, production, sales, application, and 
planning or operation of industrial units, as 
well as for advanced study in a specialized 
engineering branch. 



Marine Science students work at 
laboratories on the North Caro- 
lina coast. 




One of the many large lecture rooms on 


the NCSU campus. 






iL___ _ 


— 


— 


1 V 






#* ^ *i/ - ^~~~~~l~7*m&* 












1 




T^^^ 


1 "*•" 




Outdoor eating facilities are available at several locations on campus. 



Electron microscopes are used in 
teaching and research in agri- 
cultural and life sciences. 





Research in a history course lead to the 
creation of this dress and pie based on 
patterns and recipes of the days of Henry 
VIII. 



jB|| 


j 


ijlL 


rl 




UN 










^^^^^^^^^jpB 



William Neal Reynolds Coliseum. 




The NCSU marching band performs at all 
home football games. 



The greenhouse range constitutes a valuable research and education complex. 




An English professor involved in a research project on ancient Greece displays 
replicas of vase paintings and weaponry. 





The campus craft shop provides instruc- 
tion and facilities for development of 
skills ranging from ceramics and weaving 
to photography and woodworking. 



Cox Hall, headquarters for the 
School of Physical and Mathemat- 
ical Sciences. 




Check-out desk at D.H. Hill Library. 




Typical campus scene in the 
residence hall area. 



The University Student Center has several different types of eating facilities. 

_________ 



fl 



Academic Regulations 

QUALITY POINTS AND GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

North Carolina State University uses a system of credit hours, letter grades 
and quality points. The semester credit hours represent the amount of work 
completed, the letter grades indicate the quality of the student's work, and the 
quality points provide a means of converting letter grades to numerical 
averages. Four quality points are earned by undergraduate students for each 
hour of A; three for B; two for C; one for D; and none for F. For example, 
a grade of B in a three credit hour course would earn nine quality points 
for that course. 

The grade-point average is obtained by dividing the total number of quality- 
points earned at NCSU (plus any earned at another campus of the 
statewide University of North Carolina system)* by the number of credit hours 
carried for quality points (passed plus failed). Credit hours transferred from 
other colleges and universities, obtained by proficiency examination, or earned 
in certain programs or credit-only courses do not enter into the computation 
of the grade-point average. 

* Subject to change by the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina system. 

DEFINITION OF LETTER GRADES AND QUALITY POINT VALUES 



Grade 




Quality Points 
Per Credit Hour 


A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 

D 


Satisfactory 
Poor 


2 
1 


F 

FA 
FD 
FI 

S 
U 
CR 

NC 


Unacceptable 

Unacceptable (Did not attend examination) 

Unacceptable (Dropped course) 

Unacceptable (Failed to remove incomplete) 

Satisfactory 

Unsatisfactory 

Passing grade for credit-only course 

No credit: Failing grade for credit-only course 













Neither quality points nor credit hours are given for the following grades: 
W — Withdrew with passing grade, IN — Incomplete (temporary), LA — Later 
(temporary), AB — Excused from final examination (temporary), AU — Audit, 
NG — Poor Attendance (AU grade not given). 

At the discretion of the professor, a student may be given an incomplete (IN) 
grade for work not completed because of a serious interruption in his work not 
caused by his own negligence. An incomplete must be made up by the end of the 
next regular semester (not including summer sessions) the student is in resi- 
dence unless the department involved is not able to allow the make-up. In the 
latter case, the department will notify the student and the Department of Regis- 
tration and Records when the IN must be made up. The student must not 
register again for the course while the IN stands. Any incomplete not 
removed during either the period specified by the department or the next 
regular semester in residence will automatically become a failure and will be 
recorded as FI except in the case of a graduating senior who does not need the 

37 



course to meet a graduation requirement; in this instance the Incomplete (IN) 
will be changed to a W by the school dean or director of instruction. 

A grade of FA is recorded for an unexcused absence from a final examination. 
If an absence from the examination is excused, a grade of AB is recorded, and 
the student must arrange to take the examination during the next regular 
semester (not including summer session) he is in residence, or the final 
grade becomes FA. The student must not register again for the course while the 
AB stands. 

The grade of FD is recorded if a student has unofficially dropped a course 
for which he had been scheduled or if he has officially dropped it with a failure. 
A failure may be made up only by repeating the subject. Such a repeat 
course must be regularly scheduled on the student's class schedule. 

In the case of a graduating student who has received an AB (absent from 
examination) or an IN (incomplete), the following procedures will apply: 

1. If the course is not needed to meet a graduation requirement (course, 
total credit hour, or 2.0) the AB or IN will be changed to a W by the 
school dean or director of instruction. 

2. If the course is needed for graduation, the student will not be allowed to 
graduate until the work has been made up. 

GRADE REPORTS 

At registration, students will be asked to complete an address card which 
will be used to mail grade reports and other routine correspondence. Many 
student grade reports go to the students' parents or guardians. However, many 
students, because of age or marital status, elect to have their grade reports 
sent directly to themselves. 

ACADEMIC RETENTION-SUSPENSION RULES 

An undergraduate student whose cumulative grade-point average is 26 or 
more quality points below the 2.0 level required for graduation in all under- 
graduate curricula is suspended and is ineligible to continue for the next 
regular semester unless he is eligible to continue under the Semester 2.0 
Continuation Rule. 

For a student who has been readmitted by the Admissions Committee or who 
was eligible to continue under the sliding scale requirement that was in effect 
prior to the constant quality point deficit system, the Semester 2.0 Continua- 
tion Rule permits a student whose deficit is greater than 25 quality points 
but who has made at least a 2.0 average for his most recent regular semester 
(regardless of the number of hours he has carried during that semester) to 
continue on Provisional Status. 

A student can lose his eligibility to continue under the Semester 2.0 Con- 
tinuation Rule if he attends summer school and earns less than a 2.0 in 
either summer session. Such an increase in his overall quality point deficit 
puts him into Suspended status. Thus, he will not be eligible to register for a 
regular semester (1) unless he is approved by the admissions committee or (2) 
until by correspondence course work and/or subsequent summer session 
work he reduces his quality -point-deficiency to 25 quality points or less. 

A suspended student may appeal to the Admissions Committee for special 
consideration of extenuating circumstances. A letter of petition should be writ- 
ten by the student to the Admissions Committee stating: 

1. the reason for one's academic difficulty 

2. the reason why one believes he or she can now be successful in meeting 
the University's academic standards. 

38 



REPEATING COURSES 

A student who repeats a course previously taken (passed or failed) will have 
both grades counted in his cumulative grade-point average. An undergraduate 
student may be allowed as many semester hours as are appropriate in one's 
curriculum for courses that : (1) are titled seminar, special problems, special 
topics, independent study or research; such courses are usually numbered 
490-499 or 590-599 and (2) cover topics different from those studied when the 
courses were taken previously. However, for any courses other than one that 
satisfies these conditions, if a student repeats and passes the course both 
times, the semester hours will be counted only once toward the number of hours 
required for graduation. 

The adviser's approval is required for a student to repeat any course pre- 
viously passed. Such approval should not be given when a student wishes 
to repeat a course which he or she has already passed with a grade of A or B. 
Nor should it be given when: (1) a student wishes to repeat a lower division 
course that he or she has passed with a grade of C or better after having suc- 
cessfully completed an advanced course covering the same material or (2) a 
student wishes to repeat a lower level course that one has passed with a C or 
better which is a prerequisite for an advanced course that one had already 
successfully completed. 

CREDIT-ONLY COURSES 

Each undergraduate student will have the option to count toward gradua- 
tion requirements a maximum of 12 semester hours in the category of "credit- 
only" courses (exclusive of courses which departments or instructors choose to 
grade on a Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory basis with the approval of the Provost's 
Office). The student may select as "credit-only" any course offered by the 
University except the several courses in Military Science and Aerospace Studies. 
The selected courses must be included under the free elective category of the 
specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. He will be placed in a 
regular section and will be responsible for attendance, assignments, and 
examinations. 

The student's performance in a "credit-only" course will be reported as CR 
(passing grade for credit-only course) or NC (no credit: failing grade for 
credit-only course) and will not affect his grade point average. A passing grade 
(CR) will allow the course credit to be counted toward the student's graduation 
requirements. D-level work (passing work) is considered an adequate basis for 
awarding credit (CR) if the instructor is otherwise satisfied with the student's 
class participation, attitude, and attendance. A student should be made 
aware that "credit-only" work may drop him below 12 hours of course work 
for which quality points are earned and thus make him ineligible for Semester 
Dean's List. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

If a regularly enrolled student wishes to withdraw from the University 
(dropping all courses) during a semester or summer session, he must go to the 
Counseling Center to initiate the official withdrawal process. 

Determination of grades and the entry on the permanent record for a student 
withdrawing during a semester depend upon his reasons for withdrawal, the 
time of withdrawal in the semester, and his standing in his courses at the 
time of withdrawal. A student who discontinues attendance in all classes with- 
out officially withdrawing will receive all "FD" grades. 

39 



A student who withdraws after the first two weeks of classes will not 
receive any refund of tuition and fees, except in unusual cases approved by the 
Refund Committee. 

Withdrawal constitutes a break in the student's residence, and, if the student 
plans to return, he must file a readmission form even though he may have pre- 
registered for the next academic period. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SUPERIOR STUDENTS 

Several schools encourage talented students by providing opportunities for 
selected upperclassmen to pursue independent study and original work. The 
Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering, Forest Resources and 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences have organized programs to include 
several possibilities as honors courses, undergraduate research and seminars. 
Potential participants are identified through advanced placement, academic 
performance, and faculty recommendation. There are also optional programs 
of advanced level work offered by the Departments of History, Mathematics, 
Modern Language and Physics. 

Information is available from faculty advisers, teaching departments and the 
office of the dean of each school. 

CHANGE OF NAME OR ADDRESS 

It is the student's responsibility to inform the Department of Registration 
and Records of any changes in name or address. Failure to do this may cause 
delay in the handling of the student's records. 

AUDITS 

A student wishing to audit a course must have the approval of his adviser 
and of the department offering the course. The participation of auditors in 
class discussion and in examinations is optional with the instructor. Auditors 
receive no credit; however, they are expected to attend classes regularly. 

A student who has taken a course for audit may, with his adviser's approval, 
enroll in the course for credit during the subsequent semester or summer ses- 
sion. 

REEXAMINATIONS 

Any student who fails a course within two semesters of graduation and 
who fails only one course during that semester may apply to the Depart- 
ment of Registration and Records for permission to remove that failure by 
taking a reexamination on the total subject matter of the course. For this 
regulation, summer school counts as a semester. If he fails that reexamina- 
tion, he is not eligible for another reexamination in that course. If he fails 
more than one course during the next to the last semester, he cannot take 
a reexamination that semester; but if he subsequently removes all but one of 
these deficiencies by repeating the course or courses, has had no other re- 
examination, and has completed all other degree requirements, he may 
apply at the end of his last semester in residence for permission to take a 
reexamination. 

Eligibility to take a reexamination will be determined by the Department 
of Registration and Records. When such a reexamination is taken to remove 
an F, only the reexamination grade will be counted. A senior who has passed 
a reexamination will have his grade for that course changed from F to D, 



40 



which will affect his cumulative grade-point average. A fee of $5 is charged 
for administering such a reexamination. If a student takes a reexamination, 
fails it, and subsequently audits the course, he cannot take another reexami- 
nation, but may apply for credit by examination, which carries no grade. 

SEMESTER COURSE LOAD AND SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

The University considers a minimum full-time semester load as 12 credit 
hours for undergraduates and nine credit hours for graduate students. The 
maximum load for a semester is 21 credit hours for undergraduates and 15 
credit hours for graduate students. To carry more than the maximum, a 
student must consult with his adviser and obtain the approval of his dean or 
director of instruction. Permission is granted only under extenuating cir- 
cumstances. 

For a regular summer session, a student must have the same approval if 
he carries more than seven credit hours. 

A student whose deficiency is one through 25 quality points will be placed 
on Provisional Status and will be responsible for seeing his adviser for ap- 
proval if he has scheduled more than 15 credit hours for a regular semester. 

To be eligible to live in a residence hall or a fraternity house, an under- 
graduate student must carry at least a 12-hour load during a regular semes- 
ter. 

Freshmen English — English 111 and 112 are required in all curricula and 
must be scheduled in successive semesters until they are completed satisfac- 
torily. Students must earn a grade of C or better in one of the two courses. 
Those students who qualify for advanced placement on the basis of pre- 
vious academic record and performance on the College Board Scholastic 
Aptitude Test will be given opportunity to enroll in English 112H. If such 
students earn a grade of C or better in the course, six hours of credit (three 
"by examination") will be allowed, covering both courses. The Writing Lab- 
oratory (ENG 200) may not be used to satisfy the freshman English require- 
ment. 

Physical Education Requirements — Physical education shall be required 
of undergraduate students. The duration of required participation shall vary 
from a minimum of one year (two semesters) to a maximum of two years 
(four semesters) depending upon the needs, interests and abilities of the 
individual students. The duration of the requirement shall be determined by 
the Department of Physical Education. Exceptions to the physical educa- 
tion requirement are granted on the basis of the university physician's recom- 
mendation. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

A currently registered undergraduate student (degree, unclassified or 
special) desiring to take an examination for course credit in lieu of enrolling 
or reenrolling for the course must initiate the request with his adviser (ex- 
cept when a teaching department initiates group testing of beginning stu- 
dents for placement purposes and grants credit). Should the adviser approve, 
the student must arrange for the examination with the department offering 
the course. The department may administer the examination in any manner 
pertinent to the materials of the course. The academic standards for credit 
by examination will be commensurate with the academic standards for the 
course. 

If the student exhibits satisfactory performance on the examination, the 



41 



instructor will notify the Department of Registration and Records on a late 
grade report form (pink) by stating, "Credit by Examination". The Depart- 
ment of Registration and Records will enter the appropriate number of credit 
hours on the student's permanent record and will issue a grade report as for 
courses taken in residence. Credits earned in this manner are considered in 
the same way as transfer credits and are not used in the computation of the 
student's grade-point average. If the student fails, no action beyond notify- 
ing the student is required. The Department of Registration and Records 
will post course credit to the permanent record only if the student is cur- 
rently registered. 

READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS 

A former student returning is one who (a) was not in attendance during 
the fall or spring semester prior to applying for readmission or (b) withdrew 
from the University during a fall or spring semester or during a summer 
session. All former students returning, both graduates and undergraduates, 
must apply for readmission. A student who receives a bachelor's degree must 
apply for admission to the Graduate School or for readmission as an under- 
graduate working toward a second bachelor's degree, unclassified, or profes- 
sional. Preregistration alone is not sufficient to enable the student to be re- 
admitted. 

Regulations: 

1. A student who was eligible to continue at NCSU at the time of his 
leaving is eligible to return even though his quality-point deficit ex- 
ceeds the maximum of 25 [except as indicated in (a) or (b) immediately 
below]. Students in this category need only complete a readmission 
form. 

a. A student who was eligible to continue at the time of his leaving 
but who has subsequently taken work at another institution and 
earned less than a C average on such work must complete a read- 
mission form and write a letter of petition to the Admissions Com- 
mittee. 

b. A student eligible to continue at the time of his leaving who has 
subsequently taken correspondence and/or extension work at NCSU 
or course work at another campus of the statewide University of 
North Carolina system* and earned grades which resulted in sus- 
pension must complete a readmission form and write a letter of 
petition to the Admissions Committee. 

* Subject to change by the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina 
System. 

2. Suspended Students. A suspended student is eligible to attend summer 
school at North Carolina State University and take approved corre- 
spondence courses to improve his academic standing and will be eligible 
for readmission when he reduces his quality point deficit to 25 or less. 
There is no limit on the number of summer school periods open to a 
student who is trying to earn readmission. A student who was sus- 
pended under former retention-suspension regulations but whose over- 
all deficiency is less than 25 quality points is eligible for readmission 
provided he has not subsequently taken work at another institution 
and earned less than a C average on such work. 

A student who was suspended under the now discontinued Semester 



42 



Rule, but who otherwise was eligible to continue at the time of his 
leaving, need only complete a readmission form. 

A student who was and continues to be suspended for academic 
deficiencies and who desires to return cannot be readmitted unless 
approved by the Admissions Committee. Each should write a letter of 
petition to the Admissions Committee stating: 

a. the reasons for academic difficulty; 

b. why he believes he can now be successful in meeting the University's 
academic standards and complete all degree requirements within a 
reasonable length of time; and 

c. the address to which he wishes the Committee's decision sent. 

DEAN'S LIST 

A full-time undergraduate student who earns a semester average of 3.0 
or better on 12 or more hours of course work for which quality points are 
earned is placed on the Semester Dean's List. This achievement is noted on 
the student's grade report and permanent academic record. Also, news stories 
on the Semester Dean's List are distributed to hometown newspapers. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified at the beginning of each regular semester and 
summer session. The required number of hours of each classification is as 
follows: 



Classification 

Freshman (FR) 

Sophomore (SO) 

Junior (JR) 

Senior (SR) 

Fifth Year (School of Design) (05) 



Semester Hours of Earned Credit 

Less than 28 

28 or more, but less than 60 

60 or more, but less than 92 

92 or more 

134 or more 



Agricultural Institute students are designated as first (01) and second (02) 
year students. Until an Agricultural Institute student has received a total of 
28 semester credits, he is classified as a first year student. 

Unclassified students are those who are working for college credit, but 
who are not enrolled in a degree-granting program. Admission as an un- 
classified student requires the recommendation of the dean of the school in 
which the student wishes to enroll. Unclassified students must meet the 
same entrance requirements as regular students and must meet the same 
entrance requirements to continue. 

Special undergraduate students in the various schools are non-degree 
candidates carrying seven hours (two courses) or less in a semester. Special 
undergraduates must meet the same academic requirements as regular stu- 
dents in order to continue during a regular semester. Special students on 
the graduate level are non-degree candidates who may not earn more than 
six hours in this classification. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC RECORD 

A transcript is an exact copy of a student's permanent academic record 
at the time it is issued. Each student is entitled to one free official transcript 
of his record. After the free copy, a fee of one dollar will be charged for each 
transcript. If a transcript is requested during a semester and a supplemental 
copy is needed after semester grades are posted, both original and supple- 



43 



mental copies are subject to the fee of one dollar each. 

No official transcript may be issued to or for a student who is indebted to 
the University until such indebtedness has been paid or satisfactorily ad- 
justed. 

CURRICULUM CHANGE 

In initiating a curriculum change, a student must secure a Curriculum 
Change Form from the office of his dean or director of instruction, obtain 
the required signatures, and file the completed form with the Department of 
Registration and Records, desirably by the end of the preregistration period. 

Although the Department of Registration and Records will not change the 
records until the student registers for a new semester or summer session, 
from the standpoint of advising, preregistration, and dropping courses, the 
student is considered to be in the new curriculum as soon as the Curriculum 
Change Form is completed and filed with the Department of Registration and 
Records, and his records are transferred to his new department. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

A student is scholastically eligible for graduation when he has satis- 
fied all the specific requirements of his department, his school and the Uni- 
versity and has earned at least a 2.0 cumulative average. 

Individual departments and/or schools may determine their own limits, if 
any, of credit hours for off-campus classes and/or correspondence courses. 

A transfer student, to be eligible for a bachelor's degree, normally must 
earn at least 24 of his last 30 hours of credit in residence on this campus; 
however, individual departments and/or schools may waive this guideline 
and determine their own residency requirements for a bachelor's degree. 
Each department and/or school shall establish its own regulation. 

To be graduated with honors or high honors, a student must have attained 
a 3.0 or a 3.5 grade point average respectively on all semester hours of work 
considered in computing his average. 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for more 
than one bachelor's degree may, upon the recommendation of their deans, be 
awarded two bachelor's degrees at the same or at different commencement 
exercises. To earn two degrees the student registers in one school or depart- 
ment and, with the cooperation of the second school or department, works 
out his program to cover the requirements for both. The student must file 
an approved Curriculum Change form labeled "Second Degree" with the De- 
partment of Registration and Records. 

Presence at graduation exercises is required except when permission for 
graduation in absentia is granted. Forms for requesting such permission are 
available from the Department of Registration and Records. 

Students anticipating graduating must file a "Diploma Blank" with the 
Department of Registration and Records the semester prior to such antici- 
pated graduation. Diploma blanks are available in any academic depart- 
mental office or in the Department of Registration and Records. 



The D. H. Hill Library 

Library facilities at North Carolina State University include the main 
D. H. Hill Library and special libraries for the Schools of Design and Tex- 

44 



tiles. The collections, totaling more than 600,000 volumes, have been care- 
fully assembled to serve the educational and research programs of the Uni- 
versity. 

The D. H. Hill Library contains particularly strong research holdings in the 
biological and physical sciences, in all fields of engineering, agriculture and 
forestry. The 6,000 volume Friedrich F. Tippmann collection in the field of 
entomology and related biological sciences is one of the outstanding collec- 
tions in the country. The collection of books and journals in the humanities 
and social sciences is especially helpful to undergraduate students. 

The library's comprehensive collection of scientific journals emphasizes 
the major teaching and research interests at NCSU; approximately 6,700 
journals are received regularly. A large collection of state and federal govern- 
ment publications further strengthens the library's research material. The 
D. H. Hill Library is a depository for publications of the Atomic Energy 
Commission and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United 
Nations, and has been a depository for U. S. federal documents since 1923. 

The Textiles Library, located in Nelson Textile Building, contains out- 
standing holdings in the field of textiles and textile chemistry. It is regarded 
as one of the best textile libraries in the country. The School of Design 
Library, in Brooks Hall, has a very fine collection of books, journals and 
slides in the areas of architecture, landscape architecture and product de- 
sign. 

As a further aid to graduate and faculty research, the library participates 
in an interlibrary loan program with the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, Duke University, Research Triangle Institute, IBM, Chem- 
strand, the Division of Environmental Health Services and the N. C. State 
Library in downtown Raleigh. A bus, arriving at North Carolina State Uni- 
versity daily Monday through Friday, makes resources from these seven 
libraries available to NCSU students and faculty. Among the materials avail- 
able are approximately 14,000 scientific periodicals. 

The D. H. Hill Library building has been expanded recently for additional 
library seating and open shelf collections. The building includes an 11-story 
addition and the addition of the Erdahl-Cloyd Wing for undergraduate ser- 
vices. The East Wing is the Reference-Research component of the Library 
and houses the card catalogs, the general reference department, the exten- 
sive U. S. documents collection and the library's extensive collection of cur- 
rent periodicals. The enlarged library complex provides bookstacks for over 
1,000,000 volumes and greatly expanded research facilities, including carrels 
and study areas. 

Among the many services offered by the library are orientation tours for 
faculty and graduate students, and also lectures on library use to all new 
students. Comprehensive reference service is available almost all the hours 
the library is open. The microform reading room houses a variety of micro- 
text readers and printers in the library and an extensive microfilm collection 
provides access to much important research material. Facilities for listening 
to taped recordings are available. One of the most widely used services in the 
library is the photocopy service. Coin-operated machines plus two machines 
operated by staff, provide a wide variety of photocopy service, including 
copy from microfilm. Machines may be used all hours the library is open. 



45 



General Information 

LAUNDRY 

The University operates a modern laundry and dry cleaning facility on 
campus at reasonable prices. Branch offices are located in the residence halls 
for the convenience of the students. 



LINEN AND BLANKET RENTAL 

The linen service provides for the initial issues of two sheets, one pillow 
case and three towels. The student may exchange his linen weekly at a cost 
of $28 per year. Pillows may be rented for $1.50 per year. A regular blanket 
rents for $3 per year, and the N. C. State monogrammed blanket rents for 
$6.50. These services are available to both on- and off-campus students. Ap- 
plication forms for these services will be mailed to each student. 

Refunds under the linen rental plan are computed on a semester basis. 
During a semester, refunds will be computed at a charge rate of 70 cents for 
each week the plan has been in use, plus a $3 service charge until $14 is 
exhausted. Refunds are not available for the weeks a student fails to ex- 
change linen. 

FOODSERVICE 

Food service is provided in Harris Cafeteria, the University Student Center, 
the University Student Center Annex and six snack bars on campus. 

Cost depends on the individual's requirements and the selection of food 
and could vary from $600 to $700 for the academic year. A Dining Club 
Plan is available in Harris Cafeteria at a reduction of approximately 10 per- 
cent from cash prices. Information concerning the Club Plan is furnished 
all regularly enrolled students prior to each fall semester. 

AUTOMOBILES 

Only those freshmen who are married and residing locally with spouses, 
those living in homes of parents or those physically handicapped will be 
permitted to register or park a four-wheeled motor vehicle on the University 
campus at any time. Each freshman is reminded that giving any false in- 
formation regarding registration of motor vehicles or allowing another stu- 
dent to register a vehicle for him will be a direct violation of the Honor Code. 

For the purpose of traffic rules and regulations, the campus is defined to 
include all University property adjoining or contiguous to the main campus 
(McKimmon Village and Fraternity Court included). 

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT CENTER 

The Career Planning and Placement Center offers assistance to all stu- 
dents at North Carolina State University at all degree levels, and this ser- 
vice is available on a year round basis. Advice on the relationship of personal 
career goals to various programs of study and assistance in the identifica- 
tion of individual aptitudes and abilities affecting career potential are avail- 
able to students. Aptitude and interest testing is a service provided by the 
Counseling Center to which students are often referred in the initial stages 
of their career planning. Students are urged to take advantage of the career 
planning service in the early years on campus in order to identify their 

46 



career potential and to make optimum educational decisions. 

In addition, this office arranges and coordinates job interviews between 
students and employer representatives. In their senior year students are 
urged to use this placement service for interviewing with potential employers. 
The staff will also recommend contacts with employers not scheduled to 
visit the campus, and will advise students of job opportunities given to the 
center by mail or telephone. 

Representatives of business, industry, government and education come 
from throughout the country to interview North Carolina State University 
students. Typically about 800 employers will conduct approximately 10,000 
interviews a year on campus, with additional numbers of employers advis- 
ing of career potential by mail or phone. 

Career Planning and Placement Center personnel provide individual and 
group career advisory programs on job and graduate school opportunities 
and placement in general. Other functions of the center include helping 
students find summer work and temporary or part-time jobs related to their 
field of study, and assisting alumni with career adjustments. 

In addition to its responsibilities to students, the center serves as a con- 
necting link between the University and the business and industrial com- 
munity with the further responsibility of keeping the faculty and administra- 
tion informed of employment trends. 

HEALTH 

North Carolina State University seeks to safeguard the health of the stu- 
dent in every way possible. The University maintains a 64-bed infirmary 
which is open 24 hours a day. The infirmary is fully staffed by physicians, 
nurses and auxiliary personnel. Among the valuable features of the infirmary 
are an up-to-date first-aid department and an X-ray department. 

The University physicians observe daily office hours at the infirmary in the 
mornings and afternoons. In addition, they visit the infirmary more often when 
necessary. A graduate nurse is on duty day and night. Students have free 
access to the infirmary at all times except when closed during holiday periods. 

In case of accident or the serious illness of a student, parents or guardians 
will be notified immediately. No surgical operation will be performed with- 
out full consent of parents or guardians, except in cases of extreme emer- 
gency. 

The medical fee paid by each student provides for infirmary service, gen- 
eral medical treatment and the services of nurses. It does not provide for 
surgical operations, outside hospital care, or the services of dentists or other 
specialists. Special students and others who have not paid the health fee are 
not entitled to the services of the Student Health Service. 

Before the student enters North Carolina State University, he should have 
a complete, thorough examination by his family physician. Any abnormality 
should be noted and all defects corrected in order to prevent unnecessary loss 
of time while the student is in college. If the examination is not made be- 
fore he enters, the student will be given a physical examination at the Uni- 
versity, for which a fee is charged. Blanks for the physical examination may 
be secured from the Office of Admissions. Physical examinations for en- 
trance into the University, for job application, marriage, food handlers, mili- 
tary, passport, etc., will be given at the convenience of the Director of the 
Health Service and at an extra fee. 

The infirmary does not offer its services to dependents of students. Mar- 



47 



ried students are encouraged to enroll in the Student Government Health 
and Accident Insurance Group Policy which covers dependents. 

ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE 

The University offers annually a plan of student accident and health in- 
surance. The insurance is planned to cover the surgical, accident, and hospi- 
tal needs of the student, as a supplement to the services offered through the 
infirmary. Each year complete information will be made available to stu- 
dents before the opening of school. 

Foreign students are required to enroll in the sickness and accident in- 
surance plan provided through the University or to have similar coverage 
under other insurance plans or arrangements with their sponsors. 

ORIENTATION 

The University sponsors a Summer Orientation Program for all new stu- 
dents. Anyone who, because of extreme hardship, finds that he or she is un- 
able to attend the summer program may request permission to attend late 
orientation during the week preceeding the opening of school. 

The orientation program is designed to acquaint new students with the 
academic, extracurricular and social life at North Carolina State University. 
A planned series of meetings and conferences with faculty and student 
leaders gives newcomers to the campus the information needed to get their 
college careers underway. 

COUNSELING 

The Counseling Center in Peele Hall has a staff of counselors to help 
students with the problems of adjustment to college life, problems of voca- 
tional and curricular choice and any other problems a student might wish to 
discuss. The center administers aptitude and interest tests and maintains a 
file of occupational information to help guide students in career selection. 

The center also offers psychiatric evaluation service and marriage coun- 
seling, provided by part-time specialists who augment the center staff. Cen- 
ter staff members offer personal adjustment counseling, group counseling 
and self-development workshops. 

Students may come to the center on their own accord, or they may be re- 
ferred by teachers, advisers or other members of the University staff. There 
is no charge for conferences, but a small materials fee is charged when tests 
are administered. 

FOREIGN STUDENT ADVISER 

A foreign student adviser, as a part of the Counseling Center in 213 Peele 
Hall, offers counseling and guidance services to all foreign students. Foreign 
students and faculty may obtain help with visas, passports, currency per- 
mits, tax information, and medical, personal and social problems. 

International Student Orientation (ISO 100), a one-hour course given in 
the fall semester, is required of all foreign students to acquaint them with 
university procedures, government regulations, and practical problems of 
life in Raleigh. Subjects covered include university services, immigration 
regulations, health and automobile insurance, drivers license requirements, 
employment, taxes and consumer problems. 

Study Opportunities Abroad and Foreign Travel information is available 



48 



to all students from their foreign student adviser. A file on world-wide study 
opportunities is maintained in that office. Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright Schol- 
arships and foreign travel information is also available. International Stu- 
dent Identity Cards may be purchased by qualifying full-time students. 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

When a student enrolls at North Carolina State University, he or she is 
assigned a faculty adviser who is usually a member of the department in 
which the student will be taking major work. The adviser: (a) provides in- 
formation, advice, and recommendations in academic and related areas, 
(b) directs the student to sources which explain in detail academic regula- 
tions, course prerequisites and graduation requirements, (c) helps the new 
student to understand the degree to which one should assume responsibility 
for one's own program planning, (d) provides vocational guidance and occu- 
pational information in one's area of specialty, and (e) refers the student to 
the appropriate individual, office or agency when further assistance is in- 
dicated. 

Deans, directors of instruction and department heads are also available 
to students wanting information about different curricula and help in form- 
ing educational plans. Instructors are usually the best source of help to stu- 
dents having difficulty with particular subjects. Members of the faculty 
keep office hours and expect students to consult them individually whenever 
special assistant is needed. 

COOPERATING RALEIGH COLLEGES 

The Cooperating Raleigh Colleges is a voluntary organization comprised 
of North Carolina State University, Meredith College, Peace College, St. 
Augustine's College, St. Mary's Junior College and Shaw University. The 
organization's purpose is to develop and conduct cooperative educational 
activities. The organization provides the opportunity for any student to enroll 
at another institution for a course or courses not offered on his home campus. 
Other activities include a cooperative library arrangement, joint student activ- 
ities and faculty cooperation and interchange. 

Student Activities 

North Carolina State University makes every effort to provide the stu- 
dent with surroundings which are pleasant and conducive to intellectual 
growth. Respecting the student as an individual, the University assures him 
or her the maximum of personal liberty within the limits necessary for or- 
derly progression of class work. In return, the student is expected to pay 
serious attention to his or her purpose in attending this University and to 
observe rules of conduct consistent with maturity. Through the various ser- 
vices and activities identified with everyday life on campus* as well as 
through the several extracurricular organizations and functions, the stu- 
dent at North Carolina State has an excellent opportunity for acquiring 
experience in group leadership and community living which may serve one 
well in one's professional career. 

As the student progresses in development, he or she will find many op- 
portunities to increase growth in citizenship by participating in the activities 
of both one's academic class and of the student body in general. Following 
is a survey of the various activities at North Carolina State University. 

49 



STUDENT BODY GOVERNMENT AND STUDENT JUCIDIAL SYSTEM 

When a student enters North Carolina State University, they become a 
member of a self-governing community. Legislative, executive and judicial 
authority, insofar as student affairs are concerned, rest with the Student 
Body Government which operates within the framework of over-all Univer- 
sity administration. The Student Body Government members and judicial 
department members are elected in campus-wide elections. The student has 
a voice in campus government by participating in these elections. Often in 
general elections one is asked to vote on proposed changes in policies which 
affect the student body. 

During each registration period, students are asked to sign either an honor 
code pledge or a recognition of academic integrity statement. These state- 
ments reflect the emphasis that North Carolina State University Student 
Government places upon academic integrity. 

CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 

Through the various honorary, professional, technical and social organiza- 
tions at North Carolina State University, the interested student finds oppor- 
tunities to participate in activities that appeal to him, and to meet others 
who have similar interests. 

HONORARY 

Honorary societies at North Carolina State University are Golden Chain, 
senior leadership; Blue Key, junior leadership; Thirty and Three, sophomore 
leadership; Phi Eta Sigma, men's freshman scholarship; Alpha Lambda 
Delta, women's freshman scholarship; and Phi Kappa Phi, junior, and senior 
and graduate students scholarship. 

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL 

Each school at North Carolina State University sponsors or supervises 
a large number of professional and technical societies and clubs. Students in 
every area of instruction are encouraged to join with their fellow students 
in pursuing their common interests. Many of these organizations contribute 
greatly to the students's professional and social growth. 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

Eighteen national social fraternities have chapters at State. The Univer- 
sity recognizes that the Interfraternity Council is the student organization 
responsible for fraternity matters and programs. The objectives of the Inter- 
fraternity Council are to promote the general interest and welfare of the 
associated fraternities and to insure cooperation among the fraternities, the 
faculty, the student body and the general public. A significant number of 
student leaders are members of the fraternity system. Fraternities have 
undergone great change during recent years. Present emphasis is directed 
toward developmental programming and meaningful small group relation- 
ships. 

The social fraternities at North Carolina State are Alpha Gamma Rho, 
Alpha Phi Alpha, Delta Sigma Phi, FarmHouse, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
Sigma Pi, Tau Kappa Epsilon and Theta Chi. 



50 



State also has two national social sororities, Sigma Kappa and Alpha 
Delta Pi. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

A variety of publications, both general and school-sponsored, are edited 
and managed by student officers, with faculty members serving as advisers. 
A student may gain journalistic experience and training in writing, editing 
or management by working on these publications. 

The three general publications, The Agromeck, the student broadcasting 
system, WPAK/WKNC-FM, and the Technician, are supported in large part 
by a publication fee included in each student's fees. 

The Agromeck is the University yearbook, providing a record of the senior 
class and of the principal events of the school year. The yearbook recalls in 
pictures the varied activities of the student body throughout the year, and is 
published for the entire student body. 

The Technician is the student newspaper issued three mornings a week 
and delivered to central locations on the campus, such as the coliseum, cafe- 
terias, classroom buildings and the Student Supply Store. The Technician 
serves as a forum for student expression as well as a medium for campus 
news of particular interest to State students. 

Although it is not a publication in the strictest sense of the word, WPAK/ 
WKNC-FM (at 600 KC), serves the same function through a different 
medium. It offers many opportunities for extracurricula training in actual 
broadcasting techniques as well as training in administration and program 
planning. The station transmits on carrier current and educational FM. 

Each student receives a copy of the current student handbook issue of the 
North Carolina State Bulletin, which contains detailed information about 
student organizations, activities and policies. 

Several of the schools have their own publications issued under the general 
supervision of the particular school and dealing with material of special 
interest to students in that school. These publications include Agri-Life pub- 
lished by the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences; the Pi-Ne-Tum, pub- 
lished by the School of Forest Resources; The Southern Engineer, published 
by the School of Engineering; The Textile Forum, published by the School 
of Textiles; The Publications of the School of Design; and The Scientist, 
published by the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

ATHLETICS 

North Carolina State University offers a variety of athletic activities. In 
addition to voluntary programs of intramural and intercollegiate sports, 
freshmen and sophomores are required to take two to four semesters of 
physical education. Juniors and seniors take physical education as an elective. 

Intramurals — The University maintains an extensive program of intra- 
mural sports which is administered by the Department of Physical Educa- 
tion. Intramural activities are divided into three basic programs: the tradi- 
tional sports program, the sports clubs program and the annual events pro- 
gram. 

In the traditional sports program individual and team sports are offered 
to both men and women with participation being voluntary. Competition is 
divided into four divisions: (1) residence halls (2) fraternity (3) open and 
(4) women. Thirteen sports are offered in the residence hall and fraternity 



51 



divisions, while 11 sports are offered in the open division. In the women's 
division competition is offered in 13 different activities. 

The sports clubs program is offered to individuals interested in opportuni- 
ties to participate in certain activities usually at a higher skill level than 
the traditional sports program affords. At the present time, the active clubs 
on campus are: (1) weight training (2) badminton (3) women's basketball 
(4) women's tennis and (5) outing. Bowling, gymnastics and volleyball are 
expected to organize. 

The North Carolina State University student also has the opportunity to 
participate in the annual events program. The men enjoy the competition of 
Big "4" Day with students from University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, 
Wake Forest University and Duke University. During Co-Rec Day mixed 
teams, men and women, from North Carolina State compete against mixed 
teams from University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, University of North 
Carolina - Charlotte and University of North Carolina - Greensboro. 

Sports offered in the intramural program are correlated with those taught 
in the required physical education classes. Instruction in these sports is pro- 
vided in the physical education classes and opportunity for increased com- 
petition is provided in the intramural program. An Intramural Advisory 
Board, composed of elected student representatives, recommends the policies 
to be administered by the intramural director. 

Intercollegiate — The Department of Athletics conducts the University's 
intercollegiate athletics program involving 14 varsity sports. The Wolfpack 
schedules games and matches in football, soccer, and cross-country in the 
fall season; basketball, wrestling, swimming, fencing, rifle, and indoor 
track during the winter months; and baseball, track, tennis, golf, and la- 
crosse in the spring. The University is a member of the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and sched- 
ules conference and national rivals in the above sports. Wolfpack teams and 
individuals have an outstanding record for conference and regional athletic 
honors earned in past competition. 

The athletics program is administered by the Athletics Director with the 
Athletics Council, made of five faculty, five alumni and five students, func- 
tioning to exercise institutional responsibility and control of the intercol- 
legiate athletics program. The program is self-sufficient and is operated 
through gate receipts and student fees. Athletics grants-in-aid are provided 
by friends and alumni through the North Carolina State Student Aid Asso- 
ciation (Wolfpack Club). 

The University has excellent facilities, with double-decked Carter Stadium, 
featuring 41,000 sideline seats, Reynolds Coliseum holding 12,000 for basket- 
ball, and Doak Field having 3,800 seats for baseball. A nine-lane tartan 
track and a 2,200 seat swimming stadium, with a twenty-five yard by twenty- 
five meter pool, are other fine facilities available. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Since the early days of North Carolina State, musical organizations have 
played an important part in the life of the campus. These groups present 
concerts, furnish music for official university functions and perform at 
athletic events. The combined membership of these organizations constitutes 
the largest voluntary student organization on campus. Students may join 
the bands, choral organizations, orchestras, and pipes and drum by report- 
ing for an audition at the time and location indicated in the orientation 



52 



schedule. Rehearsals are carefully arranged to avoid conflicts with study 
time or other classes. 

The new music facilities are excellent. Being sound-proof, the building 
contains three large rehearsal halls, 14 individual practice rooms, plus ample 
storage and library space. This building is completely air conditioned and 
humidity controlled. The latest architectural and engineering techniques 
were employed to insure the best acoustical treatment possible. 

Bands — The Symphonic Band, the Fanfare Band, the Brasschoir Band 
and the Marching Band make up the four divisions of the North Carolina 
State Bands. Each band serves a specific purpose in the musical life of the 
campus. Assignments to the various bands are made according to the in- 
terests and abilities of the individual students. The Symphonic, Fanfare and 
Brasschoir Bands are concert organizations, with the Symphonic Band hav- 
ing the most rigid requirements. The Marching Band, one of the best in the 
Atlantic Coast Conference, operates primarily during football season and is 
widely known for its spectacular half-time performances. The Clarinet Choir 
is an organization of Eb, Bb, Alto, Bass and Contrabass Clarinets. It is open 
to all regularly enrolled students. 

Choral Groups — The two divisions of the North Carolina State Choral pro- 
gram are the Varsity Men's Glee Club and the University Choir. Placement 
in these organizations is made according to abilities and interests of the 
individual. The Varsity Men's Glee Club is by history and tradition the prime 
performing group on campus and maintains a high level of entrance require- 
ments. 

The University Choir also requires a high level of musical interests and 
abilities. The choir is so constituted that on occasion the male section per- 
forms as the Collegiate Men's Glee Club and the female section is utilized as 
the Women's Chorus. The Varsity and the Choir present several concerts each 
year, both on and off the campus. Radio and television appearances, re- 
cordings, tours and the providing of small ensembles for special occasions 
are additional activities. For those interested in additional study of singing 
techniques, a Voice Guild is offered. 

Orchestras — Through a wide range of orchestral music, read and per- 
formed, suitable aesthetic needs of those actively involved in the orchestral 
offerings are met. Placement in the North Carolina State University Sym- 
phony Orchestra is according to the interest and ability of each individual. 
A position in the North Carolina State University Chamber Orchestra is de- 
pendent upon placement in the Symphony Orchestra. Both orchestras present 
several concerts each year on and off campus. An opportunity to coordinate 
musical efforts with professional musicians, recognized locally and nationally, 
is an integral part of these concerts. Provisions are made for those with an 
interest in string quartet and other small ensemble experience. 

NCS Pipes and Drums — The newest musical organization on the North 
Carolina State campus is a highland bagpipe group. One purpose of this 
organization is to provide an opportunity for interested students to learn an 
instrument known to many of North Carolina's early settlers. Another pur- 
pose is for this group to represent the university through a unique and dis- 
tinctive medium. Pipes and drums are provided. The organization performs 
at many university and community functions. No piping experience is neces- 
sary. Membership is open to all regularly enrolled students. 

The Guitar Guild — This is an informal association of amateur guitarists 
formed to enliven interest in the guitar. Comprised of both students and 
faculty, the Guild sponsors group and private lessons, concerts, workshops, 



53 



and publishes guitar music. Weekly meetings afford members the chance 
to exchange ideas, improve technique, gain exposure to different styles of 
playing, and explore guitar literature. 

Musician-in-Residence — North Carolina State University established this 
special chair in the Department of Music to help facilitate the cultural devel- 
opment of the entire University. Internationally known performers are ap- 
pointed to the Musician-in-Residence position on a rotating basis. The per- 
son holding this appointment performs a wide range of functions including 
concerts and programs, both formal and informal, presented throughout the 
year for the benefit and enjoyment of all students, as well as providing his 
talents and imparting his knowledge to various schools and departments as 
requested. There is no charge to university organizations for this service. In- 
formation concerning this unique program may be had by contacting the 
Director of Music. 

UNIVERSITY STUDENT CENTER 

The new University Student Center houses the major student organiza- 
tions: Student Government, the Technician, WKNC-FM/WPAK, the Agro- 
meek, the Inter-Residence Council, the Inter-Fraternity Council and the 
University Student Center Activity Board. It provides reading lounges, gal- 
leries, a newsstand and TV lounge, meeting rooms, a cafeteria on the top 
floor, a delicatessen and snack bar on the first floor, a coke lounge, ball- 
room, games room and 816-seat theater. In the Thompson Building the Cen- 
ter also operates one of the best equipped experimental theaters and craft 
shops in the Southeast. The University Student Center Annex in the Erdahl- 
Cloyd Wing of the D. H. Hill Library houses a snack bar, barbershop, bil- 
liards room and newsstand. 

The University Student Center sponsors a wide variety of programs in- 
cluding amateur and professional theatrical productions, pop and classical 
concerts, lectures, films, art shows, dances, international fairs, volunteer 
services and instruction in a wide variety of crafts. 

The Coordinator of Religious Affairs is also housed in the University 
Student Center. He sponsors, in cooperation with the YMCA and various 
chaplains assigned to the University, a wide range of activities from chapel 
services and seminars to multi-media productions. 



54 



University Calendar 



SPRING SEMESTER 1973* 



January 8 


Monday 


Opening day (counseling, ad- 
vising, new student orientation, 
etc.) 


January 8 


Monday 


All students complete registra- 
tion 


January 9 


Tuesday 


Change day (late registration, 
drop/add) 


January 10 


Wednesday 


First day of class 


January 17 


Wednesday 


Lasy day to add a course 


January 24 


Wednesday 


Last day to withdraw (or drop a 
course) with refund ; last day to 
drop a course without a grade 


March 2 


Friday 


Mid-term reports due; spring 
vacation begins at 10 p.m. 


March 12 


Monday 


Classes resume at 8 a.m. 


April 23 


Monday 


Holiday 


April 27 


Friday 


Last day of classes 


April 28-29 


Saturday-Sunday 


Reading days 


April 30-May 9 


Monday-Saturday 






Monday-Wednesday 


Final examinations 


May 12 


Saturday 


Commencement 


SUMMER SESSIONS 1973* 




First Session 






May 28-29 


Monday -Tuesday 


Opening days (counseling, ad- 
vising, etc.) 


May 30 


Wednesday 


Registration day (orientation, 
new students) 


May 31 


Thursday 


First day of classes 


June 5 


Tuesday 


Last day to register; last day to 
withdraw (or drop a course) 
with refund; last day to drop a 
course without a grade 


July 4 


Wednesday 


Holiday 


July 5 


Thursday 


Last day of classes 


July 6 


Friday 


Final examinations 


Second Session 






July 10-11 


Tuesday- Wednesday 


Opening days (counseling, ad- 
vising, etc.) 


July 12 


Thursday 


Registration day (orientation, 
new students) 


July 13 


Friday 


First day of classes 



*The calendar is tentative, subject to approval or change by the Board of Trustees. 



55 



July 18 



August 16 
August 17 

FALL SEMESTER 

August 20-24 

August 27 
August 27 

August 28 

August 29 
September 3 
September 5 
September 12 



October 19 
November 21 

November 26 
December 7 
December 8-9 
December 10-19 



Wednesday 



Thursday 
Friday 

1973* 

Monday-Friday 

Monday 
Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 
Monday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 



Friday 
Wednesday 

Monday 

Friday 

Saturday-Sunday 

Monday-Saturday 

Monday-Wednesday 



SPRING SEMESTER 1974* 



January 7 

January 7 

January 8 

January 9 
January 16 
January 23 

March 1 



Monday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 

Friday 



March 11 


Monday 


April 15 


Monday 


April 26 


Friday 



Last day to register; last day to 
withdraw (or drop a course) 
with refund; last day to drop a 
course without a grade 
Last day of classes 
Final examinations 



Opening days (counseling, ad- 
vising, late orientation, etc.) 
General faculty meeting 
All students complete registra- 
tion 

Change day (late registration, 
drop/add) 

First day of classes 
Holiday 

Last day to add a course 
Last day to withdraw (or drop 
a course) with refund; last day 
to drop a course without a grade 
Mid-Term reports due 
Thanksgiving vacation begins 
at 1 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day of classes 
Reading Days 

Final examinations 



Opening day (counseling, ad- 
vising, new student orientation, 
etc.) 

All students complete registra- 
tion 

Change day (late registration, 
drop/add) 

First day of classes 
Last day to add a course 
Last day to withdraw (or drop 
a course) with refund; last day 
to drop a course without a grade 
Mid-term reports due; spring 
vacation begins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Holiday 
Last day of classes 



•The calendar is tentative, subject to approval or change by the Board of Trustees. 



56 



April 27-28 


Saturday-Sunday 


Reading days 


April 29-May 8 


Monday-Saturday 






Monday- Wednesday 


Final examinations 


May 11 


Saturday 


Commencement 


SUMMER SESSIONS 1974* 




First Session 






May 27 


Monday 


Opening days (counseling, ad- 
vising, etc.) 


May 28 


Tuesday 


Registration day (orientation, 
new students) 


May 29 


Wednesday 


First day of classes 


June 3 


Monday 


Last day to register; last day 
to withdraw (or drop a course) 
with refund; last day to drop a 
course without a grade 


July 2 


Tuesday 


Last day of classes 


July 3 


Wednesday 


Final examinations 


Second Session 






July 9-10 


Tuesday-Wednesday 


Opening days (Counseling, ad- 
vising, etc.) 


July 11 


Thursday 


Registration day (orientation, 
new students) 


July 12 


Friday 


First day of classes 


July 17 


Wednesday 


Last day to register; last day to 
withdraw (or drop a course) with 
refund ; last day to drop a course 
without a grade 


August 15 


Thursday 


Last day of classes 


August 16 


Friday 


Final examinations 


FALL SEMESTER 1974* 




August 19-23 


Monday-Friday 


Opening days (counseling, ad- 
vising, late orientation, etc.) 


August 26 


Monday 


General faculty meeting 


August 26 


Monday 


All students complete registra- 
tion 


August 27 


Tuesday 


Change day (late registration, 
drop/add) 


August 28 


Wednesday 


First day of classes 


September 2 


Monday 


Holiday 


September 4 


Wednesday 


Last day to add a course 


September 11 


Wednesday 


Last day to withdraw (or drop 



a course) with refund ; last day to 
drop a course without a grade 



*The calendar is tentative, subject to approval or change by the Board of Trustees. 



57 



October 18 Friday 

November 27 Wednesday 

December 2 Monday 

December 6 Friday 

December 7-8 Saturday-Sunday 

December 9-18 Monday-Saturday 

Monday-Wednesday Final examinations 



Mid-term reports due 

Thanksgiving vacation beings at 

1 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8 a.m. 

Last day of classes 

Reading days 



*The calendar is tentative, subject to approval or change by the Board of Trustees. 



58 





Students in all programs find books and supplies 
in the Student Supply Store which operates a 
check cashing convenience, as does the campus 
student bank. 



Musical groups make up the largest voluntary 
organization on campus. 











i 1 ' ' ' 




, i 1 ! ' ' 


: 


i i i ' ' 
i i i i > ' 




i i i ■ • ' 




i i i 1 • ' 



***» 




The D.H. Hill Library with its 11-story book tower houses a collection of 600,000 
volumes, and will seat 2,200 persons. Photocopy service and equipment for read- 
ing microfilm and microcards serves students in all programs. 



SCHOOLS AND 
PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



There are eight major undergraduate academic divisions at North Carolina State 
University. These are the Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, Edu- 
cation, Engineering, Foi'est Resources, Liberal Arts, Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences and Textiles. The programs of study are outlined by school. Information 
concerning specific courses is given in the section of the catalog on course descrip- 
tions. 

In addition to information about the schools, this section contains descriptions 
of the military training program (ROTC), the Graduate School, Continuing Edu- 
cation and Summer Sessions. 

Throughout the programs of study given in this section, departmental codes, 
course numbers and course titles are used. The key to the departmental code 
follows. This key will aid in locating individual courses in the course description 
section. 



60 



CODE NAME 

AC & ALS Agriculture and Life Sciences 

(General Courses) 

ANS Animal Science 

ANT Anthropology 

ARC Architecture 

ART Art 

AS Aerospace Studies (ROTC) 

BAE Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering 

BCH Biochemistry 

BMA Biomathematics 

BO Botany 

BS Biological Sciences 

CE Civil Engineering 

CH Chemistry 

CHE Chemical Engineering 

CS Crop Science 

CHE Chemical Engineering 

CSC Computer Science 

DN Design 

E Engineering (General Courses) 

EC Economics 

ED Education (General Courses)* 

EE Electrical Engineering 

EH Engineering Honors 

EM Engineering Mechanics 

ENG English 

ENT Entomology 

EO Engineering Operations 

FOR Forest Resources** 

FS Food Science 

GN Genetics 

GY Geology 

HI History 

HS Horticultural Science 

IA Industrial Arts 

IE Industrial Engineering 

ISO International Student 
Orientation 

LAR Landscape Architecture 

MA Mathematics 

MAE Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering 



MAS 


Marine Sciences 


MAT 


Materials Engineering 


MB 


Microbiology 


MLE 


English (Foreign Students) 


MLF 


French 


MLG 


German 


MLI 


Italian 


MLR 


Russian 


MLS 


Spanish 


MS 


Military Science (ROTC) 


MUS 


Music 


MY 


Meteorology 


NE 


Nuclear Engineering 


NTR 


Nutrition 


OR 


Operations Research 


OY 


Physical Oceanography 


PD 


Product Design 


PE 


Physical Education 


PHI 


Philosophy 


PHY 


Physiology 


PMS 


Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences (General Course) 


PO 


Poultry Science 


PP 


Plant Pathology 


PS 


Politics 


PSY 


Psychology 


PY 


Physics 


REL 


Religion 


RRA 


Recreation Resources 




Administration 


SOC 


Sociology 


SP 


Speech 


ssc 


Soil Science 


ST 


Statistics 


T 


Textiles (General Courses) 


TC 


Textile Chemistry 


TOX 


Toxicology 


TX 


Textile Technology 


UD 


Urban Design 


UNI 


University Studies 


WPS 


Wood and Paper Science and 
Technology 



zo 



Zoology 



* This includes Adult and Community College 
Personnel Services, Industrial and Technical 
tion. 
** This includes Conservation and Forestry. 



Education, Agricultural Education, Guidance and 
Education, and Mathematics and Science Educa- 



61 




Principles of science and business learned in the classroom and labora- 
tory lead to hundreds of occupations in modern agriculture and life 
sciences. 



A botany class participates in field identification techniques. 




AGRICULTURE AND 
LIFE SCIENCES 



Patterson Hall 

J. E. Legates, Dean 

E. W. Glazener, Director- of Academic Affairs 

Modern agriculture is a complex industry built on the principles of science and 
business. The basic sciences are the foundations for modern agricultural tech- 
nology. These sciences applied to understanding the functions of living material 
offer a background as preparation for a professional agriculturist, environmentalist, 
or as a preparatory program for the medical and health related sciences. Likewise, 
the principles of economics and sociology provide background preparation for 
agricultural business management and public service aspects of society. 

The objects of the academic program are as follows: 

(1) To provide an opportunity for a broad university education. 

(2) To provide a variety of learning experiences. 

(3) To offer a choice of specialization, sufficient for initial employment. 

(4) To provide background for graduate or professional programs. 

A high percentage of all the gainfully employed persons in the United States are 
engaged in operations directly or indirectly related to food and fiber. For example, 
the food industry ranges from those who produce the food, supply material to the 
producer, and process the finished product to those who sell the products to the 
consumer. Hundreds of distinct occupations are represented in modern agriculture 
and biology. The demand for graduates is strong. 

FACILITIES 

North Carolina State University is fortunate to have at its disposal the newest 
equipment and facilities in many fields. Laboratories are well equipped 
with modern equipment, such as an electron microscope, and with the necessary 
materials for learning and practicing the basic and applied sciences. Machinery 
and equipment, in some cases provided by private industry, keep students abreast 
of the latest technological advances. Extensive plant, animal and insect collections 
are available for teaching and research. 

The D. H. Hill Library at North Carolina State University has a large collection 
of scientific books and periodicals which provide excellent source material for 
courses. In addition, students may draw from the specialized periodicals and text- 
books in the departmental libraries. 

Research stations of the University provide a practical classroom for many 
courses as well as a place where researchers can carry on basic and applied research. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Students in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences have ample opportunities 
to take part in broadening extracurricular activities. Most departments have 
student organizations which provide professional as well as social experience. 
Representatives of these clubs form the Agri-Life Council. This council is the 
student organization representing the school. Student tours provide an opportunity 
to see firsthand the application of classroom principles. In addition, students 
representing agronomy, animal science, horticultural science, food science, 
poultry science and soil science compete regionally and nationally in a number of 
activities providing student members a chance to learn by travel as well as by 
participation. 



63 



CURRICULA OFFERINGS AND REQUIREMENTS 

A freshman enrolling in agriculture and life sciences has a common core of 
courses the first year, courses that are appropriate in all curricula. This method 
allows the student time to study various programs before selecting a curricula in 
science (agricultural or biological), business or technology. In addition to the 
basic courses in English, biology, and physical and social sciences, the student 
selects a major in a department, an interdisciplinary program or an individualized 
course plan. 

Departmental majors are offered in three general curricula as follows: 

Science — agricultural economics, animal science, biological and agricultural 
engineering (joint program with the School of Engineering), botany, crop science, 
entomology, food science, horticultural science, medical technology, poultry science, 
rural sociology, soil science, wildlife biology and zoology. Premedical sciences are 
offered in this curriculum. 

Business — emphasis on economics, combination programs in technology in 
animal science, crop science, horticultural science, poultry science and soil science. 

Technology — biological and agricultural engineering, animal science, food 
science, horticultural science and poultry science. 

Interdepartmental and Interdisciplinary Programs— These curricula offer the 
opportunity to select broad curriculum majors that involve two or more depart- 
ments or schools: 

Biological Sciences — A curriculum with emphasis on biological and physical 
sciences, especially designed for graduate or professional courses requiring a 
biology background. 

Conservation — A curriculum concentrating on the use, preservation and im- 
provement of natural resources. Administered jointly by the School of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences and the School of Forest Resources. 

Plant Protection — A curriculum with emphasis on the application of chemical 
and biological principles in the control of plant diseases, insects and weeds. The 
curriculum is administered by the Departments of Entomology, Crop Science 
and Plant Pathology. 

Agronomy — A technical curriculum dealing with the fundamentals of crop 
production and soil management. The curriculum is administered by the Depart- 
ments of Crop Science and Soil Science. 

Individualized Study Program — an experimental program with the student 
planning his curriculum assisted by a faculty advisory committee. 

In addition to these formal programs, a number of arrangements that offer two 
areas of concentration are available according to the interest of the student. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 

The School of Agriculture and Life Sciences has a comprehensive Honors 
Program for qualified freshmen and sophomores interested in participating in 
seminar discussion programs on broad topics. These sessions are led by outstanding 
professors. 

Qualified juniors and seniors have an opportunity to participate in an independ- 
ent research program. Faculty direction is provided on an individual basis to each 
student. The student has the opportunity to select his project. 

DEGREES 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon the satisfactory completion 
of one of the curricula in this school. 

The degrees of Master of Science, Master of Agriculture and Master of Life 



64 



Sciences are offered in the various departments of agriculture and life sciences 
after satisfactory completion of at least one year of graduate study in residence. 
The latter two are referred to as "professional degree programs" in the sections 
on graduate study. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered by the following departments: 
economics, biological and agricultural engineering, animal science, biochemistry, 
crop science, botany, microbiology, entomology, food science, genetics, horticul- 
ture, nutrition, plant pathology, sociology and anthropology, soil science and zoology. 

Further information on graduate offerings may be found in the Graduate School 
Catalog. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Broad and fascinating opportunities in business, industry, education and govern- 
ment are open to graduates of agriculture and life sciences. Some of the areas 
in which graduates are employed are: 

Business and Industry — banking and credit, insurance, farm management, 
cooperatives, land appraisal, marketing, transportation, food chains, food 
packing, machinery and equipment, chemicals, fertilizer, feed manufacturing, 
seed processing. 

Communications — writing, reporting, radio, television, newspapers, maga- 
zines, advertising, publications. 

Conservation — soil, water, range, forest, fish, wildlife parks, recreation. 

Education — high school and college instruction in agriculture or biology, agri- 
cultural extension, governmental, and industrial agencies. 

Farming and Ranching — general livestock, field crops, fruits, vegetables, poultry, 
ornamentals. 

Preprofessional and Graduate Preparation — premedical programs for training 
for medical, dental and veterinary colleges, graduate programs. 

Research — production, marketing, engineering, processing, conservation, organi- 
zational structure, group behavior. 

Services — inspection and regulation, production field service, health 
services, quality control and grading, agricultural technology and consulting. 

A placement office as a part of the University Career Planning and Placement 
Center is maintained to assist graduates in career development and placement. 

INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS 

An International Seminar is offered to those students who are interested. In 
addition, an International Option, requiring modern language and 12 semester 
hours of appropriate courses in the social sciences, is available for interested 
students enrolled in any curricula. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

The curricula in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences have a common 
freshman year with the exception of the science program in biological and agri- 
cultural engineering. For the agricultural science, biological and agricultural 
engineering freshman year, see freshman year in the School of Engineering. 



65 



Fall Semester Credits 

ALS 103 Orientation 1 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective .... 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry* 4 

Physical Education 1 

(Military Science or Air Science may 
be elected) 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A . 4 

or 
MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics .... 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

Physical Education 1 

(Military Science or Air Science may 
be elected) 

14-15 



* Does not contribute to the 130 semester hours required in the biological sciences curriculum. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES* 

Science, business and technology are three curricula offered in this school. 
All departments offer the science curriculum. Several departments offer the 
choice of either science or technology. In addition, several departments are partici- 
pating in interdisciplinary programs. 

A business curriculum is offered in agricultural economics or in combination with 
the technology curriculum in animal science, crop science, horticultural science, 
poultry science and soil science. 

All the curricula have a core of required courses on a school basis. Courses 
peculiar to a specific department are listed under the departmental requirements. 
Listed below are the required courses by curriculum on a school basis. 



SCIENCE 

Credits 
ALS 103 Orientation 1 

Languages 
(12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Electives (English or Modern Language) .... 6 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Electives from Group D 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(28-32 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Biological Sciences Elective 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 



MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A . 4 

or 
MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics .... 3 
PY 221 College Physics 5 

or 
PY 211, PY 212 General Physics 8 

Electives 

(60-64 Credits) 

Restricted Electives from Group A 22-26 

Departmental Requirements and Electives . .26 
Free Electives . . .' 12 

Subtotal 126 

Physical Education 4 

Total Hours for Graduation 130** 



BUSINESS 

Accounting: Credits 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

Financial Reporting 3 

EC 261 Accounting II — Financial 

Information Systems 3 

EC 262 Managerial Uses of Cost Data ... 3 
EC 360 Financial Reporting Theory & 

Practice I 3 

EC 361 Financial Reporting Theory & 

Practice II 3 



EC 362 Production Cost Analysis & 

Control 3 

EC 460 Specialized Financial Reporting 

Theory and Practice 3 

EC 464 Income Taxation 3 

EC 466 Examination of Financial 

Statements 3 

EC 46« Professional Accountancy 

Resume 3 



66 



Production: 

EC 303 Farm Management 3 

EC 425 Industrial Management 3 

EC 551 Agricultural Production 

Economics 3 

Marketing: 

EC 311 Agricultural Markets 3 

EC 411 Marketing Methods 3 

EC 521 Markets and Trade 3 

Finance: 

EC 402 Financial Institutions 3 

EC 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance .... 3 

EC 420 Corporation Finance 3 



Personnel: 

EC 426 Personnel Management 3 

EC 431 Labor Economics 3 

EC 432 Industrial Relations 3 

Business Management: 

EC 310 Economics of the Firm 3 

EC 525 Management Policy and 

Decision Making 3 

Electives: 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 

EC 302 National Income and Economic 

Welfare 3 

Group B Courses 



Students in the business curriculum complete a minimum of 24 semester hours 
in Group B courses. One course is required in the areas of accounting, production, 
marketing, finance, personnel and management. In addition, two courses are elected 
from Group B course offerings. 

TECHNOLOGY 



Credits 
ALS 103 Orientation 1 

Languages 
(12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Electives (English or Modern Language) .... 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Electives from Group D 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(32-33 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Biological Sciences Elective 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 



CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A . 4 

or 

MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics .... 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Electives 
(59-60 Credits) 

Restricted Electives from Groups 

A, B or C 20-21 

Departmental Requirements and 

Electives 27 

Free Electives 12 

Subtotal 126 

Physical Education 4 

Total Hours for Graduation 130** 



* Group A includes the physical and biological sciences; Group B, economics and business manage- 
ment; Group C, applied science and technology; Group D, social sciences and humanities. 
** All curricula require the completion of one course in literature. 

ELECTIVES 

The following lists provide typical courses that are elected from the four block 
groupings — A, B, C and D. Additional courses may be selected by checking with 
the office of the Director of Academic Affairs. 

GROUP A 



PHYSICAL SCIENCES: 



Biochemistry: 

BCH 351 
BCH 452 

Chemistry: 

CH 107 
CH 220 



Elementary Biochemistry 
Experimental Biochemisti'y 



Principles of Chemistry 
Introductory Organic Chemistry 



CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry 

Computer Science: 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 



67 



CSC 112 
CSC 211 

Geo8cience8 : 

GY 120 
GY 208 
MY 486 

Mathematics: 



Basic Computer Organization 

and Assembly Language 
Programming Languages 



Physical Geology 
Environmental Physical Geology 
Weather and Climate 



Must use one or the other of the following 
two sequences: MA 111. 112. 212 or MA 102, 
201, 202 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 
MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 
MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 



MA 212 



Meteorology: 
MY 411 

Physics : 

PY 223 
PY 407 

Soil Science: 

SSC 200 
SSC 511 
SSC 520 
SSC 522 

Statistics: 

ST 311 
ST 361 



Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus B 
Applied Differential Equations I 



Introductory Meteorology 



Astronomy and Astrophysics 
Introduction to Modern Phsyics 



Soils 

Soil Physics 

Soil and Plant Analysis 

Soil Chemistry 



Introduction to Statistics 
Introduction to Statistics 
for Engineers 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES: 

Animal Science: 

ANS 301 (FS 301, NTR 301) Nutrition 

and Man 
ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology 
ANS 405 Lactation 
ANS 415 (NTR 415, PO 415) Comparative 

Nutrition 
ANS 502 (PHY 502) Reproductive 

Physiology of Vertebrates 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering: 

BAE 303 Energy Conversion for 

Agricultural Production 

Biological Sciences: 

BS 480 Air Pollution Biology 

Botany: 

BO 200 Plant Life 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 

BO 402 (CS 402) Economic Botany 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 

BO 414 (ZO 414) Cell Biology 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 



Entomology: 

ENT 301 
ENT 312 



Introduction to Forest Insects 
Introduction to Economic 

Insects 
ENT 502 Insect Diversity 
ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects 
ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect 

Control 
ENT 562 Agricultural Entomology 
ENT 582 (ZO 582) Medical and 

Veterinary Entomology 

Food Science: 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 

FS 405 (MB 405) Food Microbiology 
FS 506 (MB 506) Advanced Food 
Microbiology 



Genetics: 

GN 504 Human Genetics 

GN 532 (ZO 532) Biological Effects of 

Radiations 
GN 540 (ZO 540) Evolution 

Microbiology: 

MB 401 General Microbiology 

MB 405 (FS 405) Food Microbiology 
MB 506 (FS 506) Advanced Food 

Microbiology 
MB 514 Microbial Metabolism 

MB 571 Virology 

Plant Pathology: 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 

PP 318 (FOR 318) Forest Pathology 

PP 500 Plant Disease Control 

Poultry Science: 

PO 401 Poultry Diseases 

PO 415 (ANS 415, NTR 415) Comparative 

Nutrition 
PO 524 (ZO 524) Comparative 

Endocrinology 

Zoology: 

ZO 201 Animal Life 

ZO 223 Comparative Anatomy 

ZO 315 General Parasitology 

ZO 345 Histology 

ZO 350 Invertebrate Zoology 

ZO 351 Vertebrate Zoology 

ZO 360 (BO 360) Introduction to Ecology 

ZO 361 Vertebrate Embryology 

ZO 414 (BO 414) Cell Biology 

ZO 420 Fishery Science 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 

ZO 441 Ichthyology 

ZO 524 (PO 524) Comparative 

Endocrinology 
ZO 540 (GN 540) Evolution 



68 



GROUP B 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: 



Economics: 
EC 260 

EC 261 



EC 


262 


EC 


301 


EC 


302 


EC 


303 


EC 


310 


EC 


311 


EC 


317 



EC 360 



EC 361 



EC 402 
EC 407 



Accounting I — Concepts of 

Financial Reporting 
Accounting II — Financial 

Information Systems 
Managerial Uses of Cost Data 
Production and Prices 
National Income and 

Economic Welfare 
Farm Management 
Economics of the Firm 
Agricultural Markets 
Introduction to Methods of 

Economic Analysis 
Financial Reporting Theory 

& Practice I 
Financial Reporting Theory 

& Practice II 
Production Cost Analysis & 

Control 
Financial Institutions 
Business Law I 



EC 


408 


Business Law II 


EC 


411 


Marketing Methods 


EC 


415 


Farm Appraisal and Finance 


EC 


420 


Corporation Finance 


EC 


425 


Industrial Management 


EC 


426 


Personnel Management 


EC 


430 


Agricultural Price Analysis 


EC 


431 


Labor Economics 


EC 


432 


Industrial Relations 


EC 


440 


Economic Development 


EC 


460 


Specialized Financial 

Reporting Theory and Practice 


EC 


464 


Income Taxation 


EC 


466 


Examination of Financial 
Statements 


EC 


468 


Professional Accountancy 
Resume 


Mathematics: 




MA 


122 


Mathematics of Finance and 



Elementary Statistics 



GROUP C 



APPLIED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 



Agricultural Communications: 

AC 311 Communications Methods and 

Media 

Animal Science: 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science 
ANS 204 Livestock Feeds and Feeding 
ANS 302 Selecting Dairy and Meat 

Animals 
ANS 308 Advanced Selecting Dairy 

and Meat Animals 
ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 
ANS 403 Swine Management 
ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 
ANS 406 Sheep Management 
ANS 409 (FS 409) Meat and Meat Products 
ANS 410 Horse Management 
ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of 

Domestic Animals 
ANS 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 
ANS 508 (GN 508) Genetics of Animal 

Improvement 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering: 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery 

BAE 321 Irrigation Terracing and 

Erosion Control 
BAE 331 (FS 331) Food Engineering 
BAE 332 Farm Structures 
BAE 341 Farm Electrification and 

Utilities 
BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery 
BAE 433 Crop Preservation and 

Processing 



Crop Science: 

CS 211 
CS 311 
CS 312 
CS 315 
CS 413 



Crop Science 

Field Crop Production 

Pastures and Forage Crops 

Turf Management 

Plant Breeding 



CS 414 Weed Science 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of 

Crop Production 
CS 514 (HS 514) Principles and Methods 

in Weed Science 

Food Science: 

FS 331 (BAE 331) Food Engineering 
FS 404 (PO 404) Poultry Products 
FS 409 (ANS 409) Meat and Meat 
Products 

Horticultural Science: 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 

HS 301 Plant Propagation 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 

HS 421 Fruit Production 

HS 432 Vegetable Production 

HS 441, HS 442 Floriculture I and II 

Poultry Science: 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production 

PO 301 Evaluation of Live Poultry 

PO 351 Grading and Evaluation of 

Poultry Products 
PO 402 Commercial Poultry Enterprises 

PO 404 (FS 404) Poultry Products 
PO 520 (GN 520) Poultry Breeding 



Soil Science: 

SSC 341 
SSC 452 
SSC 461 
SSC 462 
SSC 472 



Zoology: 

ZO 212 
ZO 221 



Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 
Soil Classification 
Soil and Water Conservation 
Soil Management Systems 
Forest Soils 



Basic Anatomy and Physiology 
Conservation of Natural 
Resources 



69 



GROUP D 

SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES: 

The student is required to complete 21 semester hours of Group D courses in all 
degree programs. Not more than six semester hours are to come from one depart- 
mental area. It is strongly recommended that the student be exposed to courses in 
each of the major course areas outlined below, although the final selection is with 
the student and his adviser. 



AREA I 

Anthropology : 
All courses 

Economics : 

EC 205 Economic Activity 

EC 206 Price System 

EC 212 Economics of Agriculture 

EC 370 (HI 370) The Rise of Industrialism 

EC 410 Public Finance and Fiscal 

Policy 
EC 413 Competition, Monopoly and 

Public Policy 
EC 441 Agricultural Development in 

Foreign Countries 
EC 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas 

EC 448 International Economics 

EC 470 (HI 470) Evolution of the 

American Economy 
EC 475 Comparative Economic Systems 

Psychology : 
All courses 

Sociology : 
All courses 



AREA II 

History: 
All courses 

Politics: 
All courses 

Social Studies: 
All courses 

University Studies: 
All courses 

AREA III 

Art: 

All courses 

English: 

Literature courses only 

Modern Language: 

Courses numbered 200 and above 

Music: 

Courses number 200 and above 

Philosophy : 
All courses 

Religion: 
All courses 



ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION 

(Also see education.) 

The adult and community college education faculty offers instruction primarily 
at the graduate level. The department is jointly administered by the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences and the School of Education. For details, see the 
School of Education, pages 129-130. 



AGRONOMY 

(See crop science and soil science, pages 85 or 107.) 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Polk Hall 

Professor I. D. Porterfield, Head of the Department 



70 



TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: E. R. Barrick, E. G. Batte, A. J. Clawson, L. Goode, J. M. Leather- 
wood, J. G. Lecce, J. E. Legates, B. T. McDaniel, R. D. Mochrie, H. A. 
Ramsey, H. A. Schneider, F. H. Smith, L. C. Ulberg, G. H. Wise; Adjunct 
Professor: J. H. Gainer; Professors Emeriti: C. D. Grinnells, H. A. Stewart; 
Associate Professors: E. V. Caruolo, D. G. Davenport, E. U. Dillard, E. J. 
Eisen, R. W. Harvey, E. E. Jones, J. J. McNeill, D. J. Moncol, R. M. 
Myers, A. H. Rakes, O. W. Robison, J. C. Wilk; Assistant Professors: 
J. A. Coalson, B. H. Johnson, W. L. Johnson (Peru); Adjunct Assistant 
Professor: B. D. Harrington; Assistant Professor Emeritus: J. L. Moore; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: G. Matrone, S. B. Tove (Biochemistry); 
C. H. Hill (Poultry Science); H. J. Gold (Statistics) 

EXTENSION 

Professor A. V. Allen, In Charge, Animal Husbandry Extension 
Professor M. E. Senger. In Charge, Dairy Husbandry Extension 
Associate Professor D. G. Spruill, In Charge, Swine Husbandry Extension 
Professors: R. F. Behlow, T. C. Blalock, J. S. Buchanan, G. Hyatt Jr., G. S. 
Parsons, J. W. Patterson, J. R. Woodard; Associate Professors: J. R. Jones, 
F. N. Knott, F. D. Sargent, C. M. Stanislaw; Assistant Professors: G. B. 
Creed, D. P. Wesen; Assistant Professor Emeritus: R. R. Rich; Extension 
Dairy Husbandry Specialist Emeritus: J. A. Arey; Instructors: K. R. BUTCHER, 
C. M. Reese 

Undergraduate students in animal science study subjects related to various 
phases of animal industry. Training is provided in nutrition, physiology, breeding 
and disease and there are opportunities for the application of basic scientific 
training in the husbandry areas. Options for course selection by each student 
make it possible for those with varying backgrounds and wide-ranging interests 
to become involved in training that will be stimulating and rewarding. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

There are many opportunities for students majoring in animal science. These 
include farm, dairy and livestock management careers, jobs as fieldmen for breed 
association and livestock organizations, agricultural extension, educational work 
in business and industries serving agriculture, meat grading, agricultural communi- 
cations in animal science, feed manufacturing, sales work in feeds and equipment, 
marketing dairy cattle and dairy products, and supervising livestock and farm 
loans with banks and lending agencies. Many students in veterinary science obtain 
degrees in animal science as well. In addition, students may elect further study 
at the graduate level, after which they will find opportunities in teaching, research 
and development. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in animal science may be obtained 
under any of the three curricula offered by the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. For the basic requirements and freshman year see pages 65-70. 

CURRICULA IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

BUSINESS PROGRAM 

This curriculum is selected by students desiring a background in business with a 
technical knowledge of animal science. The program requires the completion of 
courses in the technology curriculum, page 67, and the economic and business 
courses as outlined on page 69. 

71 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

See the typical curriculum, beginning on page 72, below. 



Departmental Requirements 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science . . 4 

ANS 490 Animal Science Seminar 1 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

Departmental Electives 6 



Minimum of nine credits from the following 
courses: 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology 3 

ANS 405 Lactation 3 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of 

Domestic Animals 3 

ANS 415 (NTR 415, PO 415) 

Comparative Nutrition 3 

ANS 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 
See typical curriculum on page 73. 

Departmental 
Requirements 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science . . 4 
ANS 204 Livestock Feeds and Feeding .... 3 

ANS 490 Animal Science Seminar 1 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

Departmental Elective 3 

Minimum of nine credits from the following 
courses: 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology 3 

ANS 405 Lactation 3 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of 

Domestic Animals 3 



ANS 415 (NTR 415, PO 415) 

Comparative Nutrition 3 

ANS 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 

Minimum of five credits from the following 
courses: 

ANS 302 Selecting Dairy and Meat 

Animals 2 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 3 

ANS 403 Swine Management 3 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 3 

ANS 406 Sheep Management 3 

ANS 410 Horse Management 3 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

For the freshman year see pages 65-66. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester Credits 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science . . 4 
CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry* 

or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B 

or 

Group A Elective 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



Second Semester Credits 

ANS 204 Livestock Feeds & Feeding 3 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 
or 

Group A Elective 4 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Physical Education 1 



L6 



The student's choice of CH 220 or CH 221 is dependent upon his previous completion of either 
CH 103, General Chemistry IL or CH 107, Principles of Chemistry. 



First Semester 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

Social Science & Humanities Electives 6 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

Free Elective 4 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Second Semester Credits 

ANS 409 (FS 409) Meat & Meat Products . . 3 
ANS 415 (NTR 415. PO 415) 

Comparative Nutrition 3 

ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

16 MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

16 



72 



First Semester 



ANS 411 Breeding & Improvement of 

Domestic Animals 3 

ANS 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 

Animal Science Elective 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Free Electives 5-6 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Second Semester 

ANS 401 

ANS 402 

ANS 403 

ANS 490 



17-18 



Credits 



Reproductive Physiology 3 

Beef Cattle Management 3 

Swine Management 3 

Animal Science Seminar 1 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Total Hours for Graduation 



16 

.130 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

For the freshman year see pages 65-66. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 



Credits 



ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science . . 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Second Semester Credits 

ANS 204 Livestock Feeds & Feeding 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry ... 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



First Semester 

ANS 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 



ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Free Elective 4 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Second Semester 

ANS 302 Selecting Daily and Meat 



Credits 



Animals 2 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 3 

CS 312 Pastures & Forage Crops 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



IT 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester Credits 

ANS 308 Advanced Selecting Dairy & 

Meat Animals 1 

ANS 410 Horse Management 3 

ANS 411 Breeding & Improvement of 

Domestic Animals 3 

Social Science & Humanities Electives 6 

Free Electives 5-6 

18-19 



Second Semester Credits 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology 3 

ANS 403 Swine Management 3 

ANS 409 (FS 409) Meat & Meat Products . 3 

ANS 490 Animal Science Seminar 1 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 
Financial Reporting 
or 

Group A, B or C Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Total Hours for Graduation 130 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers the Master of Science, a professional master's program 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, 
animal biochemistry and nutrition, animal diseases, animal physiology and animal 
breeding. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



73 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

Polk Hall 

Professor Gennard Matrons, Head of the Department 

Professors: F. B. Armstrong, H. R. Horton, J. S. Kahn, I. S. Longmuir, A. R. Main, 
S. B. Tove; Associate Professor: E. C. Sisler; Assistant Professors: J. A. 
Knopp, Elizabeth C. Theil, Associate Members of the Faculty: L. W. 
Aurand (Food Science), J. Bordner, S. G. Levine, W. P. Tucker (Chemistry), 
E. G. Jones (Animal Science) 

The Department of Biochemistry offers instruction at the undergraduate and 
graduate levels. Undergraduate courses are designed to provide students from a 
number of curricula with a fundamental background in the science of biochemistry. 
The graduate program is designed to train scientists for research and teaching 
careers in biochemistry and related fields. 

The Department of Biochemistry is jointly administered by the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences and the School of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The Department offers an undergraduate curriculum leading to the B.S. degree 
in the biological sciences with an emphasis in biochemistry. See below and page 68. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CURRICULUM 

BIOCHEMISTRY EMPHASIS 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 107 PrinciDles of Chemistry 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II 



MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A . . 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

ALS 103 Orientation 1 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 



MA 212 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B .3-4 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Physical Education 1 

15-16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CH 221 
MA 202 



Organic Chemistry I 4 

Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 



MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics .. .3-4 

Modern Foreign Language 3 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

Physical Education 1 

15-16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Modern Foreign Language 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

15 



Fall Semester 



MA 301 
CH 428 



CH 315 
PY 211 



Applied Differential Equations I 
Qualitative Organic Analysis 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Crediis Spring Semester Credits 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

CH 431 



Quantitative Analysis 3-4 

General Physics 4 



PY 205 General Physics 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology . 4 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

17-18 



Physical Chemistry I 3-4 



or 
CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry 
PY 212 General Physics 4 

or 
PY 208 General Physics 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 
Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 



74 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BCH 452 Experimental Biochemistry 3 MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 

or or 

Free Elective 3 CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 

BO 421 Plant Physiology or 

or Mathematics Elective 2-3 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology Social Science and Humanities Electives .... 6 

or Free Electives 3-4 

ZO 414 (BO 414) Cell Biology 3-4 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3-4 Total Hours for Graduation 130 

15-17 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Biochemistry offers programs of study leading to the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Prospective students should consult 
the Graduate School Catalog for additional information. 



BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

(Also see engineering.) 
David S. Weaver Laboratories 
Professor F. J. Hassler, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: H. D Bowen, J. W. DICKENS (USDA), J. M. FORE, D. H. HOWELLS, 
W. H. Johnson, C. W. Suggs; Professor Emeriti: G. W. Giles, J. W. Weaver, 
Jr.; Associate Professors: G. B. Blum, Jr., J. D. Hesketh (USDA), R. G. 
Holmes, E. L. Howell, B. K. Huang, E. G. Humphries, W. F. McClure, R. P. 
Rohrback, T. B. Whitaker (USDA), C. R. Willey (USDA), R. E. Williamson 
(USDA), E. H. Wiser, J. H. Young; Assistant Professors: C. F. Abrams, Jr., 
G. R. Baughman, F. J. Humenik, M. R. Overcash, R. W. Skaggs, R. S. Sowell; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: D. D. Hamann, V. A. Jones (Food Science) 

EXTENSION 

Associate Professor G. J. Kriz, Associate Head in Charge of Extension 

Professor Emeritus: H. M. Ellis; Associate Professors: L. B. Driggers, J. W. 
Glover, W. C. Warrick, R. W. Watkins; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. C. 
Ferguson; Assistant Professors: E. O. Beasley, R. E. Sneed 

Students in biological and agricultural engineering are educated and trained to 
deal with problems of agriculture that are engineering in nature. Involved are the 
application of scientific and engineering principles to the conservation and utiliza- 
tion of water and soil, the development of power and labor-saving devices for all 
phases of agricultural production, the design of structures and equipment for hous- 
ing and handling livestock and field products, and the processing and marketing of 
farm products. 

The need for men to carry out the technical aspects such as development and 
research as well as less technical work, such as sales and service of farm equipment, 
requires the offering of two distinct curricula as described below. 

The curricula lead to the Bachelor of Science degree. 



75 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Persons trained in biological and agricultural engineering under the science 
curriculum are qualified for positions in design development and research in public 
institutions and in industry and for teaching and extension work in institutions of 
higher education. The curriculum also provides adequate training for post-graduate 
work leading to advanced degrees. 

Those trained in the field of agricultural engineering technology are qualified 
for positions in sales and service of agricultural equipment such as farm machinery, 
irrigation systems, etc.; as county agents or farmers; and for farm advisory work 
with such organizations as electric power companies. 

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

This curriculum, offered in conjunction with the School of Engineering, is 
designed to develop young people capable of engineering leadership in agriculture. 
Emphasis is placed on basic science courses such as mathematics, physics, mechan- 
ics, biology, soils, and thermodynamics, which provide a sound background for 
engineering and agricultural technology. Courses in biological and agricultural 
engineering are directed to those methods of thought and techniques whereby 
science can be applied with understanding and judgment to engineering situations 
in agricultural operations. General agriculture courses are provided in order that 
the student can better understand the agricultural industry with which one deals. 

Since biological and agricultural engineering involves two distinct technical 
fields — agriculture and engineering — this curriculum is a joint responsibility of the 
two schools and is so administered. Graduates in the program receive the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

For the freshman year program in agricultural engineering science, refer to the 
common freshman year in the School of Engineering, page 148. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

BAE 251 Elements of Biological & 

Agricultural Engineering 3 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

EM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



EM 307 Mechanics of Solids 3 

BAE 391 Electrotechnology in Biological 

& Agricultural Engineering 3 

BAE 361 Analytical Methods 3 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I . 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

BAE 342 Agricultural Processing 4 

BAE 462 Functional Design of Field 

Machines 3 

BAE 381 Agricultural Structures & 

Environment 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



L6 



76 



Fall Semester 

BAE 451 Agricultural Engineering 



Design I 3 

BAE 472 Agricultural Water 

Management 4 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 6 

Free Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BAE 452 Agricultural Engineering 

Design II 3 

Advised Technical Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 6 



16 



15 



Total Hours for Graduation 129 



Social science and humanities electives will be taken according to the standard 
engineering school listing. 

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING 

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

This curriculum is designed for those who are working on a practical level with 
farm people. Graduates are equipped to apply to the farm the new technology as 
developed and revealed by the research engineer. The courses are presented and 
directed toward the solution of consumer problems with emphasis on the techniques 
employed. Graduates from this program will receive the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Agriculture. 

Listed below are the departmental requirements in the technology program and 
a typical curriculum in this program. 



Departmental Requirements* (26 Credits) 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery 4 

BAE 303 Energy Conversion for 

Agricultural Production 2 

BAE 321 Irrigation, Terracing, and 

Erosion Control 3 

BAE 331 (FS 331) Food Engineering 3 



BAE 332 Farm Structures 3 

BAE 341 Farm Electrification and 

Utilities 3 

BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery 3 

BAE 433 Crop Preservation and 

Processing 3 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

TECHNOLOGY 



For the freshman year see page 67. 



Fall Semester 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 



BAE 211 Farm Machinery 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

PY 211 General Physics* 4 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



BAE 341 Farm Electrification & 

Utilities 3 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Fall Semester 



BAE 331 (FS 331) Food Engineering 3 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

Social Science & Humanities Elec 6 

English Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

BAE 303 Energy Conversion for 



Credits 



Agricultural Production 2 

BAE 321 Irrigation, Terracing & 

Erosion Control 3 

Free Elective 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elec 6 

Group A, B, or C Electives 3 



17 



77 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BAE 433 Crop Preservation & BAE 332 Farm Structures 3 

Processing 3 BAE 411 Farm Power & Machinery 3 

Free Elective '.'. 3 Free Electives 3 

Group A. B, or C Elective 9 Group A, B, or C Electives 6 



Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

18 



15 
Total Hours for Graduation 130 



* PY 211, 212 will be taken in place of PY 221 as shown in the agricultural technology curriculum. 
These three additional credits are Group A electives required by the department. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers programs of study for the Master of Science, Doctor of 
Philosophy and Master of Biological and Agricultural Engineering degrees. Pro- 
spective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Gardner Hall 

C. F. Lytle, Major Adviser 

The biological sciences curriculum is an interdepartmental program designed to 
serve the needs of students desiring a comprehensive training in biology rather than 
specialization in some specific field of the biological sciences. It is especially suit- 
able for students preparing for graduate study in a specialized field of biology as 
well as for students planning to teach high school biology. Also, students preparing 
for careers in business or industry and wishing a broad, general training in biology 
may find the biological sciences curriculum suitable. 

Experience has indicated one of the best preparations for graduate study in 
biology is a broad training in the basic biological sciences supplemented with a 
strong background in the physical sciences and supporting areas. The biological 
sciences curriculum incorporates these features and provides the student with 
maximum flexibility and options for specialization at the graduate level. 

Because of its emphasis on a strong preparation in the physical and biological 
sciences and on preparation for graduate study, the biological sciences curriculum is 
a rigorous program requiring several courses in chemistry, physics, mathematics 
and foreign language. Those students whose interests and aptitudes fall primarily in 
a specific area of the biological sciences should elect one of the departmental majors 
such as botany, zoology or entomology. 

Students wishing to concentrate their studies within a specific field can do so in 
the biological sciences curriculum by selecting appropriate free and restricted 
elective courses in consultation with their advisers. Such programs within the bio- 
logical sciences curriculum are available to provide emphasis in biochemistry, 
botany, entomology, microbiology, zoology and biology teaching. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
CURRICULUM 

Credits Physical Sciences and Mathematics 

ALS 103 Orientation 1 (S4-S6 Credits) 

Languages (12 Credits) MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics .... 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 »,? a I ( ; U > luS A A ,1I"« ; j 

w j i ,„„„ , ,. c MA 212 Analytic Geometry and 

Modern Language (200 level) 6 V; 7 i r. ■* 

Calculus B 6 

Social Sciences and Humanities or 

(21 Credits) MA 102 Analytic Geometry and 

Electives 21 Calculus I 4 

78 



MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

Biological Sciences 
(31 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

or 
ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 



BO 414 (ZO 414) Cell Biology 3-4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology . . 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 1 

Electives 
(25-27 Credits) 
Restricted Electives from Groups A, 

B, C and D 13-15 

Free Electives 12 

Subtotal 126 
Physical Education 4 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



TYPICAL PROGRAMS IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CURRICULUM 

GENERAL 



For freshman year see pages 65-66. 



SOPHOMORE 



Fall Semester 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 
Calculus A 



Credits 



MA 102 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus B 
or 
MA 201 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus II 3-4 

Physical Education 1 

15-16 



Fall Semester 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology . . 4 

Modern Language (200 level) 3 

Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



JUNIOR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 1 

Modern Language (200 level) 3 

Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 



17 



17 



Fall Semester 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

or 
ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 



SENIOR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Free Electives 9 

Restricted Electives 3 



BO 414 (ZO 414) Cell Biology 3-4 

Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 

Restricted Electives 11-12 



Total Hours for Graduation 



18-19 



BIOCHEMISTRY EMPHASIS 

For a typical curriculum in the biological sciences, biochemistry emphasis, see 
pages 74-75. 



79 



MICROBIOLOGY EMPHASIS 
For freshman year see pages 65-66. 



Fall Semester 



SOPHOMORE 

Credits Spring Semester 



Modern Language (200 level) 3 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Credits 



Modern Language (200 level) 3 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



Fall Semester 

PY 211 General Physics 4 



JUNIOR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
PY 212 General Physics 4 



BO 414 (ZO 414) Cell Biology 3 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology . . 4 
Social Science or Humanities Electives 6 



18 



GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 



15 



Fall Semester 

BCH 452 Experimental Biochemistry 3 



MB 501 Advanced Microbiology 4 

Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 

Restricted Elective 6-7 



SENIOR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MB 514 Microbiology Metabolism 4 

Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 

Free Electives 9 



16-17 



L6 



Total Hours for Graduation 130 



TEACHING 

For freshman year see pages 65-66. 



Fall Semester 



SOPHOMORE 

Credits Spring Semester 



MA 212 Analytical Geometry 

Calculus B 3 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Credits 



ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching Math 

and Science* 3 

Social Science and Humanities Electives .... 6 

Physical Education 1 



18 



JUNIOR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

ED 344 Secondary Education* 3 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 4 

BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology 3 

Modern Language (200 level) 3 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 1 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

Modern Language (200 level) 3 



17 



80 



SENIOR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance* 2 MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

ED 475 Methods of Teaching Science* 3 Restricted Electives 8 

ED 476 Student Teaching in Science* 8 Social Science or Humanity Elective 3 

ED 477 Developing and Selecting — 

Teaching Materials in Science* 2 15 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescence 2 

17 



Total Hours for Graduation 130 



* These courses (total of 18 credit hours) must be selected in lieu of certain free and restricted 
electives to complete requirements for a teaching certificate. 



BOTANY 

Gardner Hall 

Professor G. R. Noggle, Head of the Department 

Professors: A. W. Cooper (on leave), R. J. Downs, J. W. Hardin, A. Krochmal 
(USFS), J. R. Troyer; Adjunct Professors: W. W. Heck, J. A. Yarbrough; 
Professors Emeriti: D. B. Anderson, H. T. Scofield, B. W. Wells, L. A. 
Whitford: Associate Professors: C. E. Anderson, R. C. Fites, R. T. Moore, 
H. E. Pattee (USDA), H. E. Schlichting Jr., H. Seltmann (USDA), R. E. 
Williamson (USDA); Adjunct Associate Professors: D. W. De Jong, H. L. 
Lewis; Assistant Professors: U. Blum, S. D. Koch, E. D. Seneca, C. G. Van 
Dyke, A. M. Witherspoon; Instructor: Linda M. Stroud; Associate Members 
of the Faculty: J. S. Kahn (Biochemistry), D. E. Moreland (USDA Crop 
Science), R. J. Thomas (Wood and Paper Science), D. H. Timothy (Crop Sci- 
ence, Genetics), B. J. Copeland (Zoology) 

The instructional program in the department provides classroom, laboratory, 
and field experience in the major areas of plant science. Undergraduates majoring 
in botany are given a broad background in the humanities and physical sciences, 
and are encouraged to participate in independent study in their senior year. Majors 
are prepared for advanced study in botany and other biological fields, as well as 
in the applied plant sciences such as horticulture, crop science, resource manage- 
ment, pest management and environmental biology. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Many majors in the department elect to continue advanced studies in botany 
leading to the Master of Life Sciences, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. There is need for persons with training in botany for teaching positions in 
community and junior colleges, colleges and universities, for research positions in 
federal and state government laboratories and in private industry. 

Recent federal and state legislation has created a need for botanists in 
environmental quality studies. Positions are open to persons with a Bachelor of 
Science degree to work in air and water quality control programs, in air pollution 
and in environmental impact studies. Field botanists and naturalists also are 
needed in park systems and nature programs. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in botany is offered under the science 
curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The program for the 
freshman year is shown on pages 65-66, and the other basic requirements are 
listed on pages 66-70. 

81 



The Bachelor of Science degree with double concentration — one in economics, 
English, history, philosophy, politics and another in botany — is available in the 
School of Liberal Arts. See pages 196-197 for details. 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN BOTANY 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

Language Electives 6 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

Physical Education 2 

31 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry ... 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 

Social Science and Humanities Electives .... 6 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Science Elective 4 

Electives 8 

35 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology . 4 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Social Science and Humanities Electives .... 6 
Electives 16 

34 
Total Hours for Graduation 130 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers a professional master's program, the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Those interested in the departmental graduate 
program should consult the head of the department or the Graduate School catalog. 



CONSERVATION 

(Also see forest resources.) 

Williams, Gardner and Biltmore Halls 

M. G. Cook, Major Adviser, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
L. C. Saylor, Major Adviser, School of Forest Resources 

Conservation is the wise use, preservation or improvement of natural re- 
sources, without waste for the long-time benefit of man. This degree program in 
conservation is offered jointly by the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences and 
by the School of Forest Resources. Faculty members in botany, entomology, forestry, 
plant pathology, recreational resources administration, soil science, and wildlife 
are directly involved in various aspects of education in conservation. 

Rapid urbanization and industrialization plus an increase in population are 
bringing increased pressures on the use of land areas for recreation as well as food, 
fiber and wood production. These trends create an acute need for people trained to 
make sound judgments in the management of natural resources. 

Conservationists must be able to view problems from several aspects rather than 
from a narrow vision. This phase of conservation has been called a philosophy 



82 



rather than a discipline. However, for the conservationist to apply this philosophy 
to problem-solving in a modern society, he must be well-trained in the basic con- 
cepts of several disciplines. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Needed in increasing numbers are conservationists who are trained in the 
management of (1) wildlands for water, fish and game production, (2) intensively 
used agricultural and forested areas, and (3) areas of concentrated human habita- 
tion. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

Students will enroll in either of the two schools depending on the primary area 
of interest in conservation. The freshman common core of courses for either school 
is acceptable. All students will take a prescribed core of subjects in conservation. 
Students desiring a strong background in a particular area may obtain a dual degree 
by the appropriate use of electives. Specialists in soils, wildlife biology, forest 
management and other selected areas are developed through the proper choice of 



REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE COURSES IN CONSERVATION 



Requirements 

Credits 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management. 3 

GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

RRA 241 Recreation Resource 

Relationships 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Resources. 3 

ZO 353 Wildlife Management 3 

Conservation Electives 12 



81 



Electives : 



BAE 472 Agricultural Water 

Management 4 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 4 

BO 544 Plant Geography 3 

FOR 452 Silvics 4 

FOR 572 Conservation Policy Issues 3 

GY 208 Environmental Physical Geography . 3 

GY 222 Historical Geology 3 

MY 201 Atmospheric Environment 3 

MY 486 Weather and Climate 2 

RRA 441 Recreation Resource 

Development 3 

RRA 442 Wildland Recreation 

Environments 3 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

Soil and Water Conservation 3 

Forest Soils 3 

Ornithology 3 

Fishery Science 3 

Mammalogy 3 



SSC 461 
SSC 472 
ZO 501 
ZO 420 
ZO 544 



Biological Science Requirements: 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

or 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology . 4 

Electives* 9 

21 

English, Humanity and Social Science 
Requirements 

ENG 111, ENG 112 Composition and 

Rhetoric, Reading 6 

English Electives 6 

Humanity — Social Science Electives 21 



Mathematics and Physical Sciences 
CH 101, CH 103 General Chemistry I, II . . 8 
MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 

and either 
MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 

or 
MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I . 8 
PY 221 College Physics 5 

or 

PY 211, PY 212 General Physics 8 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

24-27 

Orientation 1 

Physical Education 4 

Electives 15 

20 
Total Hours for Graduation 128 



* These biological science electives would vary to meet requirements of different departments; they 
would include such courses as botany, entomology, genetics, physiology, plant pathology and 
zoology. 



83 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN CONSERVATION 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

For the freshman year see pages 65-66. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

Humanities— Social Sciences Elective 3 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Resources . 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester 
BO 200 Plant Life 



Credits 



ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

English Elective 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences Elective 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Physical Education 1 



L6 



Fall Semester 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology . 4 

Conservation Elective 4 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource 

Management 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences Elective 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 

Biological Sciences 



Credits 

Elective 3 

Conservation Elective 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences Elective 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

RRA 241 Recreation Resource 

Relationships 3 



17 



17 



Fall Semester 



Biological Sciences Elective 3 

Conservation Elective 3 

English Elective 3 

ZO 353 Wildlife Management 3 

Free Electives 5 



17 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
Biological Sciences Elective 3 



Conservation Elective 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 

15 
Total Hours for Graduation 128 



CURRICULUM IN CONSERVATION (Wildlife Concentration) 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 



For the freshman year pages 65-66. 



Fall Semester 



English or Language Elective 

(Literature) 3 

GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

Free Elective 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

Physical Education 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

English or Language Elective 3 

Social Science — Humanity Electives 6 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural 

Resources 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



17 



Fall Semester 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

RRA 241 Recreation Resource 

Relationships 3 

ZO 360 (BO 360) Introduction to Ecology . . 4 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Social Science or Humanity 6 

ZO 351 Vertebrate Zoology 4 

Advised Elective 4 



17 



16 



84 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ZO 353 Wildlife Management 3 FOR 472 Renewable Resources 

ZO 420 Fishery Science 3 Management 3 

ZO 501 Ornithology 3 GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

Free Electives 6 ZO 544 Mammalogy 3 

— Free Electives 6 

15 — 

15 
Total Hours for Graduation 128 

For the student who is interested in conservation and communication, the 
following courses in communication are available: 

AC 311 Communications Methods and 

Media 3 

ENG 215 Principles of News and 

Article Writing 3 

ENG 321 The Communication of Technical 
Information 3 

ENG 496 Literary Analysis (Senior 

Seminar) 3 

SP 350 Fundamentals of Radio Broad- 
casting 3 



CROP SCIENCE 

Williams Hall 

Professor P. H. Harvey, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: C. A. Brim (USDA), D. S. Chamblee, J. F. Chaplin (USDA), W. K. 
Collins, W. A. Cope (USDA), D. A. Emery, D. U. Gerstel, W. C. Gregory, 
H. D. Gross, G. L. Jones, K. R. Keller, J. A. Lee (USDA), W. M. Lewis, 
T. J. Mann, P. A. Miller, R. P. Moore, D. E. Moreland (USDA), L. L. 
Phillips, J. C. Rice, D. L. Thompson (USDA), D. H. Timothy, J. B. Weber, 
E. A. Wernsman, J. A. Weybrew, A. D. Worsham: Adjunct Professor: W. H. 
Wessling; Professor Emeritus: G. K. Middleton; Associate Professors: J. C. 
Burns (USDA), T. H. Busbice (USDA), F. T. Corbin, W. T. Fike Jr., W. B. 
Gilbert, G. R. Gwynn (USDA), C. F. Murphy; Assistant Professors: R. C. 
Long, R. P. Patterson, J. W. Schrader, C. F. Tester (USDA), W. W. Weeks; 
Instructors: D. T. Gooden III, T. H. Nunalee III, J. C. Wynne; Associate 
Members of the Faculty: E. C. Sisler (Biochemistry), T. J. Sheets (Entomology, 
Horticultural Science) 

EXTENSION 

Professor G. L. Jones, In Charge of Agronomy Extension 

Professors: C. T. Blake, S. H. Dobson, S. N. Hawks Jr., F. W. McLaughlin, 
A. Perry, A. D. Stuart; Professors Emeriti: R. R. Bennett, Associate Pro- 
fessors: H. F. Ross, W. G. Toomey; Assistant Professors: J. G. Clapp Jr, H. D. 
Coble, E. L. Kimbrough; Assistant Professor Emeritus: R. H. Crouse; 
Agronomy Specialist: G. A. Sullivan 

The rapid increase in human populations, the continuing evolution of pests and 
diseases, the challenge of new natural and artificial environments and the decrease 
of farm land are all critical and current world issues. 

The curricula in this department are designed to give the crop science major an 
awareness and a sense of personal involvement in these issues. The student 

85 



receives a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of plant science 
which tend to shape modern crop production practices. He is also trained in the 
economics of various crop management procedures which may influence long- 
range investments. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

With cash crops returning nearly one billion dollars to the annual farm income 
of North Carolina, the opportunities within the state for crop science graduates in 
county extension programs, in farm management, as salesmen of seed and 
agricultural chemicals and in the several governmental agencies remain good. 
Demand for qualified students in national and international concerns is increasing. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in crop science is offered under 
the business and science curricula of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 
Students may also earn the degree of Bachelor of Science under the technology 
curriculum with a major in agronomy. The agronomy option is administered 
jointly by the Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 

CURRICULA IN CROP SCIENCE 

BUSINESS PROGRAM 
Refer to pages 66-67. 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

Credits 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A. 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Group A, B, & C Courses 
(24 Credits) 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 
MA 114 Topics in Modern Math 

or 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B. 3 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 

Electives in A, B, or C Courses 2 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(27 Credits) 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 

CS 311 Field Crop Production 
or 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

CS 414 Weed Science 3 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science ... 1 
ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Soil Science Electives 3 

Elective 1 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



CURRICULUM IN AGRONOMY* 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

Credits 
BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

Groups A, B & C Courses 
(19-20 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry . . 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 

Electives 9 or 10 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(28 Credits) 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 

CS 311 Field Crop Production 
or 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop 

Production 2 



86 



CS 413 Plant Breeding 2 SSC 452 Soil Classification 3 

CS 414 Weed Science 3 SSC 461 Soil and Water Conservation 3 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science ... 1 Electives 3 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 Total Hours for Graduation 130 



* The agronomy major is administered by the Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science and is 
listed jointly. See typical agronomy curriculum under soil science, pages 109-110. 



PLANT PROTECTION 

The Departments of Crop Science, Entomology and Plant Pathology offer a joint 
undergraduate major in plant protection. See the section on plant protection, pages 
101-102, for details. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Crop Science offers a professional master's program, the 
Master of Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy. Prospective applicants should 
consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



DAIRY SCIENCE 

(See animal science, pages 70-73.) 

ECONOMICS 

(Also see liberal arts.) 
Patterson Hall 
Professor W. D. Toussaint, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: A. J. Bartley, A. J. Coutu, D. M. Hoover, L. A. Ihnen, G. D. Irwin 
(USDA), H. B. James, P. R. Johnson, R. A. King, G. A. Mathia, B. M. Olsen, 
J. A. Seagraves, R. L. Simmons, J. G. Sutherland (USDA), C. B. Turner, 
T. D. Wallace, J. C. Williamson Jr.; Adjunct Professor: D. R. Dixon; 
Professor Emeriti: J. G. Maddox, E. W. Swanson, T. W. Wood; Associate 
Professors: D. S. Ball, J. S. Chappell, M. M. El-Kammash, E. W. Erickson, 
R. M. Fearn, B. L. Gardner, C. W. Harrell Jr., E. W. Jones, F. A. Mangum, 
E. C. Pasour Jr., R. J. Peeler Jr., R. K. Perrin, R. A. Schrimper, R. E. Sylla, 
J. W. Wilson; Assistant Professors: J. B. Bullock, G. A. Carlson, W. D. 
Cooper, L. E. Danielson, L. M. Ennis Jr., A. R. Gallant, H. C. Gilliam Jr., 
(USDA), T. J. Grennes, D. L. Holley, D. N. Hyman, C. P. Jones, J. C. 
Matthews Jr., R. B. McBurney Jr., M. B. McElroy, L. B. Perkinson (USDA); 
W. P. Pinna, J. C. Poindexter, R. C. Reinoso, H. A. Sandman, C. R. Shumway; 
Assistant Professor Emeritus: O. G. Thompson; Instructors: J. D. Acker, 
C. H. Baker, A. M. Beals Jr., F. V. Harrell Jr., Judith M. Jefferys, J. S. 
Lapp, J. H. Reeder, D. H. Stuart 

EXTENSION 

Professor F. D. Sobering, In Charge, Extension Economics 

Professors: R. C. Brooks, G. L. Capel, D. G. Harwood, T. E. Nichols, E. A. Proc- 
tor, C. R. Pugh, W. L. Turner, C. R. Weathers; Associate Professors: J. G. 
Allgood, R. S. Boal, R. D. Dahle, L. H. Hammond, H. A. Homme, H. L. 



87 



Liner, D. F. Neuman, P. S. Stone, R. C. Wells; Assistant Professors: J. E. 
Ikerd, E. M. Stallings, Ruby P. Uzzle; Instructor: D. C. Pardue 

Agricultural economics is one of several fields of specialization offered by the 
Department of Economics. The department is administered jointly by the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences and the School of Liberal Arts. For information on 
fields of economics other than agricultural see pages 197-200 under the School of 
Liberal Arts. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is offered for undergraduates. Students are 
given training in all aspects of organizing and operating agricultural business 
firms. A sound foundation in basic economic principles of production and marketing 
is provided in order that graduates will be able to deal with the problems associated 
with rapid changes in technical and economic conditions. 

The general objectives of the department, in the area of agricultural economics, 
are as follows: (1) To train students in the fundamentals of business organization 
and to make sound decisions in organizing and managing farms and other agricultural 
businesses; (2) To instruct students in economic theory which may be used as a 
basis for understanding the relationship of agriculture to other parts of the economy 
and for the evaluation of agricultural policy and economic changes which affect 
agriculture; (3) To train graduate students in advanced economic theory and 
research techniques. 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Training in agricultural economics qualifies a student for a wide range of 
opportunities. The growing number of companies processing and manufacturing 
agricultural products has created an increasing demand for people trained in 
agricultural economics. Opportunities include employment by companies handling 
farm supplies, such as feed, fertilizer and equipment; general marketing and 
processing firms; agricultural cooperatives; professional farm management 
agencies, and various credit agencies. 

Many graduates of the department are employed in research and educational 
work by various agencies of the Federal and state governments. These include the 
Agricultural Extension Service, the Agricultural Experiment Station, the State 
Department of Agriculture and other agencies of the United States Department 
of Agriculture. 

Greater emphasis on an agribusiness management option and accounting will 
further stimulate demand for graduates. As industrial and agricultural development 
continues in North Carolina and other areas, employment opportunities are 
expected to increase. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

Two options are available to undergraduate students majoring in agricultural 
economics. These curricula options are business and science. Students must meet 
all of the basic requirements of the University and the School of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences. 

Agricultural science majors are required to meet the science requirements pre- 
sented on page 66. The student takes MA 212 to provide a stronger base for 
the quantitative areas of economics and techniques used in economic analysis. He is 
also required to strengthen his abilities in general areas of economics and business 
by fulfilling the departmental and Group B requirements and restricted electives 
of the business curriculum (except for courses in personnel and business manage- 
ment). 

In the business program in economics, students receive strong training in 
economics and business to develop the ability to identify, understand and solve 
economic problems. The requirements of this program are outlined below. 



88 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



BUSINESS PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Orientation 1 

Languages 

(12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Elective (English or Modern Language) 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(2U-25 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Biological Science Elective 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A. 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(26 Credits) 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 

EC 302 National Income and Economic 

Welfare 3 

EC 317 Introduction to Methods of 

Economic Analysis 3 

or 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

EC 413 Competition, Monopoly, and 

Public Policy 3 

or 

EC 533 Agricultural Policy 3 

Electives in Support of Major 14 



Electives and Restricted Electives 

From Groups A, B, and C* 

(29 or SO Credits) 

Electives from Groups A and C 5 or 6 

Group B — Requirements, Restricted 

Electives, and Electives 24 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

Financial Reporting 3 

Business Electives — Group B 6 

Business Management: 

EC 310 Economics of the Firm 3 

or 
EC 525 Management Policy and 
Decision Making 
Finance: 

EC 402 Financial Institutions 3 

or 
EC 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance 

or 
EC 420 Corporation Finance 
Marketing: 

EC 311 Agricultural Markets 3 

or 
EC 411 Marketing Methods 

or 
EC 521 Markets and Trade 
Personnel : 

EC 426 Personnel Management 3 

or 
EC 431 Labor Economics 

or 
EC 432 Industrial Relations 
Production: 

EC 303 Farm Management 3 

or 
EC 425 Industrial Management 

or 
EC 551 Agricultural Production 
Economics 



Other Electives 
(12 Credits) 

Free Electives 12 

Subtotal 126 

Physical Education 4 

Total Hours for Graduation 130** 



* Group A includes the physical and biological sciences; Group B, economics and business manage- 
ment; Group C, applied science and technology; Group D, social sciences and humanities. 
** This curriculum (and the science curriculum) requires the completion of one course in literature. 



A typical business program in economics follows. However, it should be empha- 
sized that there is a great deal of flexibility in the agricultural economics major. 
Approximately 25 percent of the student's total course work is selected by the 
student in consultation with his major adviser. This flexibility permits each 
student to develop a strong background in business and economics and at the same 
time concentrate in a supporting area of major interest such as conservation, 
crops and soils, economic development, livestock and poultry, or processing of 
agricultural products. It also facilitates the fulfilling of the requirements for a 
major in other departments at the same time the degree in agricultural economics 
is being earned. 

For the freshman year see pages 65-66. 



89 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



BUSINESS PROGRAM 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits 

ANS 204 Livestock Feeds and Feeding .... 3 

CS 211 Crop Science 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 3 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Physical Education 2 



34 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 

EC 302 National Income and Economic 

Welfare 3 

EC 303 Farm Management 3 

EC 311 Agricultural Markets 3 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

Financial Reporting 3 

EC 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance 3 

EC 431 Labor Economics 3 

ENG 265 American Literature I 

(Beginnings to 1850) 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

Free Elective 3 



34 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits 

EC 407 Business Law I 3 

EC 430 Agricultural Price Analysis 3 

EC 440 Economic Development 3 

EC 523 Planning Farm and Area 

Adjustments 3 

EC 525 Management Policy and 

Decision Making 3 

EC 533 Agricultural Policy 3 

EC 551 Agricultural Production Economics. 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Free Electives 7 

31 
Total Hours for Graduation 130 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The Master of Economics, Master of Arts in economics and Master of Science 
in agricultural economics degrees are available as well as the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree with a specialization in agricultural economics. Prospective applicants 
should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



ENTOMOLOGY 

Gardner Hall 

Professor Kenneth L. Knight, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: R. C. Axtell, C. H. Brett, W. V. Campbell, W. C. Dauterman, M. H. 
Farrier, F. E. Guthrie, Ernest Hodgson, W. J. Mistric Jr., H. H. Neunzig, 
R. L. Rabb, T. J. Sheets, C. F. Smith, D. A. Young Jr; Adjunct Professors: 
Lawrence Fishbein, J. R. Fouts, Louise M. Russell, C. W. Sabrosky, R. I. 
Sailer; Professor Emeritus: T. B. Mitchell; Associate Professors: J. R. 
Bradley, W. M. Brooks, H. B. Moore Jr., G. C. Rock, C. G. Wright, R. T. 
Yamamoto; Adjunct Associate Professor: A. L. Chasson 



90 



EXTENSION 

Professor: G. T. Weekman, Specialist in Charge 

Professor: R. L. Robertson; Professor- Emeritus: G. D. Jones; Associate Pro- 
fessors: J. M. Falter, H. E. Scott, F. E. Whitfield; Assistant Professors: J. R. 
Baker, K. A. Sorensen 

The entomology curriculum offers broad training at both the undergraduate and 
graduate levels in basic biology and related sciences, particularly as they relate 
to the study of insects. In addition, introductory and terminal courses in insect 
control technology are offered at the undergraduate level for students majoring 
in other areas. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities for careers in entomology are plentiful and varied. Research posi- 
tions are available in many universities and colleges as well as with federal and 
state government and private industry. The needs for college teachers are also 
great. Other opportunities include development, production, control and sales 
positions in the pesticide field and regulatory and extension positions with state 
and federal agencies. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in entomology is offered under 
the science curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Students are 
also encouraged to major in biological sciences and devote their electives to 
entomology courses. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 65-70. 



CURRICULUM IN ENTOMOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Group A Courses 
(25-26 Credits) 
BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry or 

equivalent 3 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 
or 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

or 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Electives* 5 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(26 Credits) 

ENT 301 Introduction to Forest Insects 

or 
ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

ENT 401 (ZO 401) Bibliographic 

Research in Biology 1 

ENT 502 Insect Diversity 4 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects ... 4 
Advised Electives 14 



* May be taken from Groups B and C. 



91 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN ENTOMOLOGY 

For the freshman year, see pages 65-66. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

or 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Physical Education 1 

Advised Elective 3 

17-18 



Second Semester Credits 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

English or Modern Language Elective 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



First Semester 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Second Semester 



PY 221 College Physics 5 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry . . 4 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 



15 



Credits 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



First Semester 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Second Semester 



15 



Credits 



ENT 502 Insect Diversity 4 

ENT 401 Bibliographic Research in 

Biology 1 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Advised Electives 7 



18 



ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects ... 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Free Elective 3 

Advised Electives 6 



Total Hours for Graduation 



17 
130 



PLANT PROTECTION 

The Departments of Crop Science, Entomology and Plant Pathology offer a 
joint major in plant protection. See section on plant protection, pages 101-102 for 
details. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees and a professional 
master's program are offered in entomology. Prospective applicants should consult 
the Graduate School Catalog. 



FOOD SCIENCE 

Schaub Food Science Building 

Professor W. M. Roberts, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: L. W. Aurand, T. A. Bell (USDA), T. N. Blumer, H. B. Craig, J. L. 
Etchells (USDA), M. W. Hoover, A. E. Purcell (USDA), M. L. Speck, H. E. 



92 



Swaisgood, F. G. Warren; Professor Emeritus: I. D. Jones; Associate Pro- 
fessors: D. E. Carroll Jr., H. P. Fleming (USDA), S. E. Gilliland, D. D. 
Hamann, V. A. Jones, W. M. Walter Jr. (USDA), N. B. Webb; Assistant 
Professors: D. M. Adams Jr., H. R. Ball Jr., G. G. Giddings, A. P. Hansen, 
B. R. Johnson; Adjunct Assistant Professor: W. Y. Cobb 

EXTENSION 

Professors: J. A. Christian, Eloise Cofer, M. E. Gregory, F. B. Thomas, Associate 
Professors: N. C. Miller Jr., F. R. Tarver Jr.; Assistant Professor: Mary K. 
Head; Specialist: R. E. Carawan, T. M. Miller 

The Department of Food Science provides undergraduate and graduate programs 
for the application and coordination of the physical and biological sciences, econom- 
ics and engineering to the development, processing, packaging, quality control, 
distribution and utilization of foods. 

The department maintains modern and fully equipped laboratories for teaching 
and research programs in food microbiology and fermentation, food chemistry, 
food engineering and dairy, fruit, meat, poultry, seafood and vegetable products. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The increasing consumer demands for greater varieties and quantities of highly 
nutritious and convenience foods of uniformly high quality create many and 
varied career opportunities in the food and allied industries for qualified personnel. 

Specific career opportunities in the food industries are: management, research 
and development, process supervision, quality control, procurement, distribution, 
sales and merchandising. Career opportunities include sales and services in allied 
industries, consulting and trade association activities and promotional and educa- 
tional services. 

Food science graduates hold teaching, research and extension positions with 
colleges and universities. Many governmental agencies employ food scientists 
whose work is directed toward research, regulatory control and the development 
of food standards. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in food science is offered under the 
science or technology curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

CURRICULA IN FOOD SCIENCE 

SCIENCE OR TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(26 Credits) 

FS 201 Food Science and Technology 3 

FS 331 (BAE 331) Food Engineering 3 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 3 

FS 405 (MB 405) Food Microbiology 3 

Departmental Electives 14 



93 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Orientation 1 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

Social Science and Humanities Elective .... 3 

Physical Education 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



16 



Fall Semester 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus B 3 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

FS 201 Food Science and Technology 3 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 



PY 212 General Physics 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Literature Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Fall Semester 



FS 331 (BAE 331) Food Engineering 3 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 3 

FS 405 (MB 405) Food Microbiology 3 

Language Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Food Science Elective 3 

Group A Electives 6 

Social Science and Humanities Electives .... 6 

Free Elective 3 



18 



15 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Food Science Electives 6 Food Science Electives 5 

Group A Elective 2 Group A 



Social Science and Humanities Electives .... 6 
Free Elective 3 



Electives 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Total Hours for Graduation 



14 
.130 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Orientation 1 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 



Credits 



Calculus A 4 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 
or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



94 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics .... 3 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I or 

or CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry ... 4 PY 221 College Physics 5 

FS 201 Food Science and Technology 3 MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Social Science and Humanities Electives .... 6 Literature Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 



Fall Semester 

FS 331 (BAE 331) Food Engineering 3 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 3 

FS 405 (MB 405) Food Microbiology 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective .... 3 

Free Elective 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Food Science Elective 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective .... 3 

Group A, B, or C Electives 6 

Free Elective 3 



15 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 
Food Science Electives 6 Food Science Electives 6 



Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Group A, B, or C Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



Social Science and Humanities Elective .... 3 

Group A, B, or C Electives 4 

Free Elective 3 

16 
Total Hours for Graduation 130 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Food Science offers the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees and a professional master's program. Prospective applicants 
should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



GENETICS 

Gardner Hall 

Professor T. J. Mann, Head of the Department 

Professors: C. H. Bostian, D. S. Grosch, W. D. Hanson, C. S. Levings III, D. F. 
Matzinger, L. E. Mettler, R. H. Moll, T. Mukai, G. Namkoong (USFS), 
L. C. Saylor, B. W. Smith, S. G. Stephens, A. C. Triantaphyllou; Associate 
Professors: L. G. Burk (USDA), W. E. Kloos, H. E. Schaffer, C. W. Stuber 
(USDA); Assistant Professor: F. M. Johnson; Instructor: W. H. McKenzie; 
Associate Geneticist: M. P. Gregory; Associate Members of the Faculty: 

E. U. Dillard, E. J. Eisen, J. E. Legates, O. W. Robison (Animal Science); 

F. B. Armstrong (Biochemistry and Microbiology); C. A. Brim, J. F. Chaplin 
(USDA), W. A. Cope (USDA), D. A. Emery, D. U. Gerstel, W. C. Gregory, 

G. R. Gwynn (USDA), P. H. Harvey, J. A. Lee, P. A. Miller, C. F. Murphy, 
L. L. Phillips, C. F. Tester (USDA), D. L. Thompson (USDA), D. H. Timo- 
thy, E. A. Wernsman (Crop Science); C. C. Cockerham, M. M. Goodman, J. O. 
Rawlings (Statistics); J. W. Duffield, T. O. Perry, B. J. Zobel (Forestry); 
F. D. Cochran, G. J. Galletta, F. L. Haynes Jr., (Horticultural Science); 
J. L. Apple, T. T. Hebert, N. T. Powell (Plant Pathology); W. L. Blow, E. W. 
Glazener, G. A. Martin (Poultry Science) 



95 



The genetics faculty offers instruction at advanced undergraduate and graduate 
levels. The undergraduate courses are designed to support other departments 
of the institution, giving students a background in the science of genetics. The 
graduate program is designed to train scientists for research and teaching careers 
in basic genetics and in its application in plant and animal breeding. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

There is no program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. Undergraduates 
are encouraged to pursue a program in the biological sciences. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Genetics offers the Master of Science and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees and a professional master's program. Prospective applicants 
should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

Kilgore Hall 

Professor C. W. Donoho Jr., Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: W. E. Ballinger, F. D. Cochran, G. J. Galletta, F. L. Haynes 
Jr., L. J. Kushman (USDA), R. A. Larson, C. H. Miller, D. T. Pope, R. L. 
Sawyer (Peru); Professors Emeriti: M. E. Gardner, J. M. Jenkins Jr., 
G. O. Randall; Associate Professors: T. F. Cannon, F. E. Correll, 
R. G. Halfacre, W. R. Henderson, T. R. Konsler, R. L. Lower, P. V. 
Nelson, W. B. Nesbitt, D. C. Zeiger; Assistant Professors: L. K. Hammett, 
T. J. Monaco, D. M. Pharr, C. R. Unrath; Instructors: R. M. Southall, 
V. H. Underwood; Associate Members of the Faculty: R. J. Downs (Botany); 
R. H. Moll (Genetics); T. J. Sheets (Entomology, Crop Science); R. Aycock 
(Plant Pathology); R. J. Volk (Soils) 

EXTENSION 

Professor A. A. Banadyga In Charge 

Professors: H. M. Covington, M. H. Kolbe, J. W. Love; Professor Emeritus: 
J. H. Harris; Associate Professors: J. F. Brooks, C. M. Mainland, W. A. 
Skroch, H. J. Smith; Assistant Professors: G. R. Hughes, W. W. Reid, D. C. 
Sanders, R. L. Spangler 

The undergraduate programs in horticultural science offer broad train- 
ing in the physical and biological sciences and business as well as a sound 
cultural background. Students are prepared for graduate study or for diverse 
professional service in the fruit and vegetable crops field, in floriculture and in 
nursery management and landscape horticulture. 

The varied climatic conditions in North Carolina make possible the production 
of a wide variety of horticultural crops on a commercial scale, as well as in parks 
and gardens. While these crops now represent an important segment of agriculture 
in North Carolina, further expansion will be realized with the development of 
adapted varieties, mechanization and intensification of cultural practices, improve- 
ment of handling and marketing methods and the development of the food process- 
ing industry. 



96 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates in horticulture will find opportunities in a wide variety of positions 
in production, processing, sales and service. Among these are county extension 
agents; vocational agricultural teachers; landscaping and landscape contracting; 
farm operators; orchard, nursery, greenhouse and flower shop managers; research, 
production and promotional specialists with commercial seed, floral, fertilizer, 
chemical and food companies; inspectors and quality control technologists; USDA 
specialists and as leaders in other phases of agricultural and industrial develop- 
ments. In addition, the student may prepare himself for one of the many oppor- 
tunities for graduate study. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in horticultural science can be 
earned in one of the three curricula — business, science, or technology — offered 
by the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Under these curricula, specialized 
training is offered for horticultural science majors in fruit and vegetable crops, and 
in floriculture, nursery management and landscape horticulture. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 65-70. 

For the business curriculum see pages 66-67. 



TYPICAL CURRICULA IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits- 
FV* OH* 



BO 200 Plant Life 4 4 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 4 4 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry 4 4 4 

HS 211, HS 212 Ornamental Plants 6 6 

HS 301 Plant Propagation 3 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 5 5 

Social Science and Humanities Electives 9 

SSC 200 Soils 4 4 4 

Elective 3 3 3 

Physical Education 2 2 2 

35 35 35 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits 

FV* OH* F* 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 4 4 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Insects 3 3 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 3 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory 1 1 1 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 4 4 

Modern Language or English Elective 6 6 6 

PP 3 15 Plant Diseases 3 3 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 3 

Free Electives 6 6 6 

33 33 33 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits 

FV* OH* F* 

HS 411 Nursery Management 3 

HS 421 Fruit Production 3 

HS 432 Vegetable Production 3 

HS 441, HS 442 Floriculture I, II 6 

HS 471 Arboriculture 3 

HS 491 Senior Seminar in Horticultural Science 1 1 1 

HS 562 (FS 562) Post-Harvest Physiology 3 

Social Science and Humanities Electives 3 15 15 

Advised Electives 15 6 6 

Free Electives 3 3 3 

31 31 31 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



* FV — Fruits and Vegetables 
OH — Ornamental and Landscape Horticulture 
F — Floriculture 



TYPICAL CURRICULA IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

FV* 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

HS 211, 212 Ornamental Plants 

HS 301 Plant Propagation 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Social Science and Humanities Electives 6 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Physical Education 2 

34 
JUNIOR YEAR 

FV* 

BO 42 1 Plant Physiology 4 

EC 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Insects 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory 1 

HS 414 Residential Landscaping 

Modern Language or English Elective 3 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

Free Elective 6 



Credits 
OH* 

4 
4 
3 
6 
3 
5 
3 

4 
2 



Credits 
OH* 

4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
4 

3 
3 
3 
6 



F* 

4 

4 

3 

6 

3 

5 

3 

4 
2 

34 



F* 

4 

3 

3 

3 

1 

3 
3 
3 
3 
6 



32 33 32 

SENIOR YEAR 

Credits 

FV* OH* F* 

HS 411 Nursery Management 3 

HS 421 Fruit Production 3 

HS 432 Vegetable Production 3 

HS 441, 442 Floriculture I, II 6 

HS 47 1 Arboriculture 3 

HS 491 Senior Seminar in Horticultural Science 1 1 1 

HS 562 (FS 562) Post-Harvest Physiology 3 

Modern Language or English Elective 3 

Social Science and Humanities Electives 6 6 

Departmental Elective 14 ° " 

Technical Elective 3 3 3 

Free Elective 6 6 6 

33 33 33 
Total Hours for Graduation 130 



FV — Fruits and Vegetables 

OH — Ornamental and Landscape Horticulture 

F — Floriculture 



98 



GRADUATE STUDY 

Graduate study under the direction of the horticultural science faculty may 
enable the student to qualify for the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. Areas of study and research include plant physiology, plant breeding and 
genetics, post-harvest physiology, plant nutrition, growth regulators and weed 
science involving all horticultural crops. The professional degrees can be earned by 
students who do not plan further graduate study and want to substitute additional 
course work for the research requirement in their graduate program. Cooperative 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs can be arranged with 
the Departments of Botany, Food Science, Genetics and Soil Science. Prospective 
students should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Gardner Hall 

G. C. Miller, Major Adviser 

North Carolina State University has two parallel programs in medical tech- 
nology. The first program consists of a four-year curriculum with a Bachelor of 
Science in Zoology followed by a year of training in a hospital laboratory school. 

The second program is designed to be completed in four calendar years. The stu- 
dent takes a prescribed curriculum for three years at North Carolina State Univer- 
sity. The fourth year consists of a 12-month course in medical technology at the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill or other approved institutions. At the 
completion of this phase, a Bachelor of Science degree will be granted from North 
Carolina State University and a certificate in medical technology from the ap- 
proved institution. (See zoology pages 110-114.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Gardner Hall 

Professor J. B. Evans, Head of the Department 

Professors: W. J. Dobrogosz, G. H. Elkan, P. B. Hamilton, J. J. Perry; Adjunct 
Associate Professors: H. L. Lewis, J. J. Tulis; Assistant Professor: E. C. 
Hayes III: Associate Members of the Faculty: J. G. Lecce. J. J. McNeill 
(Animal Science); F. B. Armstrong (Biochemistry and Genetics); J. L. 
Etchells, M. L. Speck (Food Science); W. E. Kloos (Genetics); W. V. Bartho- 
lomew (Soil Science) 

The program in microbiology is designed to provide basic preparation for pro- 
fessional microbiologists, a background in microbiology for students in the other 
biological sciences, and an awareness of the microbial world as it relates to our daily 
lives for students in the liberal arts and other areas outside the biological 
sciences. 

Microbiology is concerned with the growth and development, physiology, classi- 
fication, ecology, genetics and other aspects of the life processes of an array of 
tiny, generally single-celled, organisms. These organisms may serve as model 
systems for elucidation of fundamental processes that are common to all living 
cells. Most of the major discoveries that have produced the spectacular advances 
in biology during the past decade have resulted from studies of microbial systems. 
Future developments in the realm of environmental quality and pollution control 
will rely heavily on an understanding of microbial processes of biodegradation and 
assimilation. 



99 



OPPORTUNITIES 

There are numerous career opportunities for microbiologists in research labora- 
tories, diagnostic and control laboratories, teaching, and technical sales and service 
positions. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

Although sufficient courses are offered to provide an undergraduate major, 
students with a primary interest in microbiology are advised to take the bio- 
logical sciences curriculum (see pages 78-81) and to devote their electives to bio- 
chemistry, chemistry, mathematics and microbiology. Generally as few as 12 
credits in microbiology may be recommended. However, if a student does not plan 
to go beyond the Bachelor of Science level, and desires to qualify for registration or 
a civil service position as a microbiologist, 20 credits in microbiology should be 
taken. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers programs leading to both the Master of Science and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in microbiology as well as a professional master's 
program. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Gardner Hall 

Professor D. E. Ellis, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: J. L. Apple, R. Aycock, K. R. Barker, C. N. Clayton, E. B. Cowling, 
E. Echandi, T. T. Hebert, C. S. Hodges Jr. (USDA), D. M. Kline (USDA), 
G. B. Lucas, L. W. Nielsen, C. J. Nusbaum, N. T. Powell, J. P. Ross, (USDA), 
J. N. Sasser, D. L. Strider, Hedwig H. Triantaphyllou, N. N. Winstead; 
Professor Emeriti: S. G. Lehman, F. L. Wellman; Adjunct Professor: 
G. H. Hepting; Associate Professors: G. V. Gooding Jr., L. F. Grand, D. 
Huisingh, S. F. Jenkins Jr., M. P. Levi, R. D. Milholland, H. W. 
Spurr Jr., (USDA); Adjunct Associate Professors: E. R. French, J. W. 
Koenigs, E. G. Kuhlman, R. A. Reinert; Assistant Professors: M. K. 
Beute, K. J. Leonard (USDA), L. T. Lucas, C. E. Main, R. E. Welty 
(USDA), C. G. Van Dyke; Adjunct Assistant Professors: A. S. Heagle, N. A. 
Lapp, R. W. Pero, R. G. Wilhour 



EXTENSION 

Associate Professor H. E. Duncan, In Charge 

Professors: F. A. Todd, J. C. Wells; Professor Emeritus: H. R. Garriss; Associate 
Professor: C. W. Averre III; Assistant Professors: R. K. Jones, P. B. 
Shoemaker, J. H. Wilson Jr.; Extension Insti-uctor: C. K. Batten 

Undergraduate instruction in plant pathology is designed to provide introductory 
and advanced courses on the nature and control of plant diseases to students 
majoring in crop science, horticultural science, plant protection, agricultural 
education and forestry. It can also provide students with the fundamental training 
necessary for graduate study in plant pathology. 



100 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Many opportunities for employment in research, extension and teaching are 
available to graduates with advanced degrees in the field of plant pathology. Open- 
ings are available for qualified persons in research in the USDA, state experiment 
stations and in industry. The rapid development of agricultural chemicals and 
other methods for disease control offers numerous opportunities. (See plant protec- 
tion curriculum.) 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The Department of Plant Pathology cooperates in the training of plant protec- 
tion majors, but does not offer a major in plant pathology at the undergraduate 
level. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Plant Pathology offers graduate training in all phases of 
plant pathology leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Phil- 
osophy as well as a professional master's program. 



PLANT PROTECTION 

Williams and Gardner Halls 

N. T. Powell, Major Adviser, Department of Plant Pathology 
D. A. Emery, Major Adviser, Department of Crop Science 
F. E. Guthrie, Major Adviser, Department of Entomology 

Plant protection is a joint major in the Departments of Entomology, Crop 
Science and Plant Pathology. 

Students in plant protection will be trained in the application of chemical and 
biological principles for the control of plant diseases, insects and weeds. Crop 
losses from insects, weeds and diseases for the past several years have been esti- 
mated in excess of 10 billion dollars annually in the United States. A knowledge of 
the organisms to be controlled, the products to be used and the crops to be grown 
is basic to any control or regulatory program. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities in plant protection basically involve improving farm efficiency 
to meet our ever-growing need for food and fiber. About 340 chemical companies 
are concerned with manufacturing and formulating products for pest control. Tech- 
nically trained persons are needed for sales development and promotion of agricul- 
tural chemicals. Graduates are also trained to fill positions as county extension 
agents or as state and federal regulatory agents. This major is primarily intended 
for the Bachelor of Science degree. However, qualified students can go on to grad- 
uate school from this curriculum. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in plant protection is offered 
under the agricultural science curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements seepages 65-70. 



101 



CURRICULUM IN PLANT PROTECTION 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Restricted Electives from Group A 
(26 Credits) 

Credits 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

CH 220 and BCH 351 Introductory 

Organic Chemistry, Elementary 

Biochemistry 7 

or 
CH 221 and CH 223 Organic Chemistry I, 

Organic Chemistry II 8 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Electives from Group A, B or C 3 or 4 



Major Requirements 
(25 Credits) 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 

CS 414 Weed Science 3 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control . . 3 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 

PP 500 Plant Disease Control 3 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

Advised Electives 4 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN PLANT PROTECTION 

For the freshman year see pages 65-66. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



BO 200 
CH 101 



Plant Life 4 

General Chemistry I 4 



CH 105 Chemistry — Principles and 

Applications 3 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 

Modern Language or English Elective 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

18-19 



Second Semester 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 



Credits 



CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic 

Insects 3 

Modern Languages or English Elective 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Physical Education 1 



16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry 



CH 221 
PP 315 
SSC 200 



Organic Chemistry I 4 

Plant Diseases 3 

Soils 4 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Electives 3 



17 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



BO 421 
BCH 351 



Plant Physiology 4 

Elementary Biochemistry 3 



CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . . 1 
Social Science and Humanities Elective .... 3 
Electives 3 

17 or 18 



Fall Semester 



CS 414 Weed Science 3 

ENT 551 Fundamentals of Insect Control .. 3 
Phys., Bio. or Business or Tech. 

Elective 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
MB 401 General Microbiology 4 



PP 500 Plant Disease Control 3 

Physical or Biological Elective 2 or 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 or 16 
Total Hours for Graduation 130 



102 



POULTRY SCIENCE 

Scott Hall 

Professor R. E. Cook, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: H. L. Bumgardner, W. E. Donaldson, E. W. Glazener, P. B. Hamilton, 

C. H. Hill; Professor Emeritus: C. W. Barber; Associate Professors: 
W. L. Blow, W. M. Colwell, J. B. Ward; Adjunct Associate Professor: 
T. B. Dameron Jr.; Associate Professor Emeritus: F. W. Cook; Assistant 
Professors: D. M. Briggs, J. D. Garlich, C. R. Parkhurst, W. R. Prince, 

D. G. Simmons, J. P. Thaxton 



EXTENSION 

Professor W. C. Mills Jr., In Charge 

Professors: W. G. Andrews, J. R. Harris; Professor Emeritus: C. F. Parrish; 
Associate Professors: G. A. Martin, T. B. Morris; Assistant Professor: M. H. 
Gehle; Assistant Professor Emeritus: C. J. Maupin; Instructor: J. R. West; 
Extension Specialist: C. E. Brewer 

The Department of Poultry Science provides instruction in the principles of 
poultry husbandry and in such related fields as nutrition, physiology, genetics 
and pathology. 

Through teaching, research and extension the department serves students, 
poultrymen and allied industries. The production of poultry has increased rapidly 
during the last two decades. Poultry products rank second in North Carolina as a 
source of agricultural income. North Carolina ranks fourth nationally in the 
production of poultry products; the climatic and economic conditions in the State 
provide a sound base for continued expansion of poultry enterprises. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The change from small farm operations to large commercial poultry enterprises 
has created more specialized positions than are being filled by available poultry 
graduates. Off-the-farm operations in activities such as processing and distribu- 
tion offer new job opportunities. The allied industries providing such services as 
feed, equipment, financing and drugs need more employees who have been trained 
in poultry science. Graduates hold positions as managers and field representatives 
for numerous businesses identified with or serving the poultry industry. Graduates 
are also employed in the areas of communication and public relations and as 
teachers and extension and research specialists. A number of graduates have estab- 
lished their own successful poultry business. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

Students desiring the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in poultry science 
may choose any of the three curricula offered by the School of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences. One may obtain a double major in certain other curricula through 
careful use of electives and/or summer school attendance. The student should con- 
sult the undergraduate advisers in the departments concerned. 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 65-70. 



103 



POULTRY SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

BUSINESS PROGRAM 

The curriculum may be selected by students desiring a background related to 
the operation and management of business firms on a sound economic basis. The 
general requirements for the business program are listed on pages 66-67. In addition, 
there are 26 hours of departmental requirements. These requirements include the 
poultry courses listed in the science curriculum below. PO 524 (ZO 524), Com- 
parative Endocrinology, is not required. Additions are PO 301, Evaluation of 
Live Poultry, and PO 402, Commercial Poultry Enterprises. CH 103, General 
Chemistry II, may be substituted for CH 107, Principles of Chemistry. Should this 
substitution be made, the student is required to take CH 220, Introductory Organic 
Chemistry, instead of CH 221, Organic Chemistry I. 

TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

This curriculum is designed for the student who has an interest in the basic 
biological and physical sciences as greater emphasis is placed thereon. The 
student is better prepared for advanced study in various disciplines such as 
genetics, nutrition, physiology, and pathology. Several preveterinary students are 
currently enrolled in the curriculum. 

For the freshman year, see pages 65-66. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

English Elective 3 MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production . . 4 PO 405 Avian Physiology 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 Group A Elective 4 

or Group B or C Elective 3 

PY 211, PY 212 General Physics 8 Social Science and Humanities Elective ... 6 

Social Science and Humanities Electives .... 9 Free Electives 6 

Physical Education 2 — 

34 



31 or 34 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits 

PO 401 Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 404 (FS 404) Poultry Products 3 

PO 415 (ANS 415, NTR 415) Comparative 

Nutrition 3 

PO 490 Poultry Seminar 1 

PO 520 (GN 520) Poultry Breeding 3 

PO 524 (ZO 524) Comparative 

Endocrinology 4 

Group A Elective (If PY 212 is not taken) .4 or 8 

Group B or C Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 

31 or 35 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

The student desiring a more generalized program of study should select this 
curriculum which offers a greater selection of courses in the applied science and 
technology areas. The requirements for the sophomore and junior years are the 

104 



same as for the science curriculum as modified by the changes noted in Group A 
and departmental requirements for the business curriculum. The Group D 
courses required are indicated on page 70. 

SENIOR YEAR 

Credits 

PO 401 Poultry Diseases 4 

PO 404 (FS 404) Poultry Products 3 

PO 415 (ANS 415, NTR 415) Comparative 

Nutrition 3 

PO 490 Poultry Seminar 1 

PO 520 (GN 520) Poultry Breeding 3 

Group A Elective 4 

Group A, B or C Electives 7 or 11 

Free Electives 6 

31 or 35 
Total Hours for Graduation 130 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Poultry Science offers the Master of Science degree in 
poultry science; doctoral programs in physiology, genetics, microbiology, and 
nutrition; and a professional master's program. Prospective applicants should 
consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



PREMEDICAL SCIENCES 

Gardner Hall 

Premedical, predental and preveterinary curricula are offered in the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. Requirements for all the premedical sciences are 
similar. Requirements may be met either through the science curriculum or the 
biological sciences curriculum. A number of students are accepted each year in 
leading medical colleges; several have received outstanding scholarships. 

For further details on the preveterinary curriculum, see the following section. 

For the premedical and predental details, see zoology, pages 110-114, and the 
biological sciences curriculum, pages 78-81. 

PREVETERINARY 

Grinnells Animal Health Laboratory 

Scott and Patterson Halls 

E. G. Batte, Adviser, Animal Science 
G. B. Creed, Adviser, Animal Science 
J. R. Harris, Adviser, Poultry Science 
D. J. Moncol, Adviser, Animal Science 
W. M. Colwell, Adviser, Poultry Science 

D. G. Simmons, Adviser, Poultry Science 

E. W. Glazener, Secretary, N. C. Veterinary Certification Committee 

A preveterinary curriculum is offered as part of the North Carolina Veterinary 
Program. After the completion of the prescribed program North Carolina students 
are nominated to attend the University of Georgia, Oklahoma State University, 
Tuskegee Institute and other colleges of veterinary medicine in which the State 
has made arrangements through the Southern Regional Education Board for 
these students to attend at in-state tuition rates. 

If three years are completed in the preveterinary curriculum, some course 
credits may be transferred from the veterinary program to North Carolina State 

105 



toward the completion of a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in animal 
science, poultry science of zoology. Arrangements for this procedure are made prior 
to entrance into the veterinary school. 

CURRICULUM 

The preveterinary program is offered under the science curriculum of the 
School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

PREVETERINARY CURRICULUM 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

The courses listed below are minimum requirements for all students applying 
for entrance to veterinary school under the Southern Regional Education Board 
contract. Only those students who complete the required courses successfully 
(grade C or better on each) will be considered eligible to apply. A 2.7 grade-point 
average on required courses is the minimum that the North Carolina Veterinary 
Certification Committee will recommend for attending any veterinary school. 



Language 
(9 Credits) 

Credits 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

English Elective 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(12 Credits) 

PS 201 The American Governmental 

System 3 

Group D Electives 9 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
U0-4S Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 



CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

PY 211, PY 212 General Physics 8 

ZO 223 Comparative Anatomy 4 

Applied Science and Technology 
(11 Credits) 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal 

Science 4 

ANS 204 Livestock Feeds and Feeding .... 3 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production ... 4 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

(Also see liberal arts.) 
1911 Building 
Professor S. C. Mayo, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: L. W. Drabick, C. P. Marsh, G. C. McCann, J. N. Young; WNR 
Professor Emeritus: C. H. Hamilton; Associate Professors: A. C. Davis, 
C. V. Mercer, H. D. Rawls, M. M. Sawhney, Odell Uzzell; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: W. J. Buffaloe, R. L. Rollins Jr.; Assistant Professors: R. C. 
Brisson, W. B. Clifford II, C. G. Dawson, G. L. Faulkner, T. M. Hyman, 
K. D. Kim, R. L. Moxley, R. D. Mustian, J. G. Peck, D. J. Steffensmeier, 
Elizabeth M. Suval, Patricia L. Tobin; Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. L. 
Franklin; Instructors: Linda M. Breytspraak, D. F. Collins, S. H. Heik- 
kinen, W. B. Hutchinson, G. S. Nickerson, L. J. Rhoades, R. C. Wimberley 



106 



EXTENSION 

Associate Professor J. N. Collins, In Charge of Community Development 

Professor: J. D. George; Professor Emeritus: J. W. Crawford; Associate Pro- 
fessor: T. N. Hobgood Jr., M. E. Voland; Assistant Professors: J. A. Chris- 
tenson, V. E. Hamilton, C. E. Lewis, J. M. Stewart, P. P. Thompson 

The major aim of this department is to teach students the principles and tech- 
niques for understanding human group behavior. More specifically the depart- 
ment seeks: (1) to train students to become leaders in organizing groups and 
communities and in administering their programs; (2) to qualify exceptional 
students on the undergraduate and graduate levels for sociological research, 
teaching and extension work; (3) to solve problems in human group relations 
through scientific research; and (4) to extend research results to the people of the 
State. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in sociology is offered under 
the science curriculum of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 



CURRICULUM IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

For the freshman year and basic requirements see pages 65-70. 

Group A Courses Departmental Requirements and Electives 

(26 Credits) (26 Credits) 

Credits ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

or SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 3 i2£ *" S"*! t?^?~ ? S \ 11 3 

SOC 342 Rural Societies Around the 



GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Electives* 17 



World 3 

SOC 411 Community Relationships .... 3 

SOC 416 Research Methods 3 

Electives 8 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



* Six credits may be elected from Groups B and C; additional electives, from Group D. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Master of Science, Master of Sociology and Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
are offered by this department. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate 
School Catalog. 



SOIL SCIENCE 

Williams Hall 

Professor C. B. McCants, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: W. V. Bartholomew, S. W. Buol, M. G. Cook, R. B. Daniels 
(USDA), C. B. Davey, J. W. Fitts (AID), W. A. Jackson, E. J. Kamprath, 



107 



J. F. Lutz, R. J. McCracken, R. J. Volk, J. B. Weber, S. B. Weed, W. G. 
Woltz, W. W. Woodhouse Jr.; Adjunct Professors: L. J. Metz, J. M. Spain; 
Associate Professors: F. R. Cox, G. A. Cummings, J. W. Gilliam, J. D. Hesketh 
(USD A); R. E. McCollum, A. G. Wollum II; Associate Professors Emeriti: 
W. D. Lee. A, Mehlich. W. H. Rankin; Research Associate Professor Emeri- 
tus: J. R. Piland; Assistant Professors: E. E. Gamble (USDA), C. K. Martin, 
C. D. Raper Jr., P. A. Sanchez, E. D. Seneca, J. E. Shelton, R. W. Skaggs, 

C. D. Sopher; Adjunct Assistant Professor: D. W. Eaddy; Research Associate: 
L. E. Aull, B. L. Carlile, M. E. Watson 

EXTENSION 

Professor G. L. Jones, In Charge of Agronomy Extension 

Professor J. V. Baird; Associate Professor: J. A. Phillips, Assistant Professor: 

D. L. Terry; Instructor: J. S. Barnes 

The primary objectives of the Department of Soil Science are to train students 
in fundamentals of soils, develop in them an understanding and appreciation of 
soils as a resource, and present principles of soil management and utilization for 
both farm and nonagricultural purposes. Soils constitute one of the largest 
capital investments in farming and proper soil management is essential for efficient 
production. World food needs of the future will require people trained and conver- 
sant in soil resources and use of fertilizers. Nature and properties of the soils are 
important considerations in urban-suburban planning and development. Also, 
knowledge of soil and its interactions with potential pollutants are useful in con- 
serving environmental quality. Therefore, the demand by educational, research, 
service, planning-development, conservation-related, and service agencies and 
agri-businesses for people trained in soils should continue to be great. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Soil science graduates are trained to fill positions of leadership and service in 
many areas of agricultural, conservation and resource planning work. Among these 
are opportunities as farm operators and managers; county agricultural extension 
agents and employees of other public advisory agencies; Soil Conservation Service 
and other conservation-related agency representatives; employees of planning and 
health-related agencies concerned with soil resources; and as technical representa- 
tives and salesmen in fertilizer companies and other agri-businesses. Provision 
is made for those students wishing a more thorough training in biological sciences, 
chemistry, mathematics and physics leading to graduate study. Students with 
advanced degrees have wide opportunities in teaching, research, service and 
extension with state, federal and private educational and research institutions 
and agencies. Also, there are increasing opportunities in support of agribusiness. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

The Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained in the Department of Soil 
Science under any of four curricula — business, science, technology or conservation. 
For the basic requirements and freshman year, see pages 65-70. The conserva- 
tion curriculum is shown on pages. 82-84. 



CURRICULA IN SOIL SCIENCE 

BUSINESS PROGRAM 

This curriculum is designed for students desiring a background in business with 
a technical knowledge of soil science. The program requires the completion of 

108 



courses in the technology curriculum and the business courses as outlined on pages 
66-67. 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

Credits 
BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Group A Courses 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

Chemistry Electives 8 

MA 112, MA 212 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A, B 7 

Group A Elective 4 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 3 

SSC 461 Soil and Water Conservation 3 

SSC 462 Soil Management Systems 3 

SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science . 1 

Departmental Electives 9 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



TYPICAL SOIL SCIENCE CURRICULUM 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 112, MA 212 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A, B 7 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Social Science — Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 2 



31 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

Chemistry Elective 4 

English Elective 3 

PY 211, 212 General Physics 8 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 3 

Social Science — Humanities Electives 6 

Free Electives 3 



34 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

SSC 461 Soil and Water Conservation 3 

SSC 462 Soil Management Systems .... 3 

SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science . . 1 

Departmental Electives 8 

Group A Elective 3 

Social Science and Humanities Electives ... 6 

Free Electives 6 

34 
Total Hours for Graduation 130 



TYPICAL AGRONOMY CURRICULUM* 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits 

CH 101, CH 103 General Chemistry I, II . 8 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 

Social Science — Humanities Electives 6 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Group A, B, or C Elective 3 

Physical Education 2 

Literature Elective 3 



:u 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry . 4 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 3 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 3 

Social Science — Humanities Electives 6 

Free Elective 3 



34 



109 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of 

Crop Production 2 

CS 413 Plant Breeding 2 

CS 414 Weed Science 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

Social Science — Humanities Elective 3 

SSC 461 Soil and Water Conservation 3 

SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science . . 1 

Group A, B, or C Elective 2-3 

Free Electives 9 

Departmental Electives 3 

31-32 



The Agronomy major is administered by the Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science and is 
listed unaer both departments. See crop science, pages 86-87, for curriculum requirements in 
agronomy. 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Soil Science offers a professional master's program and 
programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 
Prospective students should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



ZOOLOGY 

Gardner Hall 

Professor D. E. Davis, Head of the Department 

Professors: F. S. Barkalow Jr., R. Harkema, W. W. Hassler, J. E. Hobbie, 
C. F. Lytle, B. S. Martof, G. C. Miller, T. L. Quay, D. E. Smith; 
Adjunct Professors: J. A. Buckw alter, D. H. K. Lee, R. T. Rice, P. N. Witt; 
Professor Emeritus: B. B. Brandt; Associate Professors: P. C. Bradbury, 
B. J. Copeland, M. T. Huish (USDI), J. F. Roberts; Adjunct Associate Pro- 
fessors: J. G. Vandenbergh, R. B. Williams, D. A. Wolfe; Assistant Profes- 
sors: G. T. Barthalmus, K. E. Muse, G. B. Pardue (USDI), G. G. Shaw, J. M. 
Whitsett II, T. G. Wolcott; Adjunct Assistant Professors: F. A. CROSS, 
G. R. Huntsman, T. A. Linton; Instructor: N. A. Mercando; Associate Mem- 
bers of the Faculty: D. S. Grosch, L. E. Mettler (Genetics); D. W. Hayne 
(Statistics) 

The Department of Zoology provides undergraduate and graduate instruction 
in many specialized areas of the biological sciences. Undergraduates study all levels 
of biological organization from the molecular to the community. Students majoring 
in the department are adequately prepared for graduate work in zoology and 
related fields of sciences. Participation in supervised programs of research is 
strongly encouraged. Basic training is also available for students planning to 
enter dentistry, medicine and veterinary medicine and allied health sciences, such 
as medical technology. Ecology is emphasized, including wildlife, fisheries, con- 
servation, parasitology and marine science. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Students may choose to continue their study with graduate research work leading 
to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in zoology and wildlife. 
However, numerous employment opportunities are available for Bachelor of 
Science graduates. Majors are qualified for positions in the medical sciences, 
various government agencies and private industries. 



110 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in zoology, wildlife biology or 
medical technology is offered under the science curriculum of the School of Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences. Students selecting premedical, predental or preveterinary 
option may receive a degree in zoology. 

The requirements for admission to medical, dental and veterinary schools vary 
slightly from those given below in the zoology curriculum. For specific requirements 
consult the catalog of those schools where you plan to apply for admission. Students 
majoring in fisheries can meet the requirements of either the zoology curriculum or 
the wildlife biology curriculum. A nursing program is available in cooperation with 
Rex Hospital. The program for the freshman year is listed on pages 65-66. The 
other basic requirements are listed in the science curriculum on page 66. 

The student may specialize in several areas depending upon his interest and 
ability. The zoology sequence prepares students for graduate school. The clinical 
year for the medical technology program is taken at one of three affiliated hospitals. 
Students are advised, especially in their junior and senior years, by faculty in 
their specialty. 



REQUIRED COURSES IN ALL CURRICULA IN ZOOLOGY 



Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

or 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

ZO 223 Comparative Anatomy 4 

or 

ZO 351 Vertebrate Zoology 4 



ZO 360 (BO 360) Introduction to Ecology . . 4 

or 

ZO 361 Vertebrate Embryology 4 

ZO 414 (BO 414) Cell Biology 3 

or 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

ZO 415 Cellular & Animal Physiology 

Laboratory 2 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN ZOOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

For the freshman year see pages 65-66. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

Language Elective 3 

Social Science and Humanities Electives . . 3 

Group A Elective 3 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

Physical Education 1 



1> 



Spring Semester Credits 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry .... 3 

or 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

Language Elective 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective ... 3 

ZO 223 Comparative Anatomy 4 

or 

ZO 351 Vertebrate Zoology 4 

Physical Education 1 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ZO 360 (BO 360) Introduction to Ecology . 4 PY 212 General Physics 4 

PY 211 General Physics 4 Social Science and Humanities Elective ... 3 

Social Science and Humanities Elective ... 3 ZO 361 Vertebrate Embryology 4 

Advised Elective 4 ZO 350 Invertebrate Zoology 4 

— Elective •. 3 

15 — 

18 



111 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory . 1 

Social Science and Humanities Elective .... 3 

ZO 414 (BO 414) Cell Biology 3 

or 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

ZO 415 Cellular & Animal Physiology 

Laboratory 2 

Electives 6 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



Group A Elective 3 

ZO 590 Special Studies 2 

Advised Electives 10 

15 
Total Hours for Graduation 13C 



18 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN WILDLIFE BIOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

For the freshman year see pages 65-66. 

For the sophomore year see the typical curriculum in zoology, page 111. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 Botany Elective 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 ENT 410 (BS 410) Biology of Insects 3 

Social Science and Humanities Electives . . 3 Social Science and Humanities Electives . . 6 

Group A Elective 3 ZO 351 Vertebrate Zoology 4 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural — 

Resources 3 17 

18 



Fall Semester 

ZO 360 (BO 360) Introduction to Ecology . . 4 

ZO 415 Cellular & Animal Physiology 

Laboratory 2 

ZO 420 Fishery Science 3 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

ZO 553 Principles of Wildlife Science 3 

Electives 3 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 4 



ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

ZO 350 Invertebrate Zoology 4 

Electives 6 



Total Hours for Graduation 



17 
.1.30 



18 



TYPICAL CURRICULUM IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Two programs are available in medical technology. The first is a four-year 
collegiate curriculum with a Bachelor of Science degree in zoology (see above) 
followed by a year of training in any hospital clinical laboratory approved by the 
American Medical Association. The second program is designed to be 
completed in four calendar years. The student takes the prescribed curriculum 
for three years at North Carolina State University and a fourth year (12 months) 
of clinical training at an affiliated hospital. Successful completion of this program 
qualifies the student for a Bachelor of Science degree in medical technology from 
North Carolina State University. Acceptance by the clinical laboratory is competi- 
tive and students in either program outlined above must apply for clinical training. 
After completion of either program the student is eligible to take the national 
examination of the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists. 

For the freshman year see pages 65-66. 



112 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 Language or English Elective 3 

Language or English Elective 3 MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Social Science and Humanities Elective . . 3 PY 221 College Physics 5 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 Social Science and Humanities Elective ... 3 

Elective 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 — 

— 16 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

Social Science and Humanities Elective ... 3 Social Science and Humanities Electives . . 6 

Advised Elective 3 ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology 3 

ZO 223 Comparative Anatomy 4 or 

Elective 3 ZO 414 (BO 414) Cell Biology 3 

— ZO 415 Cellular & Animal Physiology 

17 Laboratory 2 

Elective 3 

18 
Credit Hours Through Junior Year . . 100 

SENIOR YEAR 

A 12-month course in medical technology is to be taken at an affiliated hospital 
clinical laboratory. 

Hours 

Microbiology 10.0 

Bacteriology 

Mycobacteriology 

Mycology 

Parasitology 

Chemistry 8.5 

Nuclear Medicine 1.5 

Hematology 7.5 

Urinalysis 2.5 

Blood Bank 3.5 

Serology 3.5 

Histology 1.5 

Coagulation 1.5 

Total 40.0 

For curricula in conservation see pages 82-85. 

OPTIONS IN ZOOLOGY CURRICULUM 

Students desiring to emphasize certain areas within zoology may choose an 
option : 

PREMEDICAL OR PREDENTAL OPTION IN ZOOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Departmental Requirements 

General Physics 8 

Comparative Anatomy 4 

Organic Chemistry I, II 8 

Quantitative Analysis 4 

Genetics 4 

Physiology 4-8 

Embryology 4 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



113 



FISHERIES OPTION IN ZOOLOGY 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Physiology 5 

Limnology 4 

Ecology 4 

Ichthyology 4 

Fishery Science 3 

Economic Insects 3 

Advised Electives 4 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Zoology offers to qualified students the Master of Science 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees and a professional master's program. Pro- 
spective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

J. E. Legates, Dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
J. C. Wiluamson Jr., Director of Reasearch 

The Agricultural Experiment Station is the agricultural and forestry research 
agency of the State of North Carolina. It is funded principally by appropriations 
from the North Carolina General Assembly and an allocation of federal funds. 

The purpose of the Agricultural Experiment Station is to conduct research 
bearing directly on or contributing to: (1) the development and maintenance of an 
effective agricultural and forestry industry in North Carolina, including economic- 
ally sound sources of supplies and equipment needed in agriculture and forestry 
and market outlets for the products of agriculture and forestry, (2) the improvement 
of rural homes, rural life and rural environment, and (3) the maintenance of a 
reliable supply of agricultural and forestry products for the consuming public. This 
requires research to solve currently pressing problems and research to provide a 
foundation of scientific knowledge in the biological, physical and social sciences 
essential in solving problems. 

The faculty of the research station conducts experiments in the greenhouse and 
laboratories of the University and throughout the State on 15 strategically located 
experimental farms and on farm land rented for short periods. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station faculty brings to the University experts, 
whose teaching in many specialized fields of agriculture assures the maintenance 
of curricula of high standards. It contributes to the advanced training of students 
who are destined to become the leaders, teachers and investigators necessary in 
the maintenance of agriculture on sound and economic planes. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Agricultural Experiment Station publishes bulletins and scientific papers 
on research results conducted by the staff. Single copies of these publications are 
sent free upon request to anyone in the State. 

SERVICES 

The staff diagnoses and interprets problems for farmers and agribusiness firms 
in North Carolina. It counsels farmers and others interested in the agricultural 
and forestry industry, presents radio programs devoted to the discussion of farm and 
forestry procedures, and writes letters on more specific problems of agriculture 
at the request of farmers, garden clubs members, and manufacturers of fertilizer, 

114 



fundicides and insecticides. It also takes part in several administrative functions of 
the University. 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

J. E. Legates, Dean of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
George Hyatt Jr., Director of the Agricultural Extension Service 

The Agricultural Extension Service of North Carolina State University is a 
cooperative undertaking among the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the State of 
North Carolina and the 100 counties in the State. Its work is supported by federal 
funds made available under the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, as amended, and by state 
and county appropriations. 

The federal and state appropriations are used to maintain an administrative 
and specialist staff and to pay a portion of the salary and the travel expenses of the 
county extension agents. Under this cooperative arrangement, the Agricultural 
Extension Service serves as the "educational arm" of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and as the "field faculty" of North Carolina State University in the 
areas of agriculture, production and marketing, family living, 4-H and youth, 
community and natural resource development and environmental quality. 

OBJECTIVES 

The primary purpose of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service is 
to take to the people of the State the latest and best information obtainable — 
particularly that which is related to agriculture and home economics — and help 
them to interpret and use this information in building a more prosperous and 
satisfying life. 

To accomplish this purpose, the institution maintains a staff of trained spec- 
ialists in each of the major subject matter areas. These specialists work primarily 
with and through the county agricultural and home economics agents in the con- 
duct of a statewide educational program. 

This program has sufficient flexibility to permit special attention to the prob- 
lems, needs and interests of the people in each county. Educational assistance is 
given to individuals, families, industrial processing and marketing firms, other 
businesses and certain organizations. This includes work with adult men and 
women and boys and girls in both the city and the rural areas. 

In carrying out this educational program, a variety of methods and techniques 
are employed: method and result demonstrations; meetings; visits to farms, 
homes and businesses; organized groups of men, women and youths; tours; 
leaflets, pamphlets and other printed materials, and mass media. 

The basic sources of information to be taught through this educational program 
are the findings and recommendations resulting from research conducted by 
experiment stations in this and other states and by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

Patterson Hall 

J. E. Legates, Dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Edward W. Glazener, Director of Academic Affairs 

H. B. Craig, Assistant Director of Academic Affairs and Director of the Agri- 
cultural Institute 

A two-year program in agriculture was approved and money was appropri- 
ated for this purpose by the 1959 General Assembly. 

115 



This two-year program, named the North Carolina Agricultural Institute, operates 
at North Carolina State University. 

The major objective of the Agricultural Institute is to provide technical training 
to the individual so that he may become more productive in an agricultural society. 
Specifically, instruction offered by the Agricultural Institute is designed to train 
men and women for those jobs in agriculture and related occupations that require 
technicians with education beyond the high school level. An individual with this 
type of training should have a better income, assume a more prominent role of 
leadership, and become an asset to agriculture and to his community. 

The institutional programs of the Agricultural Institute are organized and 
conducted as a part of the over-all resident instruction program for the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Institute is an addition to, and not a substitute 
for, the regular degree granting program of the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. However, in order to provide students enrolled in the Institute with the 
best possible technical training, the faculty in residence for the four-year pro- 
grams are responsible for organizing and teaching courses offered by the Institute. 

People who have training similar to that which can be obtained in the courses 
offered in the Agricultural Institute are in demand by agricultural industries. As 
this demand changes, courses of study will be evaluated and alterations will be 
made to keep abreast of the times. Through such a system the programs provided 
by the Institute are aiding the technical manpower needs of agriculture in North 
Carolina. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Rapid technical advancement has been extremely important in changing agri- 
culture from a small production industry to one of the largest industries in the 
nation. Today, the farmer uses scientifically developed seed, feed and fertilizer, 
does most of his work with machinery, and has scientific testing to support his 
management decisions. Increased production has allowed him to sell much of his 
production rather than just the surplus above home consumption. Farms have 
become larger due to these technological advances, and large amounts of capital 
are needed to operate successfully. All of these factors bring about dependence 
on outside sources of information and capital for success in a modern agricultural 
business. 

Not only the person who farms, but the hundreds of related businesses that are 
a vital part of agriculture today, cannot operate successfully without men trained 
in technical skills. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Any individual who has received a diploma from an accredited high school or 
has passed the high school equivalency examination administered by the State 
Department of Public Instruction is eligible for entry into the Agricultural Insti- 
tute. Each application will be reviewed and evaluated by the Institute Director 
before an applicant will be accepted. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The ten programs of study currently offered are: agricultural equipment tech- 
nology, field crops technology, flower and nursery crops technology, general agri- 
culture, livestock management and technology (animal husbandry option and 
dairy husbandry option), pest control (agricultural pest control and urban and 
industrial pest control), soil technology and turfgrass management. 

TYPE OF DEGREE AWARDED 

Graduates of the Agricultural Institute are awarded the Associate in Applied 
Agriculture degree. 



116 




This plant pathology-forest resources course for undergraduates includes the study 
of forest tree diseases, including diagnosis, economic impact, and prevention and 
control of disease. 



117 




Students in the School of Design have similar courses the first two years in order 
to become more familiar with the whole scope of activity in design. Then they 
select the design profession in which they are most interested. 



118 



DESIGN 

Brooks Hall 

Claude E. McKinney, Dean 

The School of Design in its brief history since 1948 has established a role as an 
experimental institution in broad fields of design. Although the school is experi- 
mentally oriented in its teaching and research, it nevertheless recognizes the 
dangers inherent in a materialist-technological civilization where there may be an 
over-reliance on the machine and the mechanical technology available for use in 
the design of man's physical environment. Therefore, attention is given to the 
larger responsibility of design, the art of humanizing the environment. Also, the 
school seeks to integrate the designer as a social human being and a scientist- 
designer and encourages and nurtures the comprehensive designer as the coordina- 
tor of the structural dynamics in the overall pattern of life. 

While the school's first aim is to serve North Carolina and the regions of the 
South, the students are basically trained, through teaching, so that they will be 
capable of working in any region. Because character, a profound devotion, and an 
absolute professional commitment are prime ingredients of any creative activity 
where social responsibilities are vital, as in design, the school fosters and cul- 
tivates the integrity of the individual. The School of Design emphasizes individual 
creative expression and at the same time encourages and develops a capability 
and temperament for teamwork. 

Faculty members have been selected for their individual and diverse personal 
philosophies and their individual, yet divergent, professional qualifications. The 
school has brought together creative personalities willing in their teaching to 
subordinate their own professional interests to the interests of their students. 
Each faculty member gives the student the benefit of his professional knowledge, 
technical training, and experience as a citizen. 

To combat the dangers of over specialization, the school seeks to develop the 
personality and character of the student as a whole. The goal in the growth of the 
student is not only the mastery of design techniques in his profession; but through 
the stimulation and the development of the intellectual and emotional capacity 
together, a readiness is developed to meet the challenge of any environment. 

The School of Design is intended to act as an educational center which unifies 
the different design professions in the fundamental knowledge and methods which 
they share; its further intention is the education of men who will be competent 
within the specific demands and limitations of a particular field of design. The 
existence of contemporary man and the greatest purpose of contemporary design is 
considered to be the solution of those requirements through full use of the in- 
genuity, knowledge, and understanding of contemporary man. Through this point 
of view, the technical and factual aspects of design present no conflict with its 
philosophical and aesthetic standards. 

The School of Design presently offers undergraduate programs in architecture, 
landscape architecture and product design; and graduate programs in architecture, 
urban design, landscape architecture and product design. 

In all of the professional fields where studies are now established in the school, 
the methods and values which are common to all designers are separated only by 
the study of the application of the work in a single profession. Many classes 
throughout the curricula will include students in these professional fields, and for 
all students the course of study is similar during the first two years in order that, 
having become more familiar with the whole scope of activity in design, they may 
then select the design profession in which they are most interested. From his 
first day in class to his last, the student is asked to design, and he is counseled 
so that he may become a responsible professional in the broadest sense. 



119 



THE COMMON FIRST TWO YEARS 

The common first two years or the basic design program, encompassing the first 
two years of the student's design education, has its foundation in the student's 
utilization of his previous development as he initiates his design education. When 
he is able to clearly define and express his interests, the course structure can be 
molded to accommodate him. As students begin the selection of their professional 
education, there is considerable variation in their directions. In order for the 
student of design to make a choice that would be in his best interest, he will first 
need exposure to situations in which he can learn to explicitly define the alterna- 
tives. Therefore, the basic design program offers the learner a range of experi- 
ences. These experiences are gained through active participation in the academic 
community as a whole, as well as through courses offered within the School of 
Design. A program that encourages students to discover various interfaces that 
occur between the actions of the participant and the environment for design is 
properly an interdisciplinary activity which utilizes the knowledge from a variety 
of related disciplines. He achieves, through physical form, an expression of the 
complex values and meanings of our society. 

CURRICULA AND DEGREES 

The School of Design offers undergraduate instruction in architecture, land- 
scape architecture and product design. The school also offers graduate studies in 
four distinct fields — architecture, urban design, landscape architecture and product 
design. The four-year undergraduate programs in architecture, landscape archi- 
tecture and product design which offers an option in visual design lead to the 
Bachelor of Environmental Design degree. Graduate programs leading to the Mas- 
ter of Architecture, Master of Landscape Architecture and Master of Product De- 
sign degree normally require two years of residence although they may be ex- 
tended for students who enter the fields from nondesign backgrounds. The Master 
of Urban Design program also requires two or more years and is open to students 
from nondesign backgrounds as well as design backgrounds. The five-year under- 
graduate program in product design which offers an option in visual design lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Product Design degree will be phased out at the end of the 
spring semester 1974. 

FACILITIES 

The School of Design is located in Brooks Hall, the former college library. The 
main building, a large additional space in nearby Leazar Hall and a smaller space 
in Tompkins Hall provide 28,618 square feet of space for offices, classrooms, draft- 
ing rooms and studios, as well as laboratories for design research. The school has 
well-equipped and supervised shop facilities. The Harrye B. Lyons Design Library 
contains more than 14,068 volumes, 25,997 slides and subscriptions to 189 design 
periodicals. The drafting rooms and studios have been designed to accommodate 
small classes, thereby assuring a personal relationship between teacher and stu- 
dent in the development of the student's creative abilities. All facilities in the 
school have been planned to provide a scholarly environment for effective teach- 
ing and laboratory instruction. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

State law now requires the graduate architect to work not less than three years 
in the offices of registered architects and then to pass a written examination given 
by the North Carolina Board of Architecture before he is ready to begin his own 
practice. Accelerating activity in building construction and urban redevelopment 
has brought about a significant increase in work in architectural offices in the 
South, offering attractive positions for the architecture graduate. The architec- 
ture graduate is also qualified for positions in certain branches of engineering, 
building research and teaching. 



120 



The accelerated urban growth of the 20th century has created an unprecedented 
demand for landscape architects that far exceeds the production of the schools. 
Positions exist in both public and private organizations, encompassing a range of 
interests from city and regional planning to residential developments. For the com- 
petent graduate, advancement is rapid and remuneration above the average. 

The Department of Product Design, which was established in September, 1958, 
as the third department of the school, prepares its graduates to work as resident 
designers with such industries as furniture manufacturing and other essential 
and important industries of North Carolina and the region. Graduates of the de- 
partment are also qualified to establish offices as professional industrial designers. 

Evidence of the soundness of the course of study and the programs in design at 
North Carolina State University is reflected by three of the school's graduates 
who have been awarded fellowships to the American Academy in Rome — a prize 
awarded annually to design graduates in the United States and affording two 
years of advanced study in Europe, providing all expenses and residence at the 
American Academy in Rome. Five graduates of the school have won the top 
academic award in architecture, the Paris Prize, which is a scholarship worth 
$5,000 for a year's study in Europe. Seventeen graduates of the school have won 
the coveted Fulbright Scholarship for foreign travel and study. The faculty, gradu- 
ates and students of the school have won more than $375,000 in prizes and schol- 
arships since the establishment of the school in 1948. 

ARCHITECTURE 

Brooks Hall 

Professor Robert P. Burns Jr., Head of the Department 

Professors: J. H. Cox, H. H. Harris, D. R. Stuart; Professor Emeritus: H. L. 
Kamphoefner; Associate Professors: P. Batchelor, G. L. Bireline Jr., R. H. 
Clark, R. W. Musselwhite, G. J. P. Reuer, H. Sanoff, V Shogren; Assistant 
Professors: A. J. Aho, D. W. Barnes Jr., E. P. Brantly, E. W. Taylor: 
Instructor: Lynne M. Gay; Librarian: Helen K. Zschau 

Architecture finds itself, upon entering the final three decades of the 20th cen- 
tury, at a critical stage in its historical development. The architect's traditional 
problem of giving meaningful form to man's physical environment remains his 
chief concern, but this task has been vastly complicated by the forces of accelerat- 
ing world urbanization and the technological revolution which is rapidly altering 
every facet of contemporary life. Social upheaval in the cities, ruthless violation 
of our landscape and natural resources, congestion and decay of our urban centers, 
obsolescence and inefficiency at every level of our transportation systems, the 
tendency toward giantism and anonymity in all of man's institutions — these are 
but a few elements in the complex condition of modern society with which the 
architect is confronted. The pastoral, the picturesque, the arrogantly lavish and 
the purely aesthetic have little relevance for a society whose design needs are so 
demanding that only the most broadly educated, intelligent, and creative profes- 
sionals can hope to cope with them. It is this type of professional that the Depart- 
ment of Architecture attempts to prepare — individuals with a profound under- 
standing of man and his cultural context, with a deep commitment to the order- 
ing of the physical environment, and with the necessary tools for accomplishing 
these objectives. 

Inherent in the architectural program is recognition of the evolving role of the 
architect. While individual creativity and decision-making abilities are no less 
important, it is clear that the architect increasingly functions as member and 
frequently as coordinator of a team of professionals — engineers, planners, political 
and behavioral scientists, economists and others — who together are able to formu- 
late the comprehensive programs adequate to meet today's most urgent environ- 
mental problems. 

It becomes obvious that no monolithic academic program can serve the require- 
ments of architecture students with highly divergent interests and capabilities, 

121 



nor indeed the varied needs of the present-day architecture profession. The curric- 
ulum in architecture, while providing a broad basic structure common to all stu- 
dents, encourages individual diversity through a major elective program of in- 
depth study in one of several design-related fields leading to expanded background 
in social and cultural factors, programming and analytic methods, technological 
issues, urban affairs, visual studies, management and operations, economics or 
natural systems. Through interdisciplinary studies in the school and University 
and through the use of outside consultants, the interdependence of the architect 
with related professionals is strongly emphasized. The design studio is trans- 
formed into a working laboratory in which analysis and synthesis become real and 
meaningful activities to the students. 

Considering the changing requirements in the field of architecture, and the in- 
creasing complexity of tasks facing today's architect, a six-year, two-degree cur- 
riculum has been established, replacing the previous five-year Bachelor of Archi- 
tecture program. The major characteristic of the new curriculum is the formal 
organization of studies into logical two-year cycles. 

The freshman and sophomore years combining general studies and introductory 
design exercises constitute the "Basic Design Program" common to all architec- 
ture, landscape architecture and product design students in the School of Design. 

The junior and senior years mark the formal introduction to architectural studies 
and form the "Preprofessional Program". This first four-year program requires 
129 semester hours and leads to the nonprofessional degree of Bachelor of En- 
vironmental Design. The third cycle is designated as the "Professional Program" 
in which the student undertakes two years of graduate study leading to the pro- 
fessional degree of Master of Architecture. 

For students not advancing to the final cycle of graduate studies, the four-year 
undergraduate curriculum is designed as a terminal program qualifying graduates 
to enter architecture at an intermediate level or related fields outside of architec- 
ture. 

In terms of its larger responsibilities in the total preparation of the architect, 
the Department of Architecture acknowledges a divided but overlapping obliga- 
tion with the profession. While office experience should extend the young archi- 
tect's knowledge of technical aspects as well as judgmental maturity during the 
period of apprenticeship, it is the particular task of the department and the Uni- 
versity to develop fundamental abilities in conceptual and developmental design 
and to provide a philosophical and theoretical basis for creative life as an archi- 
tect and as an individual. 

ARCHITECTURE CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

DN 101 Environmental Design I 3 DN 102 Environmental Design II 3 

DN 111 Perception and Communication I . . 3 DN 112 Perception and Communication II . 3 

DN 121 History of Design I 3 DN 122 History of Design II 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Mathematics* 3 or 4 Mathematics* 3 or 4 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 or 17 16 or 17 

SECOND YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

DN 201 Environmental Design III 4 DN 202 Environmental Design IV 4 

DN 211 Visual Communication I 2 DN 212 Visual Communication II 2 

Required Science Elective** 4 Required Science Elective** 4 

Electives***** 6 Electives***** 6 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

122 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Credits 
ARC 400 Intermediate Architectural 

Design (Series) *** 16 

Structures 12 

Professional Options**** 10 

Electives***** 24 

62 

Total Hours for the Bachelor of Environmental 
Design in Architecture — 129 



♦Excluding credit for MA 111, must include one calculus course. 
"Selected from natural, physical or biological sciences, but not to include math or computer 
science. 
***Four semesters at four credit hours per semester required in Intermediate Architectural Design 
or equivalent. 
****To be selected from professional options offered in the School of Design or other equivalent 
courses offered in the University. Must include ARC 331 and ARC 332. 
*****Thirty-six credit hours of electives which will be divided into three equal groups of 12 hours 
each: 

a. Social science — humanities group. 

b. Advised group — selected by student with adviser's approval to develop an area of concentra- 
tion outside his major. 

c. Unrestricted group. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Brooks Hall 

Professor R. R. Wilkinson, Head of the Department 

Professors: J. H. Cox, D. R. Stuart, E. G. Thurlow; Associate Professors: G. L. 
Bireline Jr., D. H. Ensign, R. W. Musselwhite; Assistant Professors: R. T. 
Hester Jr., J. Porter, J. Randle 

Landscape architecture is the design profession charged with the stewardship of 
the landscape. A primary responsibility within that charge is the development and 
application of the skill to arrange man-made features on the landscape for their 
use by society. Environmental quality is the standard of achievement in the pro- 
fession. There are approximately 7,500 professional landscape architects practic- 
ing in the United States. Their activities range from site planning for urban com- 
plexes, community design, park and open space design, campus planning to the 
development of regional networks of transportation, recreation and cities. The 
federal government is the largest employer of landscape architects. Other land- 
scape architects are owners and associates in private consulting firms for design- 
ing facilities for the entire range of community and institutional building pro- 
grams. 

The Department of Landscape Architecture at North Carolina State University 
is committed to preparing students for careers in environmental and landscape 
design. The design disciplines, however, are not producers of all the knowledge 
necessary to support their activities; they are consumers. The educational func- 
tion of design schools is to develop in young people the basic understanding of the 
natural and social world. Formal insights gained from the sciences and arts are 
applied to a wide range of environmental problems through the professional courses. 

The emphasis in the professional course work is basic problem-solving, technical 
competence and innovation. The latter is an extension of the aesthetic apprecia- 
tion that has been the traditional role of design. The faculty is aware of the state 
of decay, misuse and poor judgment that has become our environmental legacy. It 
is a matter of urgency that young people be capable of understanding the process 
of physical development and be committed to its application for the benefit of future 
as well as present users. 

123 






The challenge facing young designers is enormous and the reward can be a per- 
sonally satisfying, creative and essential career. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

DN 101 Environmental Design I 3 

DN 111 Perception and Communication I . . 3 

DN 121 History of Design I 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Mathematics* 3 or 4 

Physical Education 1 

16 or 17 



Spring Semester Credits 

DN 102 Environmental Design II 3 

DN 112 Perception and Communication II . 3 

DN 122 History of Design II 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Mathematics* 3 or 4 

Physical Education 1 

16 or 17 



SECOND YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

DN 201 Environmental Design III 4 

DN 211 Visual Communication I 2 

Required Science Elective** 4 

Electives*** 6 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

DN 202 Environmental Design IV 4 

DN 212 Visual Communication II 2 

Required Science Electives** 4 

Electives*** 6 

Physical Education 1 

17 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Credits 

LAR 400 Intermediate Landscape 

Architectural Design (Series) **** 16 

DN 422 History of Design III 3 

Landscape Technology***** 9 

Professional Options****** 10 

Electives*** 24 



62 



Total Hours for the Bachelor of Environmental 
Design in Landscape Architecture — 129 



♦Excluding credit for MA 111. must include one calculus course. 
**Selected from natural, physical or biological sciences but not to include math or computer 
science. 
***Thirty-six credit hours of electives which will be divided into three groups, 12 hours each: 

a. Social science and humanities group. 

b. Advised group of electives selected by student with adviser's approval to develop an area 
of concentration outside his major. 

c. Unrestricted group. 

****LAR 400 Series: four semesters of 4 credit hours each. Required in landscape architectural 
design or equivalent. 
*****Landscape Technology Series to be elected from departmental offerings or equivalent courses 

within the University. 
******Professional options to be selected from professional options in the School of Design or other 
equivalent courses within the University and to include ARC 441, Design Methods. 



PRODUCT DESIGN 

Brooks Hall 

Associate Professor V. M. Foote, Acting Head of the Department 

Professors: J. H. Cox, D. R. Stuart; Associate Professors: G. L. Bireline Jr., 
F. Eichenberger, H. A. Mackie, D. A. Masterton, R. W. Musselwhite; 
Assistant Professors: A. V. Cooke, G. Hedge; Instructor: M. D. Doty 



124 



Product Design, or industrial design, has in the last 35 years grown into a pro- 
fession of eminent significance in the cultural and economic life of this country. 
While originally concerned solely with helping industry create mass-produced con- 
sumer products of good appearance, the profession has during the last two decades 
begun to play an increasingly important role as a synthesizing force in product 
planning, product research and total product development. 

Concurrently, education of the product designer has shifted from the education 
of a stylist, concerned only with product appearance, to the education of a designer 
concerned with such varying disciplines as psychology, engineering, manufactur- 
ing and marketing. 

Since the department was founded more than a decade ago, the department has 
been engaged in training competent product designers able to operate effectively 
in any field of industry where innovation in problem solving is required. During the 
undergraduate program, the Department of Product Design attempts to inculcate 
in the student a generalized rather than a specialized approach to the solution of 
design problems. The student is taught to treat man and his environment in terms 
of whole systems rather than isolated or component parts. Emphasis is placed on 
general overall solutions to human problems from which specific objects are extrap- 
olated. 

The growing affluence of our society has created an expanding need for new 
products. This coupled with an ever increasing middle class and shorter working 
hours has substantially broadened the industrial requirements for competent de- 
signers — designers who are able to handle the increasing complexities of materials 
and manufacturing developments, as well as satisfying the physical and psycho- 
logical needs of the consumer. 

In order to achieve these ends, it has become necessary for the designer to 
involve himself in three major design and research activities: 

a. man's behavior 

b. the man-machine relationship 

c. the machine itself. 

Only the most broadly educated and talented designers are able to fulfill the 
needs of this new industrialized society — graduates who will aid in the solution of 
the numerous human problems that surround us on a regional, national and inter- 
national scale. 

VISUAL DESIGN OPTION 

The modern world has come to the realization that science — until recently — has 
not felt it necessary for man to play a central role in the history of natural events. 
In the 20th century we have found that the new science of communication media 
has created a demand for people with operational knowledge of the various forms of 
visual communication. One set of these demands has to do with people able to 
carry out activities which have come to be known as visual design. 

The history of visual design is one of separate skills and crafts which have now 
merged into a cohesive field of study. Such activities are: 

a. Book, pamphlet, and brochure design (publishing, typography, printing, etc.). 

b. Package design. 

c. Signing and symbol creation (indesical and iconic indications). 

d. Advertising design (newspapers, magazines, cinema, television). 

e. Educational and commercial exhibition and display design. 

f. Human factors information display design. 

g. Development of techniques for analyzing visual character and its relation to 
social and behavioral functions in the urban environment. 

h. Problem-solving approaches; exploration of visual means for solving socially 
defined problems. 
Working through a broad range of visually creative experience, the student will 
develop an understanding of elements and principles of visual organization common 
to all visual communication. Upon receiving his undergraduate degree the student 
would be prepared to enter the professional field or be in a position to enter grad- 
uate schools for continued study in specific areas. 

125 



The undergraduate curriculum in product design or the visual design option is 
a four year program leading to the Bachelor of Environmental Design degree. One 
hundred twenty-nine hours are required for graduation. The present five year 
program leading to the Bachelor of Product Design or Bachelor of Product Design 
with a Visual Design option will be phased out at the end of the spring semester 
1974. 

PRODUCT DESIGN CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

DN 101 Environmental Design I 3 

DN 111 Perception and Communication I . . 3 

DN 121 History of Design I 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Mathematics* 3 or 4 

Physical Education 1 

16 or 17 



Spring Semester Credits 

DN 102 Environmental Design II 3 

DN 112 Perception and Communication II . 3 

DN 122 History of Design II 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Mathematics* 3 or 4 

Physical Education 1 



SECOND YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

DN 201 Environmental Design III 4 

DN 211 Visual Communication I 2 

Required Science Electives** 4 

Electives****** 6 

Physical Education 1 



IT 



Spring Semester Credits 

DN 202 Environmental Design IV 4 

DN 212 Visual Communication II 2 

Required Science Electives** 4 

Electives****** 6 

Physical Education 1 

17 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Credits 

PD 400 Intermediate Product 

Design (Series) 
or 
PD 440 Intermediate Visual 

Design (Series)*** 16 

Product Design Technology**** 6 

Professional Options***** 16 

Electives****** 24 

62 
Total Hours for the Bachelor of Environmental 
Design in Product Design or Visual Design 
Option — 129 



•Excluding credit for MA 111, must include one calculus course. 

**Selected from natural, physical or biological sciences, but not to include mathematics or 
computer science. 
***Four semesters at four credit hours per semester required in Intermediate Product Design 
or equivalent. 
****Product Design Technology Series to be elected from departmental offerings or equivalent 
courses within the University. 

Tn be selected from professional options offered in the School of Design or appropriate 

courses offered in the University. Must include four semesters of PD 490, Intermediate 
Special Projects Series, as well as PD 421, PD 422 and PD 431. 



126 



FIFTH YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PD 501 Advanced Product Design V 



Credits 



PD 541 Advanced Visual Design I 7 

PD 590 Special Projects 3 

Electives****** 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

PD 502 Advanced Product Design VI 
or 

PD 542 Advanced Visual Design II 7 

PD 591 Special Projects 3 

Electives****** 3 



13 



13 



Total Hours for the Bachelor of Product Design 

or Visual Design Option — 153 
(To be phased out at the end of the spring 
semester 1974) 



******Thirty-six credit hours of electives which will be divided into three equal groups of 12 hours 
each: 

a. Social science/humanities group. 

b. Advised group of electives selected by student with adviser's approval to develop an area 
of concentration outside his major. 

c. Unrestricted group. 



127 



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Poe //a// houses the latest in educational facilities, including a materials curriculum 
center, science and industrial arts laboratories and child play and guidance observa- 
tion rooms. 



128 



EDUCATION 

Poe Hall 

Carl J. Dolce, Dean. 



Adjunct Professor: Thelma L. Roundtree; Associate Professors: L. J. Betts, S. D. 
Ivie, P. J. Rust, T. N. Walters; Adjunct Associate Professor: H. G. Royall 
Jr.; Assistant Professors: C. W. Harper Jr., D. R. Kniefel, H. E. Munn Jr., 
Barbara M. Parramore, C. R. Reynolds; Instructors: W. L. Cox Jr., Kath- 
leen A. McCutchen, R. E. Reeve, Alice S. Weck; Teaching Technician: J. R. 
Gibson 

The School of Education is concerned with the problems of human development 
both in the setting of schools and in less traditional types of educational activities? 
With an emphasis upon the preparation of teachers, the school seeks students who 
are dedicated to the improvement of mankind through education and who are 
sensitive to the feelings, desires and aspirations of others. 

The school is composed of the Division of Education, Departments of Adult and 
Community College Education, Agricultural Education, Industrial and Technical 
Education, Mathematics and Science Education, Guidance and Personnel Ser- 
vices and Psychology. 

Undergraduate degree programs are offered in agricultural education, industrial 
arts education, vocational industrial education, technical education, mathematics 
education, science education and psychology. 

Graduate degree programs are offered in adult and community college educa- 
tion, agricultural education, industrial arts education, vocational industrial edu- 
cation, technical education, mathematics education, science education, guidance 
and personnel services, psychology and occupational education. 

Graduates of the undergraduate programs in education receive a Bachelor of 
Science degree in education and qualify for a Grade "A" Certificate to teach in 
their chosen fields. Graduates of the undergraduate program in psychology re- 
ceive a Bachelor of Arts in psychology degree. Graduate programs confer the 
Master of Science or Master of Education degrees. 

Professional education courses are provided for those students enrolled in the 
School of Liberal Arts who wish to become teachers of English, social studies, 
modern foreign languages and speech. 

A modern, well-equipped School of Education building includes a curriculum 
materials center, industrial arts laboratories, science laboratories, as well as the 
latest developments in teaching technology, child play and guidance observation 



ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION 

(Also see agriculture and life sciences.) 
Ricks Hall 
Professor E. J. Boone, Head of the Department 

TEACHING, RESEARCH AND EXTENSION 

Professors: M. Burt, C. Trent; Extension Professor: J. D. George; Adjunct 
Professor: B. E. Fountain Jr.; Associate Professors: W. L. Carpenter, W. L. 
Gragg; Assistant Professors: J. C. Glass Jr., D. B. Lumsden, K. B. Segner III, 
Jerry Parsons, R. W. Shearon; Extension Assistant Professors: D. M. Jen- 
kins, Estelle E. White; Adjunct Assistant Professor: C. J. Law Jr.; Exten- 
sion Instructor: J. D. Dodson 



129 



The adult and community college education faculty offers instruction at ad- 
vanced undergraduate and graduate levels. The advanced undergraduate courses 
are designed to support the other departments of the institution, giving students a 
background in adult and community college education. The graduate program is 
designed to increase the professional competence of adult and community college 
educators in developing and administering adult and community college education 
programs and in conducting scholarly research in the field. 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM 

The department does not have a program leading to a bachelor's degree. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers the Master of Science, Master of Education or Doctor of 
Education degrees with a major in adult and community college education. Prospec- 
tive applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Poe Hall 

Professor C. C. Scarborough, Head of the Department 

Professor: J. K. Coster; Professor Emeritus: J. B. Kirkland; Associate Profes- 
sor: T. R. Miller; Adjunct Associate Professor: C. H. Rogers; Assistant 
Professor: C. D. Bryant; Adjunct Assistant Professor: W. J. Brown Jr 

Agricultural education in its broadest sense, should encompass areas of study 
which will enable one to participate effectively in planning, promoting and initiat- 
ing programs in education in agriculture. Therefore, the description of a graduate 
in agricultural education would be more nearly an "educational leader" than an 
"agricultural specialist." 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM 

The program in agricultural education includes education for personal develop- 
ment and educational leadership. These areas in the program are divided into 
three groups: (1) general education, (2) technical or special education, and (3) 
professional education. 

General education includes the education which everyone should have, namely, 
preparation for living effectively (1) with one's self, (2) with one's family, (3) in a 
community, (4) as a local, state, national and world citizen, and (5) bringing to 
bear the knowledge of man in solving problems. 

Special, or technical education, consists of securing an understanding and ability 
to solve agricultural problems, with emphasis upon managerial aspects. There is 
now a choice of specialty areas in agriculture, as well as qualifying as a "double 
major." 

Professional education includes an understanding of human behavior and develop- 
ment. Particular attention is given to an understanding of the learning process — 
as it occurs and how it can be accelerated. Consideration is also given to under- 
standing how people work together in groups, particularly in rural communities. 
Ability to do research in the community is essential. 

The highlight of the curriculum for most students is the student teaching semes- 
ter which provides full-time teaching and related experiences in education pro- 
grams. 



130 



FACILITIES AND RESOURCES 

In addition to the University facilities and resources, the administrative per- 
sonnel of most of the state agricultural and educational agencies and programs have 
offices in Raleigh. These people often serve as valuable resource people to students 
in agricultural education. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credtis 

ALS 103 Orientation 1 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

ED 102 Objectives in Agricultural 

Education 1 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

History Elective 3 

MA 111 Algebra & Trigonometry 4 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Mathematics Elective 3-4 

Animal Science Elective 4 

Plant Science Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



14-15 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry 5 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery 4 

Agricultural Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 344 Secondary Education 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

Agricultural Elective 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

ED 313 Contemporary Vocational 

Agriculture 3 

Fine Arts Elective 3 

PS 201 American Governmental Systems . . 3 

SP 230 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Agricultural Elective 3 

Elective 3 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 411 Student Teaching in Agriculture* . 8 

ED 412 Teaching Adults* 2 

ED 413 Planning Educational Programs* . . 2 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance* 2 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescence* 2 

SOC 416 Research Methods* 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

Agricultural Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Philosophy or Religion Elective 3 

Elective 6 



15 



19 



Total Hours for Graduation — 130 



*These courses are taken as a block in the professional semester, either spring or fall semester. 



131 



GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Poe Hall 

Professor W. E. Hopke, Head of the Department 

Professor: C. G. Morehead; Professor Emeritus: R. N. Anderson; Associate 
Professor: B. C. Talley Jr.; Assistant Professor: L. K. Jones; Instructor: 
Julie G. McVay 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Science, Master of Educa- 
tion, sixth year and Doctor of Education degrees with a major in the field of gui- 
dance and personnel services (or counselor education). Each of these degrees is 
designed to prepare individuals for guidance and personnel positions at various 
levels in elementary and secondary schools, junior and community colleges, trade 
and technical schools and institutes, institutions of higher education agencies (such 
as employment and rehabilitation offices), as well as guidance and personnel work 
in business, industry and government. Prospective applicants should consult the 
Graduate School Catalog. 

INDUSTRIAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

Poe Hall 

Professor D. M. Hanson, Head of the Department 

Professors: J. T. Nerden, D. W. Olson; Professor Emeritus: I. Hostetler; 
Associate Professor: T. B. Young; Assistant Professors: T. C. Shore Jr., 
F. S. Smith, R. T. Troxler; Adjunct Assistant Professor: W. A. Mcintosh; 
Instructors: E. A. Bame. W. M. Parker 

The Department of Industrial and Technical Education offers curricula to pre- 
pare teachers, supervisors and administrators for the public schools, area voca- 
tional schools, community colleges and technical institutes. Complete four-year 
curricula in industrial arts education, vocational industrial education and tech- 
nical education leading to the Bachelor of Science in education degree are avail- 
able in the department. The curricula are planned to provide students with broad 
cultural and professional backgrounds to parallel occupational experience. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Students completing the requirements of the industrial and technical education 
curricula will be prepared to teach industrial arts or trade and/or technical sub- 
jects. Students may also prepare for positions as industrial cooperative training 
coordinators in secondary schools. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers the Master of Science, Master of Education or Doctor of 
Education degrees. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School 
Catalog. 

VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Poe Hall 

The curriculum in vocational industrial education is designed to prepare voca- 
tional teachers for the secondary schools, area vocational schools and post-secon- 
dary school vocational programs. Upon satisfactory completion of the curriculum 
the graduate is qualified to teach in any of the aforementioned vocational areas. 



132 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates of the vocational industrial education curriculum have a wide selection 
of employment opportunities. The rapid growth of the vocational programs in the 
secondary schools in all fields has created an urgent demand for vocational teachers, 
and the selection is attractive. A student may qualify for teaching positions in 
introduction to industrial education, trade preparatory training and industrial 
cooperative training in these fast-growing programs in the secondary schools. 

Other opportunities include teaching in the area vocational schools, in industry 
and in the post- secondary schools. 

VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 Genera] Chemistry I 4 

ED 100 Introduction to Industrial 

Education 2 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 111 Algebra & Trigonometry 4 

Physical Education 1 



14 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

History Elective 3 

IA 105 Drafting 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A .. 4 

or 
MA 112 Mathematics of Finance & 

Elementary Statistics 4 

Physical Education 1 



15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

PS 201 The American Governmental 

System 3 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

SP 230 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Electives * 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

Electives* 6 

Physical Education 1 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



ED 327 History & Philosophy of 

Industrial and Technical Education 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

ED 421 Principles and Practices in 

Industrial Cooperative Training 3 

SOC 401 Human Relations in Industrial 

Society 3 

Electives* 5 



Spring Semester Credits 

ED 305 Analysis of Technical Education 

Programs & Course Construction 3 

ED 344 Secondary Education 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Electives 8 



17 



17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance 2 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Industrial 

Subjects 3 

ED 444 Student Teaching in Industrial 

Subjects 8 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional 

Media 3 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescence 2 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 425 Industrial Management 3 

ED 405 Industrial & Technical 

Education Shop and Laboratory 

Planning 3 

ED 440 Vocational Education 2 

Electives* 5 



13 



Total Hours for Graduation — 128 



*Eighteen hours of electives must be selected in accordance with the student's area of specializa- 
tion and with approval of the adviser. Remaining hours may be taken from free electives. 



133 



TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

Poe Hall 

The curriculum in technical education is oriented toward achieving the objective 
of preparing instructors within a wide range of teaching technologies and is close- 
ly coordinated with existing engineering curricula. A student enrolling in the tech- 
nical education curriculum may specialize to some extent in areas related to 
interest and/or previous work experience. Admission to the technical education 
curriculum is limited to students capable of demonstrating proficiency in a given 
applied technology, i.e., electrical, electronics, mechanical, etc. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Many employment opportunities exist for graduates of the technical education 
curriculum. These include teaching in the expanding community college complex, 
technical institutes, area vocational schools and within industry as instructors 
and coordinators of training programs. The growth of technical education in the 
nation and the large number of new technical education facilities being constructed 
will require an increasing number of instructors to staff teaching positions. 



TECHNICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM* 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ED 100 Introduction to Industrial 

Education 2 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Physical Education 1 

14 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I . 4 
PS 201 The American Governmental 

System 3 

Physical Education 1 

14 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

English Elective 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

PY 205 General Physics 
or 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 

14 



Spring Semester Credits 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

PY 208 General Physics 
or 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

Electives** 6 

Physical Education 1 

14 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 327 History & Philosophy of 

Industrial and Technical Education 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

Electives** 6 



Spring Semester Credits 

ED 305 Analysis of Technical Education 

Programs and Course Construction 3 

SOC 401 Human Relations in Industrial 

Society 3 

Electives** 9 



15 



16 



134 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 405 Industrial & Technical Education 
Shop and Laboratory Planning 3 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Industrial 

Subjects 3 

Electives** 9 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

ED 444 Student Teaching in Industrial 

Subjects 8 

Electives** 7 



15 



Total Hours for Graduation — 116 



♦Student will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in the applied technology of his or her 
choice — may be fulfilled by technical institute training or selected courses in addition to those 
required for the degree. 
♦♦Minimum of 27 hours of elective courses must be selected from engineering, engineering sciences, 
physical sciences, etc. in accordance with the student's area of specialization and with approval 
of the adviser. Remaining hours may be taken from free electives. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

Poe Hall 

Associate Professor T. B. Young 

Industrial arts comprises that area of education which concerns itself with 
materials, processes and products of industry. It is concerned with a study of 
changes made in materials to make them more useful and with problems related 
to these changes. 

The industrial arts education curriculum at North Carolina State University per- 
forms the function of preparing teachers and supervisors of industrial arts for 
secondary schools. 

FACILITIES 

The industrial arts facilities include a drafting room and various laboratories 
which include test and machine tool equipment for student activities involving 
wood, metals, plastics, ceramics, electricity and electronics and graphic arts. A 
separate experimental laboratory is provided for the purpose of encouraging ex- 
perimentation and applied research in all of the industrial arts areas at the ad- 
vanced undergraduate and graduate levels. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The graduates of the industrial arts program find excellent opportunities for 
employment in the public schools as well as in business and industry. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Comporition & Rhetoric 3 

IA 100 Introduction to Industrial Arts .... 1 
IA 102 Fundamentals of Materials & 

Processes 4 

MA 111 Algebra & Trigonometry 4 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

IA 105 Drafting 4 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

PS 201 The American Governmental 

System 3 

Physical Education . . . ^ 1 

15 



135 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

IA 209 Wood Processing 4 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

Physical Education 1 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

I A 210 Metal Technology 4 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

Speech Elective .,, 3 

Elective* 3 

Physical Education 1 

18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

IA 205 Industrial Arts Design 3 

IA 312 Electricity-Electronics 4 

IA 484 School Shop Planning and 

Equipment Selection 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

Electives* 6 



19 



Spring Semester Credits 

ED 344 Secondary Education 3 

ED 482 Curriculum Problems in 

Industrial Arts 2 

IA 304 General Shop Organization 2 

IA 306 Graphic Arts 4 

I A 315 General Ceramics 3 

Literature Elective 3 



17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance 2 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Industrial 

Subjects 3 

ED 444 Student Teaching in Industrial 

Subjects 8 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional 

Media 3 

PSY 476 Adolescence Psychology 2 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

History Elective 3 

IA 465 Independent Study in 

Industrial Arts 3 

IA 480 Modern Industries 3 

Electives* 6 



15 



Total Hours for Graduation — 134 



*To provide depth of experience in one or two areas of industrial arts, nine additional hours are 
required in one area or six additional hours in one and three in another. 



MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Poe Hall 

Professor H. E. Speece, Head of the Department 

Professor: N. D. Anderson; Associate Professors: J. R. Kolb, H. A. Shannon; 
Assistant Professors: W. M. Waters Jr., L. W. Watson; Adjunct Assistant 
Professor: Annie John Williams 

The Department of Mathematics and Science Education offers a program for 
preparing undergraduate students as teachers of mathematics and science. The 
program is designed to provide a broad background in the natural sciences, social 
sciences and humanities; depth of specialization in mathematics or an area of 
science; and the development of professional competencies needed by a teacher. 
There is sufficient flexibility in the program to allow students to meet certification 
requirements in more than one teaching field. The depth of preparation in the area 
of specialization will enable students to pursue a program of graduate studies. 



136 



OPPORTUNITIES 

The demand for well-qualified mathematics and science teachers in our schools 
and colleges results in excellent opportunities for graduates of the Department of 
Mathematics and Science Education. The rapid scientific, technological and edu- 
cational developments during the past few years have accentuated the importance 
of mathematics and science teaching. These recent developments have resulted in 
improved working conditions, salaries and new opportunities for graduate study 
and professional advancement. 



MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I . . 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Humanities-Social Science** 3 

Physical Education 1 

ED 101 Orientation 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II . . 4 

Science 3-4 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Humanities- Social Science** 3 

Physical Education 1 

14-15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . 4 

or 

MA 231 Introduction to Linear Algebra* . . 3 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

Humanities-Social Science** 6 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Physical Education 1 



16-17 



Spring Semester Credits 

Mathematics Elective 3 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics 

for Engineers I 3 

or 
ST 371 Introduction to Probability & 

Statistics 4 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching 

Mathematics-Science 3 

Humanities-Social Science** 3 

Physical Education 1 



17-18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Speech 3 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra ... 3 

Mathematics Elective 3 

ED 344 Secondary Education 3 

Humanities-Social Science** 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities-Social Science** 3 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean 

Geometry " 3 

MA 433 History of Mathematics 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

Free Electives 3-6 

15-18 



137 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance***** 2 

PSY 476 Adolescent Psychology***** 2 

ED 470 Methods of Teaching 

Mathematics***** ' 3 

ED 471 Student Teaching in 

Mathematics***** 8 

ED 472 Developing & Selecting 

Teaching Materials in Mathematics***** . . 2 



Spring Semester Credits 

Linear Algebra*** 3 

Humanities-Social Science** 3 

Supporting Elective**** 3-4 

Free Electives 6 



15-16 



Total Hours for Graduation — 127 



17 



•Students who earn "A" or "B" in both MA 102 and MA 201 are advised to take MA 231. 
Those who make "A" or "B" in MA 231 are advised to take MA 232. Others take MA 202. 
**To be selected as follows: 

One course in history 3 s.h. 

One course in literature 3 s.h. 

At least three courses from two or more of these areas: 9 s.h.- 

Area 1: fine arts 
Area 2: foreign language 
Area 3: religion, philosophy, psychology 
Two courses from two of the following areas: 

economics, sociology, anthropology, political science, geography 6 s.h. 

***Students must take at least one linear algebra. 
♦♦♦♦Supporting electives for which the student has the prerequisites are to be chosen from the 
following: 

CSC 112, 211, 302, 311, 312 EM 200, 211 

EC 260, 261 MA 300-level or above 

ST 362 or statistics at any 400- or 500-level IE 353, 401, 402, 403 

EE 201, 202 PHI 335 

E 101, 207 IA312 

Physics, chemistry or geoscience: 200-level or above. 
*****These courses are taken as a block in the professional semester. 



SCIENCE EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I* . 4 

or 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A . . 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

Humanities-Social Science** 3 

Physical Education 1 

ED 101 Orientation 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II* . 4 

or 
MA 212 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B . . 3 

or 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry* 4 

Biological Science Elective 4 

Physical Education 1 



15-16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

PY 211 General Physics*** 4 

Speech Elective 3 

Earth Science Elective 3 

Humanities-Social Science 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

PY 212 General Physics*** 4 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching 

Mathematics-Science 3 

Humanities-Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 

Required Science**** 6 

17 



138 



Fall Semester 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

Humanities-Social Science** 3 

Required Science**** 7 

HI 321 Ancient & Medieval Science 3 

or 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science 3 

or 

PHI 405 Philosophy of Science 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
ED 344 Secondary Education 3 



Humanities-Social Science** 3 

Required Science**** 7 

Elective 3 



16 



16 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ED 475 Methods of Teaching Science***** . 3 Humanities- Social Science 6 

ED 477 Developing & Selecting Electives 3-4 

Teaching Materials***** 2 Required Science**** 4 

ED 476 Student Teaching in Science***** . 8 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance***** 2 13-14 

PSY 476 Adolescence Psychology***** ... 2 

Total Hours for Graduation — 127 

17 



*Required of those specializing in chemistry or physics. 
**To be selected as follows: 

One course in history 3 s.h. 

One course in literature 3 s.h. 

At least three courses from two or more of the areas listed: 9 s.h. 

Area 1: fine arts 
Area 2: foreign language 
Area 3: religion, philosophy, psychology 
Two courses from two of the following areas: 

economics, sociology, anthropology, political science, geography 6 s.h. 

***Students may elect to take PY 205 and PY 208 or PY 201, 202 and 203 in lieu of PY 211 and 
PY 212. 
****Students are required to take a minimum of 24 semester hours in one of four areas of specializa- 
tion (biology, chemistry, physics, or earth science). 
*****These courses are taken as a block in the professional semester (offered fall semester only in 
Science Education). 



SPECIALIZATION REQUIREMENTS 

(24 hours) 



Biology: 

Plant Physiology (BO 421) or Vertebrate 

Physiology (ZO 421) 4 

Genetics in Human Affairs (GN 301) or 

The Principles of Genetics (GN 411), 

Elementary Genetics Laboratory 

(GN 412) 3-4 

Organic Chemistry (CH 220) 4 

Plant Life (BO 200) 4 

or 

Animal Life (ZO 201) 4 

General Microbiology (MB 401) 4 

Introduction to Ecology (BO/ZO 360) 4 

Chemistry: 

Organic Chemistry 4 

Analytical Chemistry 4 

Physical Chemistry 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . . 4 

Chemistry Electives 8 



Earth Science: 

GY 222 Historical Geology 3 

At least two of the three areas: 

MY 201 Atmospheric Environment 3 

or 

MY 411 Introductory Meteorology 3 

or 

MY 486 Weather & Climate 2 

PY 223 Astronomy & Astrophysics 3 

OY 200 (MAS 200) Introduction to 

Marine Environment 3 

Earth Science Electives 14-16 

Physics: 

PY 223 Astronomy & Astrophysics 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . 4 
Physics-Mathematics Electives 17 



139 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Clarence Poe Hall 

Professor H. G. Miller, Head of the Department 

Professors: H. M. Corter, D. W. Drewes, J. C. Johnson, S. E. Newman, R. G. 
Pearson: Professor Emeritus: K. L. Barkley; Adjunct Professors: R. M. 
Chambers, Gilbert Gottlieb; Associate Professors: J. L. Cole, J. W. Cun- 
ningham, T. E. LeVere, J. W. Magill, B. A. Norton, J. L. Wasik, B. W. 
Westbrook; Clinical Associate Professor: R. B. Duke; Assistant Professors: 
T. D. Gardner, J. E. Luginbuhl, D. H. Mershon, R. F. Rawls, F. J. Smith; 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: Brenda C. Ball, R. W. Oppenheim, Margaret 
N. Wiebe 

Psychology is one of the basic university disciplines. Mastery of some of the 
knowledge in psychology is necessary to practitioners in the education, health, 
social service and managerial professions. An undergraduate major in psychology 
may lend itself to graduate training in psychology and hence to teaching and 
research or clinical practice in psychology. Majors in psychology may also enter, 
graduate study in law, medicine, business, social work or a variety of other fields 
if they elect the proper courses in their undergraduate curriculum. Students may 
also choose to enter business or government positions, often without further train- 
ing beyond the bachelor's degree. 

There is a general major in psychology and, in addition to that, there is a special 
option in human resource development. The general major is designed to be flexible, 
providing the opportunity for the student to design much of his own curriculum. In 
accumulating the 124 hours required for graduation the student is required to take 
two courses in mathematics, three courses in biological and physical science, two 
courses in composition, and courses in humanities and social sciences. He should 
take from seven to ten courses in psychology depending on his interests and objec- 
tives. The remainder of his courses will be based on what he needs to complete the 
designed pattern of his education. Much emphasis is placed on the advisory rela- 
tionship between the student and his faculty adviser. 

The human resource development option has as its central concern the prepara- 
tion of students to enter occupations at the Bachelor of Arts level whose primary 
function is the fostering of the optimal development and maintenance of human 
capabilities and the prevention of the loss or dimunition of such capabilities. The 
curriculum designed to prepare these students includes a two year (freshman and 
sophomore) sequence of courses and experiences in liberal general education. A 
junior year is devoted to the acquisition of psychological or human development 
skills and extended experience in those skills through assignment to employment 
where those skills are fundamental. During the senior year students follow indi- 
vidualized programs of study which grow out of their previous year's skill and 
work experience. As a consequence of this four year Bachelor of Arts program, 
students will be qualified to enter human development occupations at a near 
professional level and they will be motivated to do so. Their other options include 
entry into graduate school in the psychological and social sciences, entry into 
other graduate professional schools or entry into positions not requiring highly 
specialized collegiate undergraduate education. 



140 





Ww**r-~, 



The Education Curriculum Center provides assistance to the student enrolled in 
education. Here a student teacher previews a sound film strip. 



141 







The undergraduate engineering student is prepared to create goods, services, systems and 
facilities to meet human needs. Advanced studies offered by most departments provide 
another opportunity for those ivishing to pursue an additional degree. 



142 



ENGINEERING 

Riddick Hall 

Ralph E. Fadum, Dean 

Robert G. Carson Jr., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

Henry B. Smith, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies 

John R. Canada, Assistant Dean for Extension 

The engineer has the responsibility and obligation to use knowledge in his field 
for the benefit of mankind. Today, a new sense of responsibility has been imposed 
upon the engineer because of the impact of science and technology. 

Engineering studies are important to those young men and women who look to 
industry, engineering education, or research and development for a career. These 
ambitions can well be furthered by the School of Engineering through its under- 
graduate or graduate programs, where students are offered technical instruction 
and leadership guidance by an experienced staff of qualified engineers and 
educators. 

The School of Engineering is organized into nine departments: biological and 
agricultural, chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, materials, mechanical and aero- 
space, mechanics and nuclear. Undergraduate degree programs are offered in all 
departments listed. In addition, a degree in engineering operations is offered 
through a curriculum coordinator. Most teaching departments offer advanced 
studies leading to the professional degree, the master's degree and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. 

A placement office is maintained by the University to assist graduating students 
and alumni with career development and associated problems. 

It is the policy of the School of Engineering to have its curricula more than meet 
the standards of the Engineers' Council for Professional Development. It is the 
ambition of the school that these curricula and programs meet the needs of the 
people and industries of the state and region through effective instruction, com- 
petent research and development and worthwhile contributions to engineering 
knowledge. 

CURRICULA AND DEGREES 

The freshman year of the studies is the same for all the engineering curricula. 
All entering students are assigned to the freshman engineering division where 
each student is given advice in planning an appropriate program of study. Although 
the entering student may indicate a curriculum choice if he has one, he may wait 
until the end of his first year when he is in a better position to judge which engi- 
neering branch of study is most suited to his own interests and talents. 



Bachelor of Science in Engineering — The four-year program provides preparation 
for graduate school or to meet the needs of young people who will go into industry 
in the fields of design, development, production, sales, application, and planning and 
operation of industrial units. 

The four-year curricula offer programs of study leading to a bachelor's degree in 
aerospace, biological and agricultural, chemical, civil, electrical, engineering 
mechanics, engineering operations, industrial, materials, mechanical and nuclear 
engineering. Construction engineering is an option in civil engineering. Graduation 
requirements are the satisfactory completion of the electives and required courses 
in any one curriculum which amount to 125 to 130 semester hours. A minimum 
scholastic record of a "C" average is also required. 



143 



Specialized Degree — A specialized Bachelor of Science degree is also offered 
through a program of study in furniture manufacturing and management. This 
four-year curriculum is offered through the Department of Industrial Engineering. 

Joint Liberal Arts-Engineering Program — Students may wish to take advantage 
of the opportunity to combine a Bachelor of Science in engineering with either a 
Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts. When the two are carried 
along together the double degree program can be completed in five years. Those 
interested should contact the Freshman Engineering Division and the Dean of 
Liberal Arts. 

Professional Degree in a Specialized Branch of Engineering — The professional 
degree in a specialized branch of engineering is an earned degree which can be 
obtained after the bachelor's degree. 

The curricula are especially designed to meet the needs of students desiring 
intensive specialization in a particular field or additional course work not ordinarily 
covered in the normal four-year undergraduate curricula. The professional program 
of study is offered in chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, materials, mechanical 
and nuclear engineering. 

For detailed information concerning the requirements for the professional degree, 
turn to pages 174-175. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The Engineering Honors Program is designed to challenge the academically 
talented student at his level of preparation and ability. While the program has a 
traditional orientation toward research and graduate study, the qualified student 
with other career goals or, indeed, still undefined goals is welcome. The opportuni- 
ties which distinguish the Engineering Honors Program from the standard program 
of study are: 1) special courses for honors students, 2) individual research or study 
in collaboration with a professor selected by the student, 3) more personal academic 
and career advising, and 4) curriculum redesign within liberal guidelines. For 
details of the program contact the dean's office or the honors adviser in any of the 
departments of the school. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A program of Cooperative Education was begun in the school year 1968-69 for 
the School of Engineering. The program, which is optional, is planned such that 
the student may alternate semesters of study with semesters of work during the 
sophomore and junior academic levels. The freshman and senior years are spent 
on campus while the sophomore and junior academic levels are spread over a three- 
year period to permit the sandwiching of the academic semesters with practical 
work experience semesters. The co-op plan requires five years for completion 
during which time the student receives approximately 18 months of practical 
experience in his field. 

Students in all curricula in the School of Engineering may participate if they 
have a grade point average of 2.25 or better. After a student has been accepted, 
he is expected to maintain at least a 2.00 grade-point average to remain in good 
standing. Application for admission into the co-op program should be made early 
in the fall semester of the freshman year; however, later applications resulting in 
fewer work semesters prior to graduation will be considered. Further information 
may be obtained from the Director of Cooperative Engineering Education, 236 
Riddick Building. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

A master's degree in a specialized branch of engineering is offered. These are 
in chemical, civil, electrical, engineering mechanics, industrial and mechanical 
engineering. The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered 
in all departments of the school. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate 
School Catalog. 

144 



RESEARCH 

Research activities in the School of Engineering are, in general, related to the 
educational purposes of graduate studies. A broad spectrum of research activities 
is engaged in by all departments of the school. The major purposes of these research 
activities are those of contributing to the scholarly activities of faculty and training 
graduate students in research. It is intended that these scholarly and research 
activities be of such a caliber as to result in useful and publishable results. 

The State of North Carolina provides research services in areas devoted toward 
greater utilization of the state's resources. This program is administered through 
the engineering research services division. 

The State of North Carolina also supports a research program at the Minerals 
Research Laboratory in Asheville, North Carolina. The main purposes of this 
program are those of assisting in the development of North Carolina's mineral 
industries. This program is operated by the School of Engineering, but it does not 
engage in extensive graduate research activities. 

SHORT COURSES AND INSTITUTES 

The School of Engineering offers approximately 100 short courses, conferences, 
workshops, seminars and institutes each year for adults and graduate engineers. 
These activities are both on the campus and at various centers throughout the 
State. Such courses vary in length from periodic evening meetings to full-time 
endeavors of several weeks; each year the courses offered are different and vary 
according to demand. The engineering faculty usually furnish a large portion of the 
instruction offered in these courses. 

These short courses offer opportunity to practicing engineering personnel to 
follow a refresher program in their field of interest, as well as to become acquainted 
with the latest and most modern engineering procedures and equipment. 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The educated engineer has a foundation in the humanities and social sciences as 
well as in his technical studies. Each student in the School of Engineering is 
required to take a minimum of 18 hours of humanities and/or social sciences, 
approved by his adviser, and made up as follows: 

One beginning course in economics (usually EC 205) 

One beginning course in history 

One beginning course in literature; suggested courses are: 

ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 

ENG 262 English Literature II, 1790-Present 

ENG 266 American Literature II, 1850-Present 
One course in the history or philosophy of science, suggested courses are: 

HI 341 Technology in History 

HI 321 Ancient and Medieval Science 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science 

PHI 405 Philosophy of Science 

UNI 301 Science and Civilization 

UNI 302 Science and Contemporary Civilization 

Other courses may be chosen from any of those on the list below. Students are 
encouraged to combine one of these courses with others in order to make a two or 
three course set, thus providing depth in one area. Suggested sets are listed to the 
right of, or below, the course list. 

Consideration will be given to courses not on the list if a student has a special 
interest. In selecting courses the student should check carefully to be sure he has 
the appropriate prerequisites. 

LIST OF COURSES AND PROPOSED SETS 

Anthropology Courses 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 

ANT 305 Peoples of the World 



145 



Design Courses 

DN 121, 122 

PD 321, 322, 421, 



422 



History of Design I, II 
Colloquium I, II, III, IV 



Sets 
DN 121, 122 
PD 321, 322 
PD 421, 422 



Economics Courses 

EC 301 Production and Prices 

EC 302 National Income and Economic Welfare 

EC 370 (HI 370) Rise of Industrialism 

EC 402 Financial Institutions 

EC 410 Public Finance and Fiscal Policy 

EC 413 Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy 

EC 431 Labor Economics 

EC 440 Economic Development 

EC 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas 

EC 448 International Economics 

EC 470 (HI 470) Evolution of the American Economy 

EC 475 Comparative Economic Systems 

Suggested sets, by topic area, are: 

EC 205, 370, 470 Modern industrial nations. 

EC 205, 370, 475 Types of economic organizations. 

EC 205, 470, 475 Types of U.S. economic organization. 

EC 205, 301, 470 Economic analysis of American history. 

EC 205, 301, 410 Economic analysis of the public sector. 

EC 205. 301, 413 Economic analysis of the industrial organization. 

EC 205, 301, 442 Economic analysis and its intellectual origins. 

EC 205, 301, 448 Economic analysis of international economy. 

EC 205, 302, 402 Economic analysis of the U.S. economy. 

EC 205, 302, 440 Economic analysis of the less developed nations. 

EC 205, 301, 431 Economic analysis of labor markets. 

Genetics Courses 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 

GN 504 Human Genetics 

History Courses 

All history courses are appropriate. 



Literature Courses 

ENG 346 Comparative Literature I 

ENG 371 The Modern Novel 

ENG 372 Modern Poetry 

ENG 398 Contemporary Literature I, 1900-1940 

ENG 399 Contemporary Literature II. 1940-Present 

ENG 453 The Romantic Period 

ENG 468 American Romanticism 

ENG 469 American Realism and Naturalism 

ENG 485 Shakespeare 

Modern Language Courses 

Any 201 or higher numbered course in any language, 

except MLF 401, 402, MLG 401, 402 and MLS 401, 402, 

is appropriate. Sets can be made up accordingly. 

MLR 303 and 304, Russian Literature in Translation I, II 

do not have any prerequisite and may be chosen. 



With consent of instructor 
EC 205 may be accepted as 
a prerequisite for all 
courses now requiring 
EC 206. 



Sets 
GN 301, UNI 303. GN 504 



Sets 
Sets can be formed from any 
two history courses falling 
in the same general area or 
time period as the student's 
introductory course in history. 

Sets 
The beginning course plus 
additional literature courses 
from this list. 



Music Courses 

MUS 200 Music in Contemporary Life 
MUS 210 A Survey of Music in America 
MUS 220 Music of the Romantic Period 
MUS 320 Music of the 20th Century 

Philosophy Courses 

PHI 305 Philosophy of Religion 

PHI 306 Philosophy of Art 

PHI 307 Morality and Human Happiness 

PHI 308 Contemporary Moral Philosophy 



Sets 
MUS 200, 220. 320 (Historical Music) 
MUS 200, 210, 320 (National Music) 
MUS 200, 220. ENG 453 (Music & Literature) 
MUS 200. ART 200, SP 340 (Arts) 

Sets 
PHI 307. 308, 309 and others 



146 



PHI 309 Comtemporary Political Philosophy 

PHI 310 Existentialism 

PHI 405 Philosophy of Science 

Politics Courses 

All politics courses are appropriate. 



Suggested sets, by topic area, are: 

Urban Politics 

International Relations 

Comparative Government 

Political Development 

State and Local Government 

Foreign Policy and Defense Policy 

Political Theory: Normative and Empirical 

Policy and Administration 

The Political Process 

American Politics 



PS 206, 494, 520, 521 

PS 222, 322, 431 

PS 200, 301, 302, 376, 421, 472, 473 

PS 473, 503, 572, 575 

PS 206, 406, 516 

PS 201, 321, 421, 405 

PS 200, 391, 500, 501, 505, 515 

PS 502, 503, 511, 516, 542 

PS 401, 461, 502, 531, 533 

PS 201, 206, 321, 401, 403, 406 



Psychology Courses 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 

PSY 210 Psychological Analysis Applied to Current Problems 

PSY 302 Psychology of Personality and Adjustment 

PSY 411 Social Psychology 

Religion Courses 

REL 300 Introduction to Religion 

REL 321 Religion in American Life 

REL 327 Contemporary Religious Thought 

Sociology Courses 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 

SOC 303 Current Social Problems 

SOC 304 Contemporary Family Life 

SOC 305 Race Relations 

SOC 401 Human Relations in an Industrial Society 

SOC 402 Urban Sociology 

SOC 451 Population and Public Affairs 



Sets 
Sets can be made 
up from any of 
these courses. 



Sets 
REL 300, 321, 



327 



Sets 
Sets can be made 
up from any of 
these courses. 



Speech Courses 

SP 340 Play Production 

SP 420 Development of Rhetorical Theory 

SP 430 History and Criticism of American Public Address 



University Studies Courses 

UNI 303 Man and His Environment 

UNI 323 World Population and Food Crisis 

UNI 401 Urban Crisis 

UNI 402 Arms Race 

UNI 301 Science and Civilization 

UNI 302 Science and Contemporary Civilization 

Courses Concerned with Man and with the Environment 

(See also courses in anthropology, genetics and university studies.) 



Sets 
Sets can be made 
up from any of 
these courses. 



Sets 



BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology 
EM-PHI-REL 590 Technology and Human Values 
FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management 
FOR 572 Conservation Policy Issues 
NTR 301 (FS, ANS 301) Nutrition and Man 
ZO 400 Biological Basis of Man's Environment 
ART 200 The Visual Arts in Contemporary Life 



Sets can be made up 
from this list and 
related courses in 
anthropology, genetics 
and university studies. 



NOTE: The 18 (21 hours for electrical engineering) hours humanities-social science series are NOT 
FREE ELECTIVES; therefore, by University rules, CANNOT be taken on a pass/fail basis. 
Free elective courses in the Humanities & Social Science field, however, can be taken on a 
pass/fail basis. 



147 



FRESHMAN ENGINEERING DIVISION 

Associate Professor R. H. Hammond, Director 

Assistant Professor: W. J. VanderWall; Senior Advisers: G. K. Hilliard, 
B. Houck Jr.; Instructors: J. L. Crow, G. A. Finley, J. F. Freeman, E. H. 
Stinson, B. D. Webb 

All students in their first year in the School of Engineering are required to take 
the same general program of courses. The Freshman Engineering Division of the 
School of Engineering advises all freshman students on academic affairs and 
arranges a program of courses which best suits one's individual background and 
talents and permits one the greatest probability of academic success. This division 
also offers general counseling service to the freshman student. 

Although an entering student may designate the curriculum he proposes for his 
major, it is not necessary for him to decide upon his major until the end of his 
freshman year. As each student earns 28 or more credits, he is transferred to the 
department of his choice. This normally is achieved at the end of the spring 
semester. 

The Freshman Engineering Division offers assistance to high schools on questions 
involving engineering as a career. However, its major function is guiding and 
counseling each student throughout his freshman year in the School of Engineer- 
ing. 



TYPICAL FRESHMAN YEAR IN ALL ENGINEERING CURRICULA 



Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 105 Chemistry — Principles 

and Applications* 3 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

E 120 Engineering Concepts 3 

ENG 112H Composition and Reading** ... 3 

Humanities or Social Science*** 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I . 4 
MA 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 2 

32 



*Those students who intend to major in chemical engineering or who expect to take additional 
chemistry courses will take CH 107, Principles of Chemistry, instead of CH 105. 
**If a grade of "C" or better is not achieved in ENG 112 H, an additional English course is required. 
***The humanities or social science courses usually suggested are HI 205, Western Civilization Since 
1400, or EC 205, Economic Activity. 

The program above is typical. Other courses may be substituted, added, or deleted, 
dependent upon each student's individual background and talents. Individual pro- 
grams might range from 28 to 35 credits. 



BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

(Also see agriculture and life sciences.) 
David S. Weaver Laboratories 
Professor F. J. Hassler, Head of the Department 

148 



TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

P7-ofessors: H. D. Bowen, J. W. Dickens (USDA), J. M. Fore, D. H. Howells, 
W. H. Johnson, C. W. Suggs: Professor Emeriti: G. W. Giles, J. W. Weaver 
Jr.; Associate Professors: G. B. Blum Jr., J. D. Hesketh (USDA), R. G. 
Holmes, E. L. Howell, B. K. Huang, E. G. Humphries, W. F. McClure, R. P. 
Rohrbach. T. B. Whitaker (USDA), C. R. Willey (USDA). R. E. Williamson 
(USDA). E. H. Wiser, J. H. Young; Assistant Professors: C. F. Abrams Jr.. 
G. R. Baughman, F. J. Humenik, M. R. Overcash, R. W. Skaggs, R. S. Sowell; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: D. D. Hamann, V. A. Jones (Food Science) 

EXTENSION 

Associate Professor: G. J. Kriz, Associate Head in Charge of Extension; Professor 
Emeritus: H. M. Ellis; Associate Professors: L. B. Driggers, J. W. Glover, 
W. C. Warrick, R. W. Watkins; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. C. Ferguson; 
Assistant Professors: E. O. Beasley, R. E. Sneed 

Students in biological and agricultural engineering are educated and trained to 
deal with problems of agriculture that are engineering in nature. Involved are the 
application of scientific and engineering principles to the conservation and utiliza- 
tion of water and soil, the development of power and labor-saving devices for all 
phases of agricultural production, the design of structures and equipment for 
housing and handling livestock and field products, and the processing and market- 
ing of farm products. 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

This curriculum, offered in conjunction with the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences, is designed to develop young people capable of engineering leadership in 
agriculture. Emphasis is placed on basic science courses such as biology, mathe- 
matics, mechanics, physics, soils and thermodynamics, which provide a sound back- 
ground for engineering and agricultural technology. Courses in biological and agri- 
cultural engineering are directed to those methods of thought and techniques 
whereby science can be applied with understanding and judgement to engineering 
situations in agricultural operations. General agriculture courses are provided in 
order that the student can better understand the agricultural industry with which 
he deals. 

Since training in biological and agricultural engineering involves two distinct 
technical fields — agriculture and engineering — this curriculum is a joint responsi- 
bility of the two schools and is so administered. 

FACILITIES 

The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering is housed in the 
David S. Weaver Laboratories. This complex of buildings, completed in 1970, 
embodies the most advanced facilities for education and research in the application 
of engineering to the production and processing of biological material for food and 
fiber. Included are offices, classrooms, laboratories, shop facilities, and space for 
the Agricultural Engineering Extension Service. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Persons trained in biological and agricultural engineering are qualified for 
positions in design, development and research in public institutions and in industry, 
and for teaching and extension work in institutions of higher education. The cur- 
riculum also provides adequate training for postgraduate work leading to advanced 
degrees. Graduates in this program receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Biological and Agricultural Engineering. • 



149 



BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

BAE 251 Elements of Biological & 

Agricultural Engineering 3 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

EM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EM 307 Mechanics of Solids 3 

BAE 391 Electrotechnology in 

Biological & Agricultural Engineering ... 3 

BAE 361 Analytical Methods 3 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I . 3 
SSC 200 Soils 4 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

BAE 342 Agricultural Processing 4 

BAE 462 Functional Design of Field 

Machines 3 

BAE 381 Structures & Environment 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

BAE 451 Agricultural Engineering Design 3 
BAE 472 Agricultural Water Management . 4 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 6 

Free Elective 3 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

BAE 452 Agricultural Engineering Design 3 

Advised Technical Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Social Science & Humanities Elective 6 

15 

Total Hours for Graduation 129 



Social science and humanities electives wall be taken according to the standard 
engineering school listing. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers programs of study for the Master of Science, Doctor of 
Philosophy and Master of Biological and Agricultural Engineering degrees. 
Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Riddick Hall , 

Professor J. K. Ferrell, Head of the Department 



150 



Professors: K. O. Beatty Jr., R. P. Gardner, D. C. Martin, E. M. Schoenborn Jr., 
J. F. Seely, V. T. Stannett; Professors Emeriti: R. Bright, W. L. McCabe; 
Adjunct Professors: H. P. Kramer, D. M. Freiss, D. R. Squire; Associate 
Professors: H. B. Hopfenberg, D. B. Marsland, E. P. Stahel; Assistant 
Professors: R. M. Felder, M. R. Overcash, R. W. Rousseau 

Chemical engineering is concerned with the design, optimization and control of 
processes, equipment and plants in which chemical and physical transformations 
of matter are carried out. Typical industries relying heavily upon chemical engi- 
neering include those producing chemicals, polymers, synthetic fibers, metals, 
drugs, glass, food, gasoline, rocket fuels, paper, soap and cement; those producing 
energy from nuclear fuels; and those processing materials by methods involving 
chemical reactions. In addition, progress in pollution abatement and control must 
come through the application of chemical engineering techniques. The preparation 
of individuals qualified to pursue careers in such industries as these is the purpose 
of the curriculum in chemical engineering. 

CURRICULUM 

The work of the chemical engineer is extremely diversified and consequently his 
education must be along broad and basic lines. The spirit of research and experi- 
mentation is a vital part of the chemical industry and even those in the under- 
graduate curriculum need to acquire the sound scientific background essential to 
original thought and independent accomplishment. The undergraduate curriculum 
emphasizes the engineering, chemical and economic principles involved in chemical 
processes and operations. The work in chemistry including inorganic, analytical, 
physical and organic chemistry is comparable to that usually given to chemists 
with the exception of a reduction of time devoted to laboratory work. The subjects 
in mechanics and materials are designed to supply the fundamentals of these 
branches. The work in the chemical engineering subjects, although distinctly 
professional in application, is nevertheless basic in character and depends upon a 
thorough background in mathematics and the sciences. It is designed to develop 
initiative, sound habits of thought and intellectual curiosity in the student. 

Chemical engineers have played a major role in recent major developments. In 
addition, the special talents developed by chemical engineers are becoming 
increasingly called upon to tackle problems seemingly unrelated to traditional 
chemical engineering. Biomedical engineering, pollution abatement and control and 
engineering for the nations energy requirements are areas where chemical engi- 
neering graduates are making significant contributions. 

FACILITIES 

The chemical engineering laboratories are provided with pilot plant-type equip- 
ment for studying the principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, distillation, absorption, 
drying, crushing and grinding, filtration, chemical reaction kinetics, etc. Much new 
equipment has been installed and new and special apparatus is added from time to 
time to keep the facilities abreast of recent developments in the field. Emphasis is 
placed on the use of both digital and analog computers in the solution of typical 
chemical engineering problems. Special equipment for research and instructional 
purposes is designed and built in the departmental laboratories. In this way stu- 
dents are given first-hand acquaintance with problems relating to the actual design, 
construction and operation of typical equipment used in industry. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities for employment in the chemical and pulp and paper industry, in 
government, atomic energy and allied fields are numerous and varied. Graduates 
find employment in such fields as research and development; production, operation 
and maintenance; management and administration; inspection, testing and process 
control; technical service and sales; estimation and specification writing; consult- 

151 



ing and teaching and many others. Students desiring to pursue careers in research 
and development or in teaching and consulting work are strongly advised to 
consider graduate training. In fact, the need for persons who have had advanced 
training in the field beyond the regular four-year program is continually increasing. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2_ 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4* 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry 

and Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles 3 

Physical Education 1 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 3 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 

CH 432 Physical Chemistry Laboratory .... 1 

CHE 311 Transport Processes I 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of 

Engineering Materials I 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 
CHE 315 Chemical Process Thermo- 
dynamics 3 

CHE 327 Separation Processes I 3 

CHE 431 Chemical Engineering Lab. I 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

Chemistry Elective 3 

15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CHE 316 Thermodynamics of Chemical & 

Phase Equilibria 3 

CHE 432 Chemical Engineering Lab II .... 3 

CHE 495 Seminar in Chemical Engineering 1 

CHE 446 Chemical Process Kinetics 3 

Technical Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CHE 451 Chemical Engineering Design ... 3 

Technical Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

Free Elective 6 

15 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers the Master of Science, the Master of Chemical Engineering 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Prospective applicants should consult the 
Graduate School Catalog. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Mann Hall 

Professor D. L. Dean, Head of the Department 



152 



Professor Paul Z. Zia, Associate Head of the Department 

Professor H. E. Wahls, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: M. Amein, W. F. Babcock, C. R. Bramer, P. D. Cribbins, R. E. Fadum, 
C. L. Heimbach, J. W. Horn, A. I. Kashef, W. G. Mullen, C. Smallwood Jr., 
M. E. Uyanik; Adjunct Professor: C. L. Mann Jr.; Associate Professors: 
G. H. Blessis, J. F. Ely, W. S. Galler, K. S. Havner, L. J. Langfelder, J. F. 
Mirza, G. R. Taylor, C. C. Tung; Adjunct Associate Professors: C. P. Fisher 
Jr., S. D. Shearer Jr.; Assistant Professors: N. V. Colston Jr., W. J. Head, 
J. L. Machemehl, J. C. Smith; Extension Specialist: R. F. DeBruhl; In- 
structor: A. P. Chrest 

Civil Engineering is one of the broadest of the various fields of engineering. It 
is a discipline that has traditionally been concerned with the improvement and 
control of environment and deals with the planning, design and construction of 
buildings, dams, bridges, harbor works, water works, water and nuclear power 
facilities, sewage disposal works, nuclear waste facilities, and transportation 
systems including highways, railways, waterways, airports and pipe lines. Gradu- 
ates in civil engineering are in demand by public agencies as well as by private 
industries. A wide variety of employment opportunities are available for civil 
engineers which may involve assignments in design offices or in the field, in small 
communities as well as in large industrial centers. 

OBJECTIVES 

It is the primary mission of the Department of Civil Engineering to offer pro- 
grams of study designed to provide adequate academic preparation to those con- 
templating a career in the civil engineering profession. To this end, course work 
at both the baccalaureate and the graduate levels is offered. The undergraduate 
program is designed to provide a sound general education and at the same time to 
prepare the student for advanced study in engineering either by the continuation 
of formal education at the graduate level or by self-study. 

FACILITIES 

The Department of Civil Engineering is located in Mann Hall. This building 
provides offices, drafting rooms and classrooms, as well as laboratory facilities for 
testing structural materials, large models or full-scale structures, soils and 
bituminous products, for hydraulic experiments, for studies in airphoto inter- 
pretation and photogrammetry, for analysis of small structural models, for chemical 
and biological tests pertaining to sanitary engineering, and for the investigation 
of transportation problems. In addition, the facilities of Mann Hall include a stu- 
dent lounge, a computation and cardpunch room, and a departmental library. All 
of these facilities have been designed to provide for effective teaching and laboratory 
instruction and to create a scholarly environment. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers two four-year undergraduate cur- 
ricula; the one, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in civil engineering; 
the other, to the degree of Bachelor of Science in civil engineering, construction 
option. Both of these curricula have been accredited by the Engineers' Council for 
Professional Development. 

The civil engineering curriculum is a well-balanced program of study providing 
academic discipline in the pure and applied physical sciences, the humanities and 
social sciences, and the professional aspects of civil engineering including structural, 
transportation and sanitary engineering, and soil mechanics and foundations. 

The curriculum in the civil engineering construction option is designed to meet 
the needs of students who are especially interested in the construction phases of 



153 



civil engineering. It includes the core course requirements in the physical sciences 
and the social sciences and humanities as established for all engineering curricula 
at North Carolina State University. It differs from the civil engineering curriculum 
in that special emphasis is given to the construction aspects of civil engineering. 
To this end, the curriculum includes a three semester sequence of courses in cost 
analysis and control, and construction methods and planning. The courses, unique 
to this curriculum, are designed to provide academic discipline in the engineering, 
planning and management aspects of construction. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

+ CE 202 Introduction to Civil Engineering 2 

EM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

MA 202 Geometry & Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

+ GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

MAT 200 Mechanical Properties of 

Structural Materials 2 

EM 301 Solid Mechanics I 3 

MA 301 Differential Equations I 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



+ May be taken in reverse semesters. 



IS 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 301 Engineering Surveying 3 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 3 

CE 382 Hydraulics 4 

IE 311 Engineering Project Analysis 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 305 Transportation Engineering I 4 

CE 326 Structural Engineering I 4 

CE 342 Soils Engineering I 4 

CE 383 Water Resources Engineering 4 

16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Civil Engineering Electives** 6 

Engineering Science Elective*** 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 450 Civil Engineering Design 3 

Civil Engineering Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science* " 

15 

Total Hours for Graduation 129 



* Humanities and social science courses to be selected from the standard school pattern. 

** Two courses selected from: CE 406 Transportation Engineering II 
CE 427 Structural Engineering II 
CE 443 Soils Engineering II 
CE 484 Water Resources Engineering II 

"* Thermodynamics, engineering mechanics, electrical engineering or materials engineering. 



CONSTRUCTION OPTION CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 



154 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

+ CE 202 Introduction to Civil 

Engineering 2 

MA 202 Geometry & Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

EM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

Humanities & Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



+ May be taken in reverse semesters. 



Spring Semester Credits 

+ GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

MAT 200 Mechanical Properties of 

Structural Materials 2 

EM 301 Solids Mechanics I 3 

MA 301 Applied Differentia] Equations . . 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 301 Engineering Surveying 3 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 3 

CE 382 Hydraulics 4 

IE 311 Engineering Project Analysis 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 305 Transportation Engineering I 

or 
CE 383 Water Resources Engineering I ... 4 

CE 326 Structural Engineering I 4 

CE 342 Soils Engineering I 4 

CE 365 Construction Engineering I 4 

16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 463 Cost Analysis and Control 3 

CE 466 Construction Engineering II 3 

Engineering Science Elective** 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 460 Construction Engineering Project . 3 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 6 



Total Hours for Graduation 



15 
.129 



* Humanities and social science courses to be selected from standard school pattern. 
** Thermodynamics, engineering mechanics, electrical engineering or materials engineering. 



PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Fifth-year programs of study leading to the professional degree of Civil Engineer 
are offered in the following specialty fields: sanitary engineering, soil mechanics 
and foundation engineering, structural engineering and transportation engineering. 
The fifth-year curricula, which are made up of advanced course work, are offered as 
a continuation of the four-year undergraduate program and are designed for stu- 
dents who are desirous of becoming technically proficient in one of the specialty 
fields of civil engineering. The following curricula are illustrative of the fifth-year 
program of study. It is to be understood, however, that a curriculum for a given 
student is designed in consultation with his adviser to suit his particular interests. 

Regulations governing the professional program are shown on pages 174 and 175. 

SANITARY ENGINEERING 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 571 Theory of Water & Waste 

Treatment 3 

CE 573 Analysis of Water & Wastes 3 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 2 

CE 671 Advanced Water Supply & 

Waste Water Disposal 4 

Electives 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 572 Unit Operations & Processes in 

Wastes Engineering 3 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 2 

CE 672 Advanced Water & Wastes 

Treatment 4 

Electives 6 

15 



155 



SOIL MECHANICS AND FOUNDATION ENGINEERING 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 524 Analysis & Design of 

Masonry Structures 3 

CE 525 Matrix Structural Analysis I 3 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I . . 3 

CE 641 Advanced Soil Mechanics 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering 3 

CE 549 Engineering Properties of Soils II . 3 

CE 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics 3 

MA 405 Introduction to Matrices & 

Linear Transformations 3 

Elective 3 



15 



STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 525 Matrix Structural Analysis I 3 

CE 625 Advanced Structural Design I 3 

EM 551 Advanced Strength of Materials ... 3 
MA 405 Introduction to Matrices & 

Linear Transformations 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 526 Matrix Structural Analysis II 3 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering 3 

CE 626 Advanced Structural Design II 3 

EM 552 Elastic Stability 3 

Elective 3 



15 



TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 515 Transportation Operations 3 

CE 517 Water Transportation 3 

CE 603 Airport Planning & Design 3 

Elective8 6 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE 516 Transportation Design 3 

CE 601 Transportation Planning 3 

CE 604 Urban Transportation Planning ... 3 
Electives 6 



15 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The graduate degrees offered by the civil engineering department are the Master 
of Civil Engineering, the Master of Science in civil engineering and the Doctor 
of Philosophy. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDY IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 
RELATED TO OTHER FIELDS 

Transportation Engineering or City and Regional Planning — There exists a grow- 
ing need for the coordination of transportation facilities and land planning and for 
individuals with competence in both fields. To fulfill this need, an advanced program 
leading to a post-baccalaureate degree in engineering with a major in transportation 
engineering, and to the degree of Master of Regional Planning is offered through 
the combined resources of the Department of Civil Engineering at North Carolina 
State University and the Department of City and Regional Planning at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Qualified students have the opportunity to 
schedule their courses of instruction to enable them to pursue the dual degree. 

The program is designed for students who are desirous of becoming technically 
proficient in both the fields of transportation engineering and city and regional 
planning. The minimum residence requirements include two academic years plus a 
summer internship. The curriculum includes the major core courses for both the 
advanced transportation engineering program and the city and regional planning 
program, supplementary courses important to both endeavors and a thesis. A 
bachelor's degree in engineering, including a knowledge of transportation engineer- 
ing, from an institution of recognized standing is required for admission to the pro- 
gram. Applicants who do not meet these requirements in full may submit their 
credentials for examination and consideration. 



156 



Further information concerning the joint program may be obtained from the 
Department of Civil Engineering at North Carolina State University or from the 
Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Water Resources — To meet the need by industry for personnel with training in 
water supply and the abatement of water pollution, students in the many curricula 
leading to positions in industry (food processing, textile chemistry, pulp and paper 
technology, chemical engineering, zoology and others) may consider courses of 
instruction in sanitary engineering for advanced undergraduate electives and for 
minor sequences for advanced degrees. Among the courses appropriate for such 
students are the following: CE 484, Water Resources Engineering II; CE 571, 
Theory of Water and Waste Treatment; CE 573, Analysis of Water and Wastes; 
CE 673, Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal; CE 674, Stream Sanitation. 

In addition to the traditional program in water supply and pollution control, it 
is possible for students to major in the areas of hydraulics and hydrology. These 
programs are developed in conjunction with the engineering mechanics and agri- 
cultural engineering programs. Further information may be obtained by writing to 
the Department of Civil Engineering. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Daniels Hall 

Professor G. B. Hoadley, Head of the Department 

Professor W. D. Stevenson Jr., Associate Head of the Department 

Associate Professor W. P. Seagraves, Undergraduate Administrator 

Professors: W. J. Barclay, A. R. Eckels, W. A. Flood, N. F. J. Matthews, L. K. 
Monteith, D. R. Rhodes, J. Staudhammer, F. J. Tischer; Adjunct Professors: 
G. K. Megla, Carmen J. Palermo; Associate Professors: N. R. Bell, A. J. 
Goetze, J. R. Hauser, M. A. Littlejohn, E. G. Manning, J. B. O'Neal Jr., 
W. C. Peterson; Adjunct Associate Professor: J. J. Wortman; Associate 
Professor Emeriti: K. B. Glenn, E. W. Winkler; Assistant Professors: W. T. 
Easter, J. W. Gault, T. H. Glisson, L. R. Herman, J. F. Kauffman, G. G. 
Reeves, A. T. Shankle, R. W. Stroh; Adjunct Assistant Professor: S. G. 
Burgiss 

The Electrical Engineering Department includes in its program such specialized 
fields as communications engineering, computer engineering, electric power engi- 
neering, electronics, electronics engineering and microwave engineering. The depart- 
mental program educates a student for any of these professional activities by start- 
ing with a thorough grounding in engineering science which is followed by funda- 
mental electrical theory and then by advanced subject matter in which the student 
has considerable freedom of choice. This allows each student to fit his program to 
his own personal needs and provides the background for success. The student may 
be preparing for a field such as antennas, radio propagation, automatic control, 
computers, communications, telemetering, electronics, the design of electrical 
equipment, the manufacture of electrical equipment, electrical power production, 
the utilization of electric power, electronics in medicine, instrumentation, solid- 
state devices or any other one of the vital, fast developing fields using electricity 
as either muscles or nerves. 

CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in electrical engineering includes comprehensive training in 
mathematics and physics — the fundamental sciences — and adequate training in 
allied branches of engineering. Most courses are accompanied by coordinated work 



157 



in the laboratory and drill in the application of theory by means of carefully planned 
problems. 

Each student has a choice of elective courses in his program. This allows the 
student to direct his program to suit his own special needs and individual interests. 
Students who may be qualified for graduate study have an even wider choice of 
courses and may coordinate their senior year with a plan for graduate study later. 
Near the end of the sophomore year, each student is asked to consider his electives 
and to plan a coordinated program of courses suited to his particular needs and 
interests. 

Examinations are given each week to sophomore students in the electrical engi- 
neering course. In the junior year, examinations are given every three weeks; and 
in the senior year, they are given about every five weeks. This decreasing frequency 
of examinations is intended to encourage the student to assume more and more 
responsibility for the success of his own program. 

FACILITIES 

The Department of Electrical Engineering is housed in Daniels Hall. In addition 
to offices and classrooms this building provides laboratories for the study of servo- 
mechanisms and control, electronics and communications, circuits, instrumentation, 
computers, microwaves, antennas, electromagnetic fields and waves, electric filters 
and electrical machinery. Also there is a student study room, a shop and a number 
of research laboratories, especially in semiconductor materials and devices, 
computers and electromagnetics. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Requirements for graduation are passing grades in the courses listed in the 
electrical engineering curriculum, passing 124 credit hours and a grade-point 
average of 2.00 or better. 

Attendance at two professional electrical engineering society meetings, one in the 
junior year and one in the senior year, is required. 

Also a minimum of six continuous weeks of gainful employment is required. This 
employment may be as laborer, subprofessional or professional assistant in any of 
the following fields: industrial manufacturing, repair service or sales; industrial 
engineering; scientific research; engineering or architectural design and drafting; 
engineering exploration, surveying or reconnaissance; construction of engineering 
works. Technical work while in military service or for a school does not satisfy 
this requirement. The student is responsible for obtaining his employment and 
supplying satisfactory evidence thereof to the department. This evidence will consist 
of a letter from the employer to the undergraduate administrator setting forth 
inclusive dates of employment, character of work performed and an evaluation of 
the student's work. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Close coordination with the work of the professional electrical engineering 
societies is maintained through the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 
(IEEE) student branch which meets monthly. Faculty advisers assist the students 
in bringing to these meetings practicing engineers. The student branch also 
sponsors departmental activities such as an annual student papers contest and 
departmental participation in an open house. 

An active chapter of Eta Kappa Nu, the national honorary electrical engineering 
fraternity, undertakes numerous important projects in addition to holding two 
initiation banquets yearly. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 



158 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EE 201 Electric Circuits I 4 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

EE 202 Electric Circuits II 4 

EM 205 Principles Engineering Mechanics . 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 
Physical Education 1 



14 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



EE 303 Electromagnetic Fields I 3 

EE 314 Electronic Circuits 4 

EM 301 Solid Mechanics I 
or 

EM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

EE 304 Electromagnetic Fields II 3 

EE 305 Electromechanical Systems 4 

EE 401 Advanced Electrical Circuits 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EE 440 Fundamentals of Digital Systems . 3 

Departmental Elective** 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

MA. PY or ST Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Total Hours for Graduation 



15 
.124 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 321S The Communication of Technical 

Information 3 

Departmental Elective** 3 

Humanities & Social Science* 3 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I . 3 
Free Elective 3 



15 



* A total of 21 hours in the humanities and social sciences, including either UNI 401 or UNI 402, is 

required. The other hours will be according to the standard school program. 
** Chosen from an approved list of EE 400- and 500-level course sequences. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREE 

A fifth or professional year of study is offered in electrical engineering as a 
continuation of the four-year undergraduate program. This fifth year of study 
offers specialized and advanced course work leading to the degree of Electrical 
Engineer. Each student taking this fifth year work plans his program of courses to 
meet his individual needs. Regulations governing the professional degree are shown 
on pages 174-175. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers the Master of Science, the Master of Electrical Engineer- 
ing and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Prospective applicants should consult the 
Graduate School Catalog. 



ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

Riddick Hall 

Professor P. H. McDonald Jr., Head of the Department 

Professor R. A. Douglas, Associate Head of the Department 



159 



Professors: T. S. Chang, J. A. Edwards; Professor Emeritus: A. Mitchell; 
Associate Professors: W. L. Bingham, M. H. Clayton, E. D. Gurley, E. G. 
Humphries, C. J. Maday, F. Y. Sorrell Jr.; Assistant Professors: C. M. 
Chang, R. P. Gogolewski, Y. Horie, T. E. Smith Jr.; Adjunct Assistant Pro- 
fessors; D. I. McRee, M. T. Mettrey; Instructor: W. L. Liddell Jr., J. B. 
Ware Jr.; Extension Specialist: H. M. Eckerlin; Teaching Technician: J. B. 
Miller 

The comprehensive educational programs offered in this department have at- 
tracted students with a wide range of interests and career objectives in engineering 
science from the most practical to the highly theoretical. The several routes to 
success have been found to contain the common ingredients of: 1) sound basic 
preparation in the engineering science subjects of mechanics, materials, electro- 
magnetics, thermodynamics, and systems studies, 2) a thorough understanding of 
the principal technological and scientific ideas on which contemporary society 
depends for its sustenance and growth, and 3) a curriculum flexible enough to 
allow the student to pursue his own personal plans to needed levels of professional 
competence. 

In most cases, the students have possessed imagination, creativity, and a 
generous complement of perseverance as common personal traits, but have also 
reacted with people and society throughout the spectrum from the extremes of high 
involvement to individual activity in research. 

Graduates of these programs are employed as lone investigators at universities, 
government laboratories and corporate research establishments. At the present 
time, a common practice for others is work as a member of a group or team as- 
sembled to pursue specific goals and tasks. Still others are self-employed, either as 
members of professional consulting firms or as managers or owners of business 
firms in a broad field of activities which includes services, product development 
and research. A number of these graduates have pioneered in originating and 
synthesizing new branches of human endeavor both in new areas of knowledge and 
in new forms of service to society. 

CURRICULUM 

At the heart of the curriculum are engineering sciences courses which treat 
subjects expected to be as viable to engineering practice in the year 2000 as now. 
To insure the opportunity for individual development in both an engineering sense 
and a broader sense, the curriculum has been made very flexible through the 
introduction of a large number of electives. Each student is encouraged and aided 
in developing a program most suited to his own needs and desires while carefully 
planned sequences of electives insure that the strength of total program is not 
sacrificed to momentary interest. 

The undergraduate curriculum involves study of the behavior of particles and 
systems of rigid and deformable solids. It treats fluids, the microscopic and macro- 
scopic behavior of materials, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. Supporting 
courses introduce electromagnetic circuits and electronics in addition to establish- 
ing a strong foundation in mathematics, classical and modern physics, chemistry 
and humanities and social studies. 

For the senior year, this broad program is topped off by any unusual group of 
synthesis courses in which the student conducts independent studies of his choice 
in real engineering systems bearing high relevance to the profession and to society. 

FACILITIES 

This department is located in the Riddick Laboratories Building. The department 
has its own precision machine shop in which to make the new devices called for 
by students in their independent research. 

The departmental laboratories are known in the Southeast for the ultramodern 



160 



facilities and instrumentation used to demonstrate, explain and explore the pheno- 
mena of engineering interest and study. 

One example is a hypervelocity gun, capable of accelerating projectiles to velo- 
cities near five miles per second, used to study the impact of particles in space. 
Another is an electromagnetically driven linear pinch device for producing high 
temperature plasma flows in the Mach 8 o to Machioo level. 

Emphasis is placed on modern instrumentation and the use of such devices as 
accelerometers, hot wire anemometers, pressure probes, strain gages and associ- 
ated recording equipment. Interferometry and birefringence, and other optical 
techniques are used for study of the behavior of solids, fluids and plasmas. The 
laboratories are equipped with the latest models of pulsed and continuous wave 
lasers as well as the most modern ultra high speed cameras capable of "freezing" 
impact phenomena in solids and shock wave radiation phenomena in plasmas. 

ENGINEERING MECHANICS CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

EM 206 Introductory Applications in 

Mechanics 1 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 201 General Physics 4 

EE 201 Electrical Circuits I 4 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

EM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of 

Engineering Materials I 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations .... 3 

PY 202 General Physics 4 

Humanities and Social Science** 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EM 307 Mechanics of Solids 3 

EM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II . 3 
EM 311 Experimental Engineering 

Science I 3 

Humanities and Social Science** 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

Technical Elective (Stem A)* 3 

Technical Elective (Stem B)* 3 

Technical Elective (Stem C) * 3 

Free Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Science** 3 



15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EM 411 Engineering Cybernetics I 3 

Technical Elective (Stem A)* 3 

Technical Elective (Stem B) * 3 

Technical Elective (Stem C) * 3 

Humanities and Social Science** 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

EM 412 Engineering Cybernetics II 3 

EM 415 Engineering Science in 

Contemporary Design 2 

Free Elective 6 

Humanities and Social Science** 3 



1.-. 



11 



Total Hours for Graduation — 125 



•Technical Elective Stems: 

These course will be selected in consultation with the adviser, from several broad interdepart- 
mental groups, according to the individual student's educational objectives. The grouped sub- 
ject areas include 

Stem A: fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer. 
Stem B: solid mechanics, dynamics, materials. 

Stem C: general, such as, mathematics, electronics, electromagnetics, systems, structures, bio- 
mechanics, geosciences. 
"See pages 145-147 for information about the humanities and social science sequence. 



161 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Engineering Mechanics offers the Master of Engineering 
Mechanics degree, the Master of Science degree and the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



ENGINEERING OPERATIONS 

Riddick Hall 

Assistant Professor W. T. Easter, Director 

Engineering Operations is an interdepartmental program of study leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. Courses are offered through the faculties and facilities 
of the various departments. Policy for the curriculum is set by an advisory com- 
mittee made up of representatives from engineering departments and is ad- 
ministered by the director. 

Operations — the means by which product and system designs find practical 
implementation — offer many challenges in today's technological society. Advanc- 
ing technology, changing economic conditions and increasing sociological and 
ecological awareness necessitate constant attention to pi-oviding needed goods and 
services in an efficient, economical and safe manner. Meeting such challenges is 
the realm of the engineering operations graduate. A vital contributer in the over- 
all spectrum of engineering activity, he assumes responsibility where the specialist 
leaves off. He may be concerned with controlling production, implementing a sys- 
tem, coordinating activity or providing facilities. Alternatively he may seek applica- 
tions for his company's products as a sales engineer. While these functions are 
diverse in nature, they share a common requirement: a need for equal competence 
in technical, business and human concerns. 

CURRICULUM 

The Engineering Operations Program strives to meet the needs of operations- 
oriented engineers through a balanced curriculum well founded in the basic arts, 
humanities and sciences. The least specialized of the B.S. degree curricula offered by 
the Engineering School, it provides a thorough grounding in general engineer- 
ing fundamentals and applications. Additional depth in an area of the student's 
interest is provided by a technical elective sequence taken in the junior and senior 
years. Three sequences — ceramics, production and electrical — are presently of- 
fered, and others are under consideration. Complementing the technical study, a 
significant introduction to the concepts and practices of administration rounds out 
the curriculum. This blending of engineering and business courses and the flexi- 
bility of the curriculum are the features which attract most students to Engineer- 
ing Operations. 

JOINT PROGRAM 

A joint program in Engineering Operations (production sequence) with the 
University of North Carolina at Asheville permits a student to take 86 of the 
required 128 credits at UNC-A. Upon transferring to North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, one can complete the remaining 42 credits in a minimum of one calendar 
year. Additional details are given in the UNC-A catalog. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates in engineering operations find career opportunities in the engineer- 
ing functions of industrial production, plant operation, technical sales and tech- 
nical administration. They may be employed not only by manufacturing companies 



162 



but also by service firms such as utilities, contractors, consultants and financial 
institutions. 

Because of the general nature of the curriculum, graduates in engineering 
operations do not normally take advanced study in engineering. They may, how- 
ever, pursue graduate degrees in economics, business administration, law and 
other disciplines not requiring a technically specialized undergraduate preparation. 



ENGINEERING OPERATIONS CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus III 4 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

EM 211 Introduction to Applied 

Mechanics 3 

Humanities or Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 

~15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

E 207 Engineering Graphics III 2 

EM 212 Mechanics of Engineering 

Materials 3 

MAT 201 Structure & Properties of 

Engineering Materials I 3 

Humanities or Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 



14 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EC 206 The Price System 



Credits Spring Semester Credits 

IE 301 Engineering Economy 3 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

Financial Reporting 3 

MAE 307 Energy and Energy 

Transformations 3 



EC 426 Personnel Management 3 

EE 350 Electric Power Utilization in 

Manufacturing Processes 3 

IE 328 Manufacturing Processes 3 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics 

for Engineers I 3 

Humanities or Social Science 3 

"Ti 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester 

EC 262 Managerial Uses of Cost IE 420 Manufacturing Controls 

Data 3 Humanities or Social Science . . . 

EO 491 Seminar in Engineering 

Operations 1 

Humanities or Social Science 3 



Credits 

3 

3 



TOTAL CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

Industrial 
Ceramics 

Basic Curriculum Requirements 98 

Free Electives 12 

Technical Sequence 18 

Hours Required for Graduation 128 



Production Electrical 



98 

11 

19 

128 



95 

12 

18 

125 



TECHNICAL ELECTIVE SEQUENCES 



Junior Year F 

1. Industrial Ceramics: (total 18 credits) 
MAT 311 Ceramic Processing I ... .3 
MAT 312 Ceramic Processing II ...0 



Senior Year 

MAT 417 Ceramic Subsystem 

Design 

Technical Electives 



163 



2. Production: (total 19 credits) IE 443 Quality Control 3 

IE 332 Motion & Time Study 4 IE 343 Plant Layout & Materials 

Technical Elective 3 Handling 3 

EC 432 Industrial Relations 3 

3 4 Technical Elective 3 

6 6 

3. Electrical: (total 18 credits) EE 314 Electronic Circuits 4 

EE 350 Electrical Power Utilization EE 336 Industrial Power and 

in Manufacturing Processes, will not Control Systems 3 

be taken (3) EE 440 Fundamentals of Digital 

EE 201, 202 Electric Circuits I, II . 4 4 Systems 3 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories 

Professor C. A. Anderson, Head of the Department 

Professor S. E. Elmaghraby, Associate Head of the Department 

Professors: J. R. Canada, R. G. Carson Jr., R. W. Llewellyn, R. G. Pearson; 
Associate Professors: R. E. Alvarez, R. H. Bernhard, J. J. Harder, A. M. 
Kamal, Anco L. Prak, S. M. Soliday; Assistant Professors: G. E. Benning- 
ton, M. J. Magazine, H. L. W. Nuttle, G. E. Tucker; Assistant Professor 
Emeritus: R. L. Cope; Instructor: T. W. Myers; Furniture Extension Special- 
ist: E. L. Clark 

The industrial engineer designs, improves and installs integrated systems of 
men, materials and equipment. He draws upon specialized knowledge and skill in 
the mathematical, physical and social sciences, together with the principles and 
methods of engineering analysis and design to specify, predict and evaluate the 
results to be obtained from these systems. The industrial engineer may design 
work and control systems for many diverse activities, such as a hospital, a depart- 
ment store, an industrial enterprise, an insurance office or government functions. 
His position in an organization is usually as a management adviser and as such 
he is brought into contact with every phase of the organization. The industrial 
engineering curriculum has been carefully planned with these functions in mind 
to prepare the student for both present and future opportunities in the field. 

CURRICULUM 

The curriculum blends a basic group of technical courses common to all engineer- 
ing with specialized courses in the two major areas of industrial engineering — 
the design of man and machine systems and the design of management control 
systems. The departmental course offerings stress the mathematical and statistical 
techniques of industrial systems analysis; the quantitative methodologies of opera- 
tions research; the use of digital and analog computers as a tool for problem solv- 
ing and simulations; the economic considerations of alternatives; the control of 
product quality and production; the specifications of the manufacturing process 
including the equipment and tooling; and the utilization of biobehavioral engineer- 
ing principles. The curriculum is accredited by the Engineers Council for Profes- 
sional Development. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student organizations within the department include a chapter of the American 
Institute of Industrial Engineers (AIIE). This student function has demonstrated 
its caliber by ranking high in the annual student award in competition with AIIE 

164 



chapters at other institutions. Departmental and student activities of a professional 
and social character are sponsored by the organization. 

An active chapter of Alpha Pi Mu, the industrial engineering honor society, 
gives recognition to the outstanding students in the junior and senior classes. The 
membership annually undertakes projects of value to industrial engineering stu- 
dents and the department. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Humanities and Social Science* 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . 4 
MAT 201 Structures & Properties of 

Engineering Materials I 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

Humanities and Social Science* 3 

IE 311 Engineering Project Analysis 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 
ST 371 Introduction to Probability & 

Statistics 4 

Physical Education 1 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Engineering Mechanics Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Science* 3 

IE 351 Product & Process Engineering .... 3 

IE 353 Statistical Quality Control 3 

IE 361 Quantative Methods in Industrial 

Engineering 3 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

Financial Reporting 3 

IE 352 Work Analysis & Design 4 

IE 354 Human Factors Engineering 3 

IE 401 Industrial Engineering Analysis I . . 3 

Free Elective 3 

~~16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 

EE 339 Principles of Electrical Engineer- 
ing Laboratory 1 

Humanities and Social Science 3 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics I 3 

Advised Technical Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

Engineering Science Elective ". . 3 

Humanities and Social Science 3 

IE 421 Data Processing & 

Production Control Systems 3 

Advised Technical Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



16 



Total Hours for Graduation — 128 



*See pages 145-147 for information about the humanities sequence. 

PROFESSIONAL STUDY 

A fifth or professional year of study is offered in industrial engineering by 
means of specialized and advanced course work. A student may elect a specialty 
in consultation with his adviser and then develop a program of study which 
suits his interests. A student may specialize in production engineering, in decision- 
making processes as related to industrial engineering or in administrative engineer- 
ing. This fifth year of study leads to the professional degree in industrial engineer- 
ing. Regulations concerning the professional program are shown on pages 174-175. 



165 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers advanced degrees in industrial engineering including the 
Master of Science, the Master of Industrial Engineering and the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degrees. 

For further information concerning graduate study in industrial engineering, 
consult the current Graduate School Catalog. 

FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT 

Associate Professor Anco L. Prak, In Charge 

In North Carolina the furniture industry ranks third in terms of its dollar 
volume of sales and second in terms of its employment. In order to meet the increas- 
ing demand for furniture products the industry is rapidly changing towards 
mechanization and more sophisticated management controls. 

The furniture manufacturing and management program is the only one of its 
kind in the United States. The generous support and cooperation of the industry 
during plant and market field trips gives students an in-depth understanding of 
manufacturing. The faculty in the furniture program is keeping abreast of industry 
problems through frequent contacts and through service on committees of the 
Southern Furniture Manufacturers Association. 

Because of the nature of the industry and the cooperation from the manufacturers, 
the cooperative education program is particularly well suited to the Furniture 
Manufacturing and Management curriculum. 

CURRICULUM 

It is the purpose of the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in furniture manufacturing and management to prepare graduates for technical 
and managerial positions in the industry. 

The curriculum stresses the application of engineering and technology to furni- 
ture manufacturing. Related subjects such as management, accounting and econom- 
ic analysis cover the business side of modern furniture production systems. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the academic course work, a minimum of six weeks of continuous, 
gainful employment in a furniture manufacturing plant is required. In general the 
student should plan to take such employment between his junior and senior years. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The industrial engineering department sponsors the Furniture Club which is 
operated by the students. All students in the curriculum are eligible for member- 
ship in the organization. The club brings in speakers from industry and holds 
social gatherings for the students. 

FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT 

For the freshman year see page 148. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

E 240 Furniture Graphics 3 csc nl Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Humanities and Social Science* 3 Humanities and Social Science* 3 

PY 212 General Physics 4 IE 241 Furniture Manufacturing 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 Processes I 3 

Physical Education J. ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for 

Engineering I 3 

14 WPS 201 Wood Structure & Properties 3 

Physical Education 1 

15 
SUMMER PRACTICUM WPS 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 5 credits 

166 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities and Social Science* 3 IE 301 Engineering Economy 3 

IE 321 Business Data Processing 3 IE 341 Furniture Plant Layout & Design 3 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study 4 IE 443 Quality Control 3 

IE 340 Furniture Manufacturing Advised Elective 3 

Processes II 4 Free Elective 3 

14 15 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of EC 426 Personnel Management 

Financial Reporting 3 

ST^r 14 ^ 8 a "? S ° Cial S e, ience t * EC 432 Industrial Relations 3 

IE 420 Manufacturing Controls 3 Humanities and Social Science* 3 

IE 440 Furniture Management Analysis ... 3 Advised Elective 3 



Advised Elective 4 

16 

Total Hours for Graduation 126 



Free Elective 6 

15 



* See pages 145-147 for information about the humanities sequence. 

MATERIALS ENGINEERING 

Page Hall 

Professor W. W. Austin Jr, Head of the Department 

Professors: J. R. Beeler Jr., A. A. Fahmy, J. K. Magor, C. R. Manning Jr., K. L. 
Moazed, H. Palmour III, H. H. Stadelmaier, R. F. Stoops; Adjunct Professor: 
H. M. Davis; Associate Professors: R. B. Benson Jr., J. V. Hamme, G. O. 
Harrell; Adjunct Associate Professor: G. Mayer; Assistant Professor: R. F. 
Davis; Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. C. Hurt 

The primary objectives of the Department of Materials Engineering are the 
education and professional development of qualified technical and administrative 
leaders for industries and government agencies involved with the design, develop- 
ment, selection and processing of engineering materials. Typical of the industries 
served by materials engineers are: aerospace, electrical and electronics, con- 
struction, nuclear power and transportation. 

CURRICULA 

The undergraduate curriculum is comprised of a common three-year program of 
fundamental courses followed by a fourth year in which the student may choose 
one of the following specialty areas: ceramic engineering, metallurgical engineer- 
ing, polymeric materials, materials processing, or materials engineering (general). 
A fifth year professional program is available for advanced work and further 
specialization in these fields. 

The graduate program is designed to permit students from a variety of materials- 
related undergraduate disciplines to engage in advanced study and research leading 
to the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Graduate degree research 
and specialization may be in ceramics, metallurgy or in a broad-based combination 
of materials-oriented disciplines including materials physics, materials processing 
or polymeric materials. Further information on the graduate program will be found 
in the Graduate School Catalog. 

167 



FACILITIES 

The facilities of the Department of Materials Engineering are housed in Page 
Hall and in the Burlington Engineering Research Services complex. They include 
departmental offices, classrooms and extensive laboratory facilities for instructional 
work and research in the areas of study covered by the department. Typical of the 
numerous well-equipped laboratories are those for research and instruction in the 
following subject areas: X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, thermo- 
gravimetric analysis, electron microprobe analysis, radiography, metallography, 
electron microscopy, mechanical behavior of materials and nuclear fuel research. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The student branches of the American Ceramic Society and the American Society 
for Metals, through monthly meeting provide an effective medium for the profes- 
sional growth of students. Programs include presentation of student papers, guest 
speakers and social contact between students and staff. Participation in student 
technical societies acquaints the student with parliamentary and organizational 
procedures which are of great importance to professional, industrial and civic life. 
Students are encouraged to attend local, sectional and national meetings of their 
respective societies. Keramos, the oldest professional engineering fraternity, and 
Alpha Sigma Mu, honorary metallurgical fraternity, have active chapters in the 
department. These fraternities are dedicated to the promotion of scholarship, mental 
achievement and general service to their professional disciplines. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities for materials engineering graduates are broad. A materials engi- 
neer may find challenging employment in a wide selection of companies, locations 
and types of work. Among the more important job opportunities open to materials 
engineers are those in research and development of new materials urgently needed 
in the rapidly expanding fields of chemical, mechanical, aerospace, electronic and 
nuclear technology. With the continued industrial development of the South and 
particularly the State of North Carolina, new opportunities are constantly develop- 
ing for materials engineers who will play a vital role in maintaining state and 
regional progress. 

Professional training in materials engineering provides opportunities for employ- 
ment in industries producing or consuming a wide variety of essential products 
including metals and alloys, glass in all its forms, enamels and protective coatings 
for metals, structural clay products such as brick and tile, thermal insulators, 
electrical insulators, electronic devices, and plastics or polymeric materials. Initial 
employment upon graduation may be in the fields of research and development, 
in-plant operation and control, and in technical sales and service. Such employment 
may lead to positions as research directors, superintendents, production managers 
and administrative officers. 

PROFESSIONAL STUDY 

A fifth or professional year of study in offered in materials engineering as an 
opportunity for post-graduate study. This professional degree program offers 
specialized advanced course work leading to the professional degree of Materials 
Engineer. It is especially designed for students planning careers in consulting, 
production activities or in technical service and sales. Each program of study is 
designed to suit the needs of the individual. The following is a typical fifth-year 
program in materials engineering. 

Regulations covering professional study are shown on pages 174-175. 



168 



TYPICAL PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN MATERIALS ENGINEERING 



Fall Semester Credits 

MAE 402 Heat and Mass Transfer 3 

PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics ... 3 
MAT 500 Modern Concepts of Materials 

Science 3 

MAT 509 High Vacuum Technology 3 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments I 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CHE 540 Electrochemical Engineering .... 3 

MAE 515 Experimental Stress Analysis ... 3 
MAT 529 Properties of High Temperature 

Materials 3 

MAT 556 Composite Materials 3 

MAT 596 Advanced Materials 

Experiments II 3 

15 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING CURRICULUM: 

For the freshman year see page 148. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits 
MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

III 4 

MA 301 Applied Differential 

Equations I 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Humanities and Social Science* 3 3 

MAT 201 Structures & Properties of 

Engineering Materials I 3 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

EE 331, 339 Electrical Engineering . . 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I ... 2 

Free Elective 3 

17 17 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits 
MAE 301 or CH 331 Engineering 

Thermodynamics I or 

Introductory 3 

Physical Chemistry or 4 

MAT 301 Equilibrium & Rate Processes 

in Materials Science 3 

MAT 310 Physical Examination of 

Materials 3 

MAT 450 Mechanical Properties of 

Materials 3 

MAT 411, 412 Physical Principles in 

Materials Science I, II 3 3 

Humanities and Social Science* 3 3 

EM 307 Mechanics of Solids 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 15 
or 16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Credits 

MAT 401 Materials Processing 3 

MAT 431 Physical Metallurgy I 3 

MAT 435 Physical Ceramics I 3 

MAT 423 Materials Factors in Design 

I 3 

CHE 325 Introduction to Plastics .... 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 



Technical Electives** 3 3 

Technical Electives** 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 15 

Total Credits for a Bachelor of 

Science 126 or 127 



* Humanities and social science courses will be taken according to the standard pattern for the 

School of Engineering. 
** Technical electives provide an identifiable specialty sequence in ceramic engineering, metallurgi- 
cal engineering or materials engineering in general. 



MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Broughton Hall 

Professor C. F. Zorowski, Head of the Department 

Professor J. C. Williams III, Associate Head of the Department 

Professors J. A. Bailey, N. W. Conner, F. R. DeJarnette, B. H. Garcia Jr., F. J. 
Hale, F. D. Hart, H. A. Hassan, R. B. Knight, M. N. Ozisik, J. N. Perkins, 
F. O. Smetana, J. Woodburn; Professor and Graduate Administrator: J. S. 



169 



Doolittle; Adjunct Professors: R. M. Chambers, R. W. Graham, J. J. Murray; 
Professors Emeriti: H. B. Briggs, R. M. Pinkerton; Associate Professors: 
W. E. Adams, R. F. Barrett, H. A. Mache, C. J. Moore Jr., J. C. Mulligan, 
L. H. Royster, J. K. Whitfield; Adjunct Associate Professor: E. C. Yates 
Jr.; Associate Professor Emeritus: W. S. Bridges; Assistant Professors: 
J. R. Bailey, J. A. Daggerhart Jr., T. B. Ledbetter, L. J. Pavagadhi; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor G. L. Smith; Assistant Professor Emeritus: T. J. Martin 
Jr.; Instructor: G. O. Batton; Extension Specialist: A. S. Boyers 

Engineers satisfy human needs through the application of scientific knowledge to 
convert natural resources and create new technical systems and processes. A prime 
motivation is to place these results within the economic reach of a vast segment 
of humanity. To identify and fulfill human needs, the modern engineer requires a 
sound educational background in basic science, mathematics, technology and the 
humanities. The gap between the discoveries of science and its application to fulfill 
the technological needs of society is bridged by engineering science and technology. 
Departments of engineering are principally concerned with education in these 
areas of applied science and the development of talents and skills in their application 
coupled with an understanding of the human and social aspects involved. 

Mechanical engineers specialize in the generation of power and the design of 
machines and processes that apply mechanical and thermal energy to useful 
purposes. Some areas of application include conventional and nuclear power 
generation; automotive and turbine engines; heating, air conditioning, and refrig- 
eration; air, sea, and land vehicles, machine tools, home appliances, manufacturing 
equipment, instrumentation and industrial controls; and pollution abatement 
systems. Aerospace engineering shares responsibility for many of the areas listed 
but is principally concerned with the design and the analysis of the performance; 
stability, and control of modern aircraft, both commercial and private, and space 
vehicles. They also focus on ground and airborne support equipment; solid, liquid, 
and electric propulsion systems, and aerodynamics — the interaction between the 
vehicle and the atmosphere. 

Because of the close relationship between mechanical and aerospace engineering, 
both curricula are administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering at North Carolina State University. There is close cooperation between 
the two disciplines in which responsibility for subject areas such as thermodynamics, 
heat and mass transfer, vibrations, acoustics, fluid mechanics, propulsion and 
control theory is shared. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 

sophomore year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Mechanics 3 EM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* Humanities, Social Sciences* 

or or 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and MA 301 Applied Differential Equations .... 3 

Calculus III 4 MAE 216 Elements of Mechanical 

PY 208 General Physics 4 Engineering 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

15 15 



170 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 
Humanities, Social Sciences* 
or 

Free Elective 3 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I . 3 
MAE 305 Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory I 1 

MAE 315 Dynamics of Machines 3 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of 

Engineering Materials I 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

EE 332 Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

EM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* 
or 

Free Electives 6 

MAE 302 Engineering Thermodynamics II . 3 
MAE 306 Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory II 1 

MAE 316 Strength of Mechanical 

Components 3 

19 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Departmental Elective 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* 
or 

Free Electives 6 

MAE 401 Energy Conversion 3 

MAE 405 Mechanical Engineering 

Laboratory III 1 

MAE 415 Mechanical Engineering 

Analysis 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

Departmental Elective 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* 
or 

Free Electives 6 

MAE 402 Heat and Mass Transfer 3 

MAE 416 Mechanical Engineering 

Design 4 

16 

Total Hours for Graduation 126 



Students may elect to take PY 201, 202 and 203 in place of PY 205, 208. Rearrange- 
ment of the schedule of courses to accomplish this will be worked out in consultation 
with the student's adviser. 



*See pages 145-147 for information concerning the humanities, social science sequence. 



AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering 

Mechanics 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* 
or 

Free Elective 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

EM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

Humanities, Social Sciences* 
or 

Free Elective 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations ... 3 
MAE 250 Introduction to Aerospace 

Engineering 3 

Physical Education 1 

15 



171 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EE 201 Electric Circuits I 4 EE 332 Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

or EE 333 Principles of Electrical 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical Engineering Laboratory 1 

Engineering 3 Humanities, Social Sciences* 

and or 

EE 339 Principles of Electrical Free Elective 3 

Engineering Laboratory 1 MAE 356 Aerodynamics II 4 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I . 3 MAE 365 Air-Breathing Propulsion 

MAE 355 Aerodynamics I 4 Systems 4 

MAE 361 Aerospace Vehicle Performance . 3 MAE 3?1 Aerospace Vehicle Structures I . . 3 

MAT 201 Structures & Properties of — 

Engineering Materials I 3 jg 

17 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities, Social Sciences* Departmental Elective 3 

or Humanities, Social Sciences* 

Free Electives 6 or 

MAE 462 Flight Vehicle Stability Free Electives 9 

and Control 3 MAE 479 Aerospace Vehicle Design 4 

MAE 467 Rocket Propulsion 3 — 

MAE 472 Aerospace Vehicle Structures II . 4 16 

16 Total Hours for Graduation 129 

* See pages 145-147 for information concerning the humanities, or social science sequence. 

PROFESSIONAL STUDY 

A fifth or professional year of study is offered in mechanical engineering for 
graduates who desire- to return to the University for a program of concentrated 
study in a selected area. This program is intended primarily for practitioners and is, 
in no sense, a graduate program leading to the usual advanced degrees. The degree 
of Mechanical Engineer is conferred upon graduates of the fifth-year program. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offers the Master of 
Mechanical Engineering degree, the Master of Science degree and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School 
Catalog. 



NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Burlington Engineering Laboratories 

Professor R. L. Murray, Head of the Department 

Professors: J. R. Beeler, T. S. Elleman, R. P. Gardner, R. F. Saxe, L. R. Zum- 
walt; Associate Professors: J. R. Bohannon Jr., C. E. Siewert, K. Verghese; 
Assistant Professor: E. Stam; Extension Specialist: J. Kohl; Health Physicist: 
D. W. Morgan Jr.; Reactor Engineers: J. T. Beard, F. J. Steinkruger 

The field of nuclear engineering is concerned with the engineering aspects of 
the control, release and utilization of nuclear energy. Nuclear reactors serve many 
functions: as heat sources for economical electric power plants, as the basis of 
modern propulsion systems for ships and submarines, as producers of fissionable 
and radioactive isotopes for a variety of peaceful applications. Nuclear devices 



172 



supply auxiliary power and propulsion energy for space vehicles in operation and 
under development. The purpose of the nuclear engineering program is to educate 
the individual in those scientific and engineering principles essential for effective 
and productive contributions in industrial, university and governmental service. 

CURRICULUM 

Nuclear engineers have the opportunity to work in the areas of nuclear systems 
research, design, development, testing, operation, environmental protection and 
marketing. The Bachelor of Science degree program is designed to prepare gradu- 
ates for positions in industry or government laboratories or for graduate study in 
the field. The curriculum incorporates basic sciences and engineering, with special 
emphasis on mathematics and physics, followed by coursework in nuclear science 
and technology. Attention is given to the engineering design of nuclear reactors 
and nuclear radiation systems and to energy resources and environmental aspects of 
nuclear energy. 

FACILITIES 

Facilities available on campus for nuclear education at the undergraduate level 
as well as at the graduate level include: heterogeneous enriched uranium reactor, 
10 kilowatt, with beam ports, a fast sample transport system, thermal column, and 
irradiation volume; Cobalt-60 gamma source, 40,000 curies; multichannel analyzers 
for gamma ray analysis; solid state detectors; Van de Graaff positive ion ac- 
celerator with pulsed source; digital computer, IBM System/370, Model 165, analog 
computer; radiation detection and control laboratory; activation analysis labora- 
tory; and high- and low-level radiochemistry laboratories. 

A one-megawatt "PULSTAR" reactor is available for teaching laboratories, 
research, radiation services and special training programs. This new heterogeneous 
enriched uranium reactor provides high steady state fluxes and 2200 MW pulses. 
The reactor facility includes a thermal column, a bulk irradiation facility, sample 
irradiation tubes and pneumatic tubes. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Although the nuclear industry is relatively young, it already represents a major 
national effort. Reactor development and construction has proceeded at a remark- 
able pace and will continue to grow as we become increasingly reliant upon nuclear 
energy as a substitute for energy from fossil fuels. Industrial applications of 
radiation will accelerate as the economic potential of such methods becomes even 
more firmly established. There continues to be a substantial need for nuclear 
engineers, especially by electric utilities, reactor manufacturers and regulatory 
agencies. Prospects for the future are promising. 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

For the freshman year see page 148. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 EM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

Calculus III 4 NE 201 Applications of Nuclear Energy ... 3 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of PY 203 General Physics 4 

Engineering Materials I 3 Physical Education 1 

PY 202 General Physics 4 — 

Physical Education 1 17 

17 

173 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical EE332 Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 Engineering 3 

EM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermo- MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II . 3 

dynamics I 3 MAE 303 Engineering Thermo- 

PY 410 Nuclear Physics I 4 dynamics III 3 

Free Elective 3 NE 302 Fundamentals of Nuclear 

— Engineering 4 

16 — 

16 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 Advised Nuclear Engineering Electives 6 

NE 401 Reactor Analysis and Design 4 Humanities and Social Sciences* 3 

NE 402 Reactor Engineering 4 NE 403 Nuclear Engineering 

Advised Technical Elective 3 Design Projects 2 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

17 14 
Total Hours for Graduation 129 



* Humanities and social sciences sequence to be taken according to standard pattern for School of 
Engineering. 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING 

The School of Engineering offers professional curricula leading to the degrees 
Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Industrial Engineer, 
Materials Engineer, Mechanical Engineer and Nuclear Engineer. A program of 
study is tailor-made to fit the particular needs of each student to help him prepare 
for a professional career in engineering. 

It is the intent of the program to emphasize professional course work rather than 
research. The curriculum consists of a minimum of 30 credits of course work making 
up a planned program designed to fit the student's objective. Samples of typical 
programs may be found under the appropriate departmental curricula. 

ADMISSION 

Applicants who hold the bachelor's degree in engineering from recognized col- 
leges will be admitted to the professional program of the School of Engineering 
upon presentation of official credentials. For unconditional admission, these 
credentials must show the completion, with a minimum grade-point average of 2.5 
(C + ), of an amount of undergraduate work in the proposed field of professional 
study corresponding to that normally required for a bachelor's degree in that field. 

Admission on a provisional basis may be granted applicants who do not meet 
the formal requirements. In case of insufficient preparation, prerequisite courses 
will be prescribed in addition to the normal program requirements. 

Application should be filed in the office of the dean of the School of Engineering 
at least 30 days in advance of the semester in which admission is sought. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The following regulations of the School of Engineering will be observed: 

1. An undergraduate enrolled at North Carolina State University who plans to 

174 



undertake a professional program and who has fulfilled all requirements for the 
bachelor's degree except for a few courses, may be permitted to enroll in courses for 
credit toward the professional degree provided the student has {riven notice of his 
purpose to the dean of the School of Engineering. 

2. A limited amount of credit to be applied toward the requirements for the 
professional degree may be transferred to North Carolina State University from 
recognized institutions of university grade offering advanced work in engineering 
and related fields. Such a transfer of credit must be recommended by the head of 
the department in which the student does his major work and approved by the dean 
of the School of Engineering. 

3. Professional students are classified as post-baccalaureate students and are 
subject to rules and regulations as established and administered by the dean of the 
School of Engineering. 

4. Grades for such completed courses are reported to the dean of the School of 
Engineering and to the Office of Registration. A minimum grade of "C" must be 
made in each course to obtain credit. A quality point average of 2.5 (C + ) in all 
course work must be attained to satisfy requirements for a professional degree. 

5. Work completed more than six years prior to the date on which the profes- 
sional degree is to be granted may not be used as credit toward the professional 
degree, unless approved by the head of the department concerned and the dean of 
the School of Engineering. 

6. Each professional student will be assigned an adviser in the area of work in 
which he is majoring. The function of the adviser is to assist the student in pre- 
paring a program of study and to counsel him in his academic work. The student 
will be required, with the assistance of his adviser, to prepare a complete plan of 
study before the end of his first semester in residence. This program of study is 
subject to the approval of the dean of the School of Engineering. 



ENGINEERING RESEARCH SERVICES DIVISION 

Burlington Laboratories Building 

Research Professor R. F. Stoops, Acting Head 

Assistant Director: B. M. Gay; Research Professors: H. Palmour III, H. H. Sta- 
delmaier; Research Associate Professor: Frances M. Richardson; Assistant 
Professor: R. F. Davis; Research Associates: K. R. Brose, A. E. Lucier; 
Research Assistants: Maria L. Fiedler, L. T. Jordan, G. S. Sheffield 

The Engineering Research Services Division is operated within the School of 
Engineering as a special administrative unit for the following purposes: (1) to offer 
to industry engineering services devoted to the solution of technical problems, (2) 
to develop new or improved products and processes that will provide wider utiliza- 
tion of the natural resources of the State, (3) to provide research support services 
for the academic departments, and (4) to administer the research, training, and 
equipment grants and contracts of the School of Engineering. To accomplish these 
objectives Engineering Research Services Division has an administrative section, 
a metallurgical research section, a ceramic engineering research section, a pyro- 
chemical research section and 11 specialized service facilities. The latter provide 
special services such as electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, X-ray 
diffraction and fluorescent analyses, thermoanalytic analysis, precision machine 
shop work, electronic equipment repairs, mechanical testing, etc. The Division's 
research activities, particularly those involving metals and ceramics, have received 
national and international recognition. Much needed engineering services have 
been provided to existing industries, and such services provided by the Division 
have led to the establishment of new industries in North Carolina. 

The School of Engineering's research contracts and grants administered by the 



175 



Division had a value of $2,087,000 during the 1971-72 fiscal year. This research 
resulted in 225 scientific and technical publications. 



INDUSTRIAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Riddick Building and Daniels Hall 

J. R. Canada, Assistant Dean of Engineering for Extension 

Supervisor of Industrial Extension Education: J. R. Hart; Supervisor of Area 
Services: T. W. Stephenson; Supervisor of Information Services: E. L. Briggs 
Jr.; Engineering Extension Coordinator: C. S. Cooper; Media Training Co- 
ordinator: J. E. Kimbrell; Project Director: N. B. Angel; Departmental 
Extension Specialists: R. F. DeBruhl (Civil Engineering), H. M. Eckerlin 
(Engineering Mechanics), E. L. Clark (Industrial Engineering), A. S. Boyers 
(Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering), J. Kohl (Nuclear Engineering); 
Field Representatives: W. W. Erwin, D. E. Harrell, M. R. Sparks, J. B. 
Travis; Industrial Specialist: S. D. Coward, F. L. Eargle; Extension Training 
Specialist: R. G. Smith; Marine Engineering Extension Specialist: A. G. 
Chleborowicz; Plastics Engineering Extension Specialist: H. H. Haaxma 

The Industrial Extension Service is the organization designated by the School of 
Engineering to provide educational, information, referral and technical assistance 
services to the industrial community in the State. It provides extension education 
and field services in direct response to expressed industrial needs. 

EXTENSION EDUCATION 

The objective of this program is to serve the needs of North Carolina's industry 
for continuing education through the offering of short courses and conferences, 
supervisory development workshops, correspondence and evening courses for credit 
and educational television courses. Also, technical bulletins, directories and pack- 
aged in-plant training course materials are prepared and distributed. 

FIELD SERVICES 

The objectives of the Field Services Program are to determine the needs and 
interests of North Carolina's industry and to provide appropriate liaison, referral, 
informational and technical assistance services. This includes training and technical 
assistance to small industry, the maintenance and operation of a film leading 
library, and the maintenance and operation of a lending library of programmed 
instruction material. 



MINERALS RESEARCH LABORATORY 

180 Coxe Avenue 

Asheville, North Carolina 

W. T. McDaniel Jr., Chief Engineer 

Ore Dressing Engineer: I. H. Redeker; Mineral Dressing Engineers: E. H. 
Bentzen III, R. D. Kauffman, R. M. Lewis; Ore Dressing Specialist: J. P. 
Neal; Chemical Engineer: P. N. Sales 

The Minerals Research Laboratory is operated by the School of Engineering. 
The primary objectives of the laboratory are: (1) to supply technical assistance to 
mineral producers of North Carolina through research and development, (2) to aid 



176 



in establishing new industries in the State, and (3) to develop, conserve and enhance 
the value of the mineral resources of North Carolina. Since it was established by 
the General Assembly in 1946, the laboratory has made important contributions 
toward the above objectives. An estimated $100,000,000 has been invested in plants 
in the State using processes developed at the laboratory. 

The principal efforts of the laboratory are in the area of mineral recovery, and in 
recent years emphasis has been on recovery of valuable minerals from wastes. For 
example, successful waste utilization programs for the mica and feldspar industries 
have improved the competitive position of these companies, have reduced pollution 
and have resulted in conservation of the State's mineral resources. Improved 
beneficiation methods are being developed for mica, feldspar, phosphate, olivine, 
chromite, kyanite, limestone, clay, pyrophyllite, talc and ilmenite. 

The facilities of the laboratory include the latest equipment for separation and 
improving the quality of minerals. Materials may be processed in the laboratory in 
small batches or on a full pilot-plant scale. 



177 



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(I 



FOREST RESOURCES 



Biltmore Hall 

Eric L. Ellwood, Dean 

L. C. Saylor, Assistant Dean 

The management and utilization of the resources and products associated with the 
forests of the South provide many opportunities for challenging professional careers. 
Our forests provide a variety of goods such as timber, water, wildlife and recreation 
environments that are vital to the economy and well being of North Carolina. 
Students graduating from one of the School's programs are qualified for professional 
positions managing forest lands, or producing the products or managing the services 
developed from these lands. The principal thrust of the programs is in the area of 
natural renewable resource management. The management of forest lands and the 
wise use of the products and amenities that can be derived from them is central to 
preserving the quality of the environment and the quality of life for society. 

North Carolina is one of the nation's most important forest states. Its 20 million 
acres of commercial forest land, which comprises two-thirds of the land area of the 
State, form the base for goods and services valued at approximately five billion 
dollars annually. Nearly 20 percent of the state's industrial labor force is associated 
with forest based organizations. 

The South, appropriately named the "wood basket" of the United States, contains 
forests that support the region's largest industry. New wood-using industries con- 
tinue to move into the South on an unprecedented scale, creating multi-billion dollar 
outputs for the region. In a similar manner, recreational activities continue to 
expand at explosive rates as a result of growing population, affluence, mobility and 
leisure time; this also has developed into a multi-billion dollar industry. 

As a result of this growth, the forest based industries, together with a variety of 
governmental agencies, need a large number of well-educated, technically competent 
personnel. 

Many of the programs in the School of Forest Resources are not duplicated in 
other southern universities and for this reason the Trustees of the University and 
the Southern Regional Education Board have designated certain of the School's 
programs as regional in nature. As a result no limit is set to enrollments of qualified 
out-of-state students. 

DEGREES 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon the satisfactory completion of 
any of the four-year undergraduate curricula listed below. 

Graduate degrees offered in the School include: Master of Science, Master of 
Forestry, Master of Recreation Resources, Master of Wood and Paper Science and 
the Doctor of Philosophy. Interested applicants should consult the Graduate School 
Catalog for additional information. 

CURRICULA 

Six curricula are administered in the School through its Departments of Forestry, 
Recreation Resources Administration and Wood and Paper Science. These pro- 
gi-ams, which provide a broad education in the biological and physical sciences as 
well as a sound cultural background, prepare students for careers in the professional 
fields of conservation, forestry, natural resource recreation management, recreation 
and park administration, pulp and paper science and technology, and wood science 
and technology. 

Freshmen enrolling in the School have a nearly common core of courses during 
the first semester. This allows deferment of the final selection of a curriculum for 
two or three semesters without penalty. An introductory course given during the 

179 



first semester describes all curricula within the School and the career opportunities 
related to each. 

FIELD INSTRUCTION AND EXPERIENCE 

All students (except those in conservation) are required to present an equivalent 
of one summer of acceptable work experience in order to meet graduation require- 
ments. Students are required to consult with their advisers as to what constitutes 
acceptable employment. 

The sophomore summer camp is a requirement for students in forestry. This camp 
follows the sophomore year for resident students. Transfer students attend the camp 
after completing the junior year at North Carolina State University. 

Wood science and technology students are required to attend a summer practicum 
following the sophomore year; transfer students attend following the junior year. 

Additional field instruction and scheduled trips to representative industries and 
agencies are required frequently as a part of regular class assignments. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Students making exceptional academic records during their freshman year may, 
with the approval of the faculty, elect to follow an honors program. Students enrolled 
in the program develop more rigorous programs of study, frequently taking advanced 
courses in such areas as mathematics, chemistry, statistics and economics. With the 
consent of their adviser, honors students may substitute preferred courses for 
normally required courses in order to develop programs of strength in special areas 
of interest. During the junior and senior years, honors students are encouraged to 
undertake a special program of independent study which can involve a research 
problem. 

EXTENSION 

The Forestry Extension Program, a part of the Agricultural Extension Service, 
is the largest program of its type in the United States. It serves landowners, 
industries and public agencies in the areas of forestry, recreation, wildlife and wood 
and paper. Primary responsibility for the extension service is promoting the appli- 
cation of new ideas developed through research and experience. 

In cooperation with the General Extension Division, short courses are offered in a 
number of fields to provide men in industry and government an opportunity to keep 
abreast of modern developments in techniques and equipment. 

FACILITIES AND LABORATORIES 

The School of Forest Resources is housed in three modernly equipped facilities 
on the southwest side of the campus. In addition, the School has five research and 
demonstration forests containing more than 80,000 acres that provide excellent 
opportunities for field instruction. 

Biltmore Hall — This $1,700,000 facility is the most recent addition to the School 
complex. It contains general classrooms, laboratories, administrative and faculty 
offices and a library. 

Hodges Wood Products Laboratory — One of the largest and most completely 
equipped laboratories for the conduct of training and research in wood technology, 
this structure houses machining, gluing, finishing, preserving, testing and research 
laboratories, as well as a sawmill, dry kiln and veneer lathe. 

Robertson Laboratory of Pulp and Paper — Unique to the South, this wing of 
Biltmore Hall contains wood preparation, chemistry, pulping, testing and coloring 
laboratories as well as digesters and a small paper machine. 

School Forests — The Hofmann forest on the coastal plain and the Hill, Schenck, 
Hope Valley and Goodwin forests in the Piedmont provide a wide variety of forest 
types. The permanent Slocum summer camp for sophomores in forestry is located on 
the Hill Forest, Durham County. 

180 



CONSERVATION 

(Also see agriculture and life sciences.) 
M. G. Cook, Major Adviser, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
L. C. Saylor, Major Adviser, School of Forest Resources 

Conservation is wise use, perpetuation, or improvement of natural resources — 
without waste — for the long-term benefit of society. Rapid urbanization and indus- 
trialization, plus an increase in population, are bringing increased pressures on the 
use of land areas for food and fiber, for wood and water and for recreation. These 
trends have created an acute need for people educated to make sound judgments in 
the management and use of natural resources. 

The School of Forest Resources and the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, 
with strong programs in forestry, recreation, wood and paper science, ecology, soils, 
wildlife and the basic biological sciences, have jointly developed a baccalaureate 
program in conservation designed to educate individuals who are needed to meet 
the present day challenges in natural resource management. Although conservation 
has been correctly termed a philosophy rather than a discipline, resource managers 
must be well trained in the basic concepts of several disciplines in order to apply 
this philosophy to problem-solving in a modern society. 

CURRICULUM 

Depending on their interests, students can enroll in various departments in either 
the School of Forest Resources or the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. All 
programs in conservation have a certain number of core courses in common; 
specialty areas or minors are developed through the use of elective courses. 

The program in conservation provides a general education of breadth in natural 
resource management rather than emphasizing technological aspects. Students 
desiring an education with more professional emphasis frequently combine the 
conservation program with a second degree. By the proper choice of electives, it is 
possible for students to obtain a dual degree by meeting the basic degree require- 
ments in fields such as botany, forestry, liberal arts, recreation, soil science, wildlife 
management and zoology, as well as in conservation. 

CONSERVATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ALS 103 Orientation CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

or ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

FOR 101 (WPS 101) Introduction to Humanity — Social Science Elective 3 

Forest Resources 1 MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A . . 4 

BO 200 Plant Life Physical Education 1 

or — 

BS 100 General Biology 4 15 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Humanity — Social Science Elective 3 

MA 111 Algebra & Trigonometry 4 

Physical Education 1 

16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 BO 200 Plant Life 

GY 120 Physical Geology 3 or 

Humanity — Social Science Elective 3 ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural English Elective 3 

Resources 3 Humanity — Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 SSC 200 Soils 4 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 15 

181 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Biological Science Elective 3 

Ecology 4 Conservation Elective 3 

Conservation Elective 4 Humanity — Social Science Elective 3 

RRA 241 Recreation Resource PY 221 College Physics 5 

Relationships 3 FOR 472 Renewable Resource 

Humanity — Social Science Elective 3 Management 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

17 



17 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Biological Science Elective 3 Biological Science Elective 3 

Conservation Elective 3 Conservation Elective 3 

English Elective 3 Humanity — Social Science Elective 3 

ZO 353 Wildlife Management 3 Free Electives 6 

Free Electives 4 — 

— 15 

16 Total Hours for Graduation 128 



See agriculture and life sciences pages 66-70 for a summary of required and elective courses. 

FORESTRY 

Biltmore Hall 

Professor C. B. Davey, Head of Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: F. S. Barkalow, Jr., R. C. Bryant, A. W. Cooper, E. B. Cowling, J. W. 
Duffield, M. H. Farrier, J. W. Hardin, C. S. Hodges, Jr. (USFS), J. O. Lammi, 
T. E. Maki, G. Namkoong (USFS), T. O. Perry, L. C. Saylor, R. R. Wilkinson, 
B. J. Zobel; Adjunct Professors: G. H. Hepting, N. E. Johnson, L. J. Metz; 
Professors Emeriti: W. D. Miller, R. J. Preston; Associate Professors: L. F. 
Grand, W. L. Hafley, B. F. Swindel (USFS), A. G. Wollum II; Adjunct 
Associate Professors: J. W. Koenigs, E. G. Kuhlman, C. G. Wells, Assistant 
Professors: R. C. Kellison, D. H. J. Steensen; Adjunct Assistant Professors: 
R. L. Blair, H. T. Schreuder; Instructor: A. G. Mullin; Liaison Geneticist: R. J. 
Weir; Teaching Technician: T. V. Gemmer; Research Associates: L. W. Haines, 
L. G. Jervis; Research Assistants: J. B. Jett Jr., W. D. Pepper (USFS), J. R. 

S PRAGUE 

EXTENSION 

Professor W. M. Keller, In Charge of Forest Resources Extension 

Professor: J. C. Jones; Associate Professors: W. T. HuxSTER, Leader, Forestry 
Section, E. M. Jones, F. E. Whitfield; Assistant Professors: R. S. Douglass, 
W. M. Stanton; Instructor: A. J. Weber; Specialist: L. H. Harkins 

CURRICULUM 

The forestry curriculum lays the foundation for a general education and provides 
training in management of forest land resources. This curriculum requires knowl- 
edge of basic surveying and use of aerial photographs to prepare maps and to plan 
forest road locations; knowledge of biology to identify plants and animals and to 
control their growth and reproduction; knowledge of mathematics and biometry to 
sample and estimate timber and other resources of the forest; and knowledge of 
economics and business management to evaluate and handle forest properties as 
business enterprises. 

182 



The forestry curriculum is broad, but emphasizes a solid background in chemistry, 
physics, mathematics, biology, humanities and social science. It provides a core of 
general forestry, part of this core being a 10-week camp program in the summer 
immediately following the sophomore academic year. The camp is conducted in the 
Piedmont and the mountains of North Carolina. In the junior and senior years, 
there are courses dealing directly with the growing of forests, the management of 
forest lands and the economic use of the resources of the forest. At the end of the 
sophomore year, or the beginning of the junior year, the student chooses one of 
several areas of specialization and selects appropriate courses to satisfy the credit- 
hour requirements for that option. Thirty-four credits are provided for the option 
and free electives. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates are in demand by state and federal land-managing agencies, by 
industrial concerns growing wood as a raw material, and by other organizations 
and agencies such as the agricultural extension service. Many graduates, after 
acquiring professional forestry experience, are self-employed as consultants and as 
operators or owners of forest-related businesses. 

FORESTRY CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 CH 103 General Chemistry II** 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I* 4 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 FOR 210 Dendrology-Gymnosperms 2 

FOR 101 (WPS 101) Introduction to Humanity — Social Science Elective*** 3 

Forest Resources 1 MA 212 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B . . 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A* . 4 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

17 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 EC 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

FOR 211 Dendrology- Angiosperms 2 FOR 272 Forest Mensuration 3 

SSC 200 Soils 4 PY 221 College Physics 5 

WPS 202 Wood Structure & Properties I . . 3 Free Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 — 

— 15 

16 

SUMMER CAMP 

Credits 

FOR 204 Silviculture 2 

FOR 263 Dendrology 1 

FOR 264 Forest Protection 2 

FOR 274 Mapping & Mensuration 4 

FOR 284 Utilization 1 

10 

All students select an option by the beginning of the junior year at the latest. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENT 301 Introduction to Forest Insects ... 3 FOR 452 Silvics 4 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 Humanity — Social Sciences Electives*** .... 6 

FOR 219 (WPS 219) Forest Economy Option Requirements 3 

Its Operation 3 PP 318 (FOR 318) Forest Pathology 4 

Humanity — Social Science Elective*** 3 — 

Option Requirements 4 17 

16 

183 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

FOR 405 Forest Land Management 5 FOR 406 Forest Land Inventory 

Option Requirements 8 and Planning 6 

Free Electives*** 3 Option Requirements 10 

16 16 

Total Hours for Graduation 139 



•The freshman year course offerings as shown here assume that entrance test scores suggest 
readiness for MA 112 and CH 101. Appropriate substitutions will be made when test scores 
indicate the need to start at a different level. 
♦♦Students planning to take full-year courses in advanced chemistry will take CH 107 in place of 
CH 103. 
♦♦♦Electives must include at least 12 credits in humanities or social science; nine credits are 
completely free of restriction. 

FORESTRY FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION 

The fields of specialization (options) in forestry include (a) general forestry, 
(b) business operations, (c) forest biometry, (d) watershed management, (e) forest 
biology, (f) wildlife management, (g) harvesting operations, (h) recreation, (i) 
conservation and (j) wood technology. 

A student selects one of the above fields and schedules the approved courses in 
that specialization. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Programs have been arranged with the Departments of Economics, Entomology, 
Recreation Resources Administration, Soil Science, and Zoology, whereby interested 
students can obtain, in addition to the Bachelor of Science degree in forestry, a 
second Bachelor of Science degree in agricultural economics, conservation, entomol- 
ogy, natural resource recreation management, soil science or wildlife management. 
These joint programs usually require some additional credits above the option and 
free elective credits in the forestry curriculum. Superior students can carry these 
additional credits in the regular four-year program and average students usually 
can qualify for both degrees by enrolling for an extra semester or equivalent summer 
sessions. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

An honors program is available for students with outstanding records, who may, 
with the approval of the faculty, substitute a program of advanced studies in lieu 
of option requirements and certain core courses. 



RECREATION RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION 

Biltmore Hall 

Professor Thomas I. Hines, Head of the Department 

Professor: W. E. Smith; Associate Professors: G. A. Hammon, L. L. Miller, R. E. 
Sternloff, C. C. Stott, M. R. Warren Jr.; Adjunct Associate Professor: J. S. 
Stevens Jr.; Adjunct Assistant Professors: J. H. Brendle Jr., J. H. Moses; 
Instructor: H. K. Cordell 

Standards that have been adopted by the recreation profession make college 
graduation a requirement for professional employment in the expanding fields of 
recreation. It is vitally important for the high school graduate who is planning to 
enter the recreation profession to select wisely a college or university — one that 
has facilities, staff, curriculum, program and an established reputation for compre- 
hensive professional education in recreation and parks education. 

184 



The curricula of the Department of Recreation Resources Administration offer a 
broad general education background, basic professional and technical courses, and 
the opportunity for a student to specialize in a particular field of recreation. Two 
curricula are available: recreation and park administration and natural resource 
recreation management. 

RECREATION AND PARK ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Thomas I. Hinks, In Charge 

CURRICULUM 

The curriculum of recreation and park administration is designed to fulfill the 
needs of the graduate who will be employed by municipalities, governmental 
agencies, private agencies, industry and business and other private groups. The 
general education requirements include courses in biology, psychology, history and 
government, English, mathematics, chemistry and economics. Courses of a more 
specialized nature consist of accounting, statistics, research methods, landscape 
gardening and design. Professional courses, applying directly to the needs of the 
recreator and his profession, cover such topics as recreation philosophy, manage- 
ment techniques and skills, fiscal operation, supervision, site planning, program- 
ming, administration, etc. 

To provide a student with the opportunity to study the application of recreation 
to a particular environment, the following options are available: 

Employee Option — A background in economics, personnel management and indus- 
trial psychology is necessary. 

Municipal Parks — Additional courses in applied biology, municipal government 
and community organization are required. 

Institutional — Youth service agencies, corrective institutions and private 
agencies require that a graduate have emphasis in sociology and psychology. 

Public — To satisfy the needs of students planning to be employed by municipal- 
ities or counties, additional courses are required in government, community 
organization and leadership. 

RECREATION AND PARK ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BS 100 General Biology 4 EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

FOR 101 Introduction to Forest Resources . 1 SOC 202 Principle of Sociology 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A or BO 200 Plant Life or 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance & ZO 201 Animal Life 4 

Elementary Statistics 4 Physical Education 1 

RRA 152 Introduction to Recreation 3 Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 

— 17 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

RRA 215 Maintenance & Operations I .... 3 CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry 5 

RRA 241 Recreation Resource FOR 273 (WPS 273) Quantitative 

Relationships 3 Methods of Forest Resources 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 Physical Science Elective 3 

Speech Elective 3 RRA 216 Maintenance & Operations II .... 3 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Social Science— Humanity Elective 3 

Resources 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

— IS 
16 



185 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 3 EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

LAR 211 Introduction to Landscape Financial Reporting 3 

Architecture 3 RRA 359 Recreation & Park Supervision . . 3 

RRA 358 Recreation Program 4 ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 Option Elective 3 

Sociology Elective ' 3 Elective 3 

16 15 

SUMMER SESSION 
(9 weeks) 

RRA 475 Recreation and Park 

Internship 9 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to RRA 451 Facility & Site Planning 3 

Ecology 4 RRA 454 Recreation & Park Finance 3 

RRA 453 Administrative Policies & Option Elective 3 

Procedures 3 Elective 3 

SOC 416 Research Methods 3 Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Option Elective 3 — 

Elective 3 15 

— Total Hours for Graduation 138 

16 



NATURAL RESOURCE RECREATION MANAGEMENT 

Associate Professor G. A. Hammon, In Charge 

CURRICULUM 

A strong upward trend in natural resource-oriented recreation is evident 
throughout the nation. The demand is exceeding the supply in many localities under 
existing management conditions and constraints, while inadequately managed use 
in popular locations is contributing toward progressive and unacceptable deprecia- 
tion of the physical environment and of the recreation opportunities. 

Growing pressure on the diminishing resources base is placing a premium on 
managers who can i-ecognize opportunities, identify problems, conceptualize solu- 
tions and implement policies in this field. Specifically needed are highly motivated 
professionals with strong interdisciplinary backgrounds who are trained to under- 
stand the recreation wants and needs of people, and are competent to make sound 
judgments in planning and managing renewable natural resources for the optimum 
output of recreation benefits. 

It is the intent of this curriculum to provide professional competence in the field 
of natural resource recreation management for the student who expects to serve 
with organizations, institutions, agencies or corporations concerned with the 
preservation, wise use and improvement of recreation resources and opportunities 
as they occur in the general forest environment. Students will be better prepared 
to serve with public or private agencies primarily concerned with the more intensive 
phases of public outdoor recreation as they occur on extensive parklands and on 
other nonurban lands managed for the optimum output of diversified recreation 
opportunities. 



186 



NATURAL RESOURCE RECREATION MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



BS 100 General Biology 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

FOR 101 Introduction to Forest 

Resources 1 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A .. 4 

RRA 152 Introduction to Recreation 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B .. 3 
ZO 201 Animal Life or 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistiy I 4 

RRA 241 Recreation Resources 

Relationships 3 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural 

Resources* 3 

FOR 273 Quantitative Methods in 

Forest Resources 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Fall Semester 



RRA 440 Recreation Resources Inventory 

and Planning 3 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology . 4 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Controlled Elective 6 



16 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 

RRA 441 Recreation Resources Develop- 



ment 3 

BO 403 Systematic Botany or 

FOR 210 & 211 Dendrology** 4 

SSC 200 Soils 4 

Controlled Elective 3 

Elective 3 



17 



SUMMER SESSION 
RRA 475 Recreation & Park Internship 



Fall Semester 

Wildland Recreation Environ 



RRA 442 

ment 3 

Controlled Elective 6 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

RRA 454 Recreation & Park Finance 3 

Controlled Electives 6 

Electives 6 



Total Hours for Graduation 



15 

138 



15 



* Students of junior standing may elect FOR 472, Renewable Resource Management. 
** FOR 210 and 211 may not be taken in the same semester. 



WOOD AND PAPER SCIENCE 

Biltmore Hall 

Professor I. S. Goldstein, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: R. M. Carter, E. B. Cowling, E. L. Ellwood, C. A. Hart, R. G. 
Hitchings, R. J. Thomas; Adjunct Professor: W. R. Smith; Professor Emeritus: 



187 



A. J. Stamm; Associate Professors: J. S. Gratzl, M. P. Levi, W. T. McKean Jr., 
R. G. Pearson, R. H. Reeves, C. N. Rogers; Adjunct Associate Professors: 
K. P. Kringstad, R. K. Stevens; Associate Professor Emeritus: C. G. Landes; 
Assistant Professors: Hou-MlN Chang, R. C. Gilmore, D. L. Holley Jr., M. W. 
Kelly D. H. J. Steensen; Assistant Professor Emeritus: H. D. COOK; In- 
structor: A. G. Mullin; Teaching Technician: T. Gemmer; Associate Mem- 
bers of the Faculty: V. T. Stannett (Chemical Engineering), A. Prak (In- 
dustrial Engineering) 

EXTENSION 

Professor: A. C. Barefoot Jr., Leader, Wood Products Section; Associate Pro- 
fessor: M. P. Levi; Associate Professor Emeritus: L. H. Hobbs; Assistant 
Professor: F. J. Hill; Instructors: E. L. Dkal Jr., S. J. Hanovkr 

The wood industries have been a vital part of the economy of North Carolina for 
over 300 years. North Carolina ranks first in the nation in the manufacture of 
hardwood, plywood and wooden furniture, first in the South in rough lumber and 
railroad tie production and among the leaders in the manufacture of pulp and 
paper. The value of forest products produced annually in the state exceeds three 
billion dollars. Seventeen percent of the state's labor force is employed in the wood 
industries. 

The Department of Wood and Paper Science offers two curricula — wood science 
and technology and pulp and paper science and technology — to educate persons 
for careers in the wood based and allied industries or in government agencies 
concerned with wood resources. The program in wood science and technology is 
concerned with the technical aspects of wood and its processing into reconstituted 
and manufactured products. The pulp and paper science and technology program 
deals specifically with wood fibers and their processing for paper and wood 
based chemicals. 



PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Robertson Laboratory 

Professor R. G. Hitchings, In Charge 

The curriculum in pulp and paper prepares people for technical work in the 
rapidly growing pulp and paper industry. Graduates find challenging careers as 
process engineers, product development engineers, technical service engineers, 
quality control supervisors, control chemists and production supervisors. After a 
thorough background in the basic sciences, the program offers laboratory work in 
the specialized Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory in wood pulp processes, 
chemical and by-products recovery, pulp bleaching, and in the various papermaking 
operations, such as refining, sizing, filling, dyeing, formation, coating and the 
converting of paper. 

The pulp and paper industry ranks fifth among all American industries. Pulp 
and paper products are valued at over $20 billion annually, and the industry 
provides work for about 700,000 employees. This is primarily a southern industry 
with over 60 percent of the nation's pulpwood produced in the South. 

Financially supported by more than 90 company members of the Pulp and 
Paper Foundation, this program in pulp and paper was created to meet the 
critical need for trained persons in the South. It is a regional program and has 
been approved by the Southern Regional Education Board as the undergraduate 
program to serve the Southeast in this field. Approximately 50 undergraduate 
scholarships are granted annually to students pursuing this field of study. The 
Reuben B. Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory provides this program with 
outstanding and unique facilities. 

All students majoring in this curriculum are required to spend at least one 
summer working in a pulp or paper mill where arrangements have been made by 

188 



the University for such employment. One hour of academic credit is granted the 
student after completion of 12 weeks of mill work and presentation of a 
satisfactory report covering this work experience. In addition to this minimum 
summer work requirement, students are urged to work in mills the two remaining 
summers between academic years because of the great value of practical experience 
in this industry. 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in pulp and paper 
science and technology. Three options are available enabling the student to orient 
his program to emphasize the technological, engineering or scientific aspects of 
pulping and papermaking. The technology option provides a broad background for 
those students anticipating careers in mill operations or with paper industry 
supplier organizations. Greater depth in the underlying scientific principles or their 
applications can be obtained from the science and engineering options, which also 
provide a good foundation for graduate study. A fifth year program leading to a 
second degree, i.e., a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, is available for 
interested students. 

PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 



TECHNOLOGY OPTION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A* . 4 
WPS 101 (FOR 101) Introduction to 

Forest Resources 1 

Social Science — Humanity Elective** 3 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

WPS 242 Fiber Analysis 3 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B* . 3 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

Physical Education 1 



16 



16 



Honors students take MA 102, 201 and 202 
Basic economics course recommended 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry . . 4 

PY 211 General Physics* 4 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for 

Engineers I 3 

Physical Education 1 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

PY 212 General Physics* 4 

WPS 273 Quantitative Methods in Forest 

Resources 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



18 



Honors students take PY 205, 208 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 331 Introduction to Physical Chemistry 4 
CHE 301 Elements of Chemical 

Engineering 3 

WPS 211 Pulp & Paper Internship 1 

WPS 321 Pulp and Paper Technology 3 

WPS 331 Introduction to Wood and Pulping 

Chemistry 1 

MAE 307 Energy Transformations 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

Engineering Elective* 3 

CHE 302 Elements of Chemical 

Engineering 3 

WPS 322 Pulp & Paper Technology 3 

WPS 332 Wood and Pulping Chemistry ... 4 
Free Elective 3 



16 



18 



EE 331 or 350 or IE 301 or CHE 225 



189 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

WPS 471 Pulping Process Analysis 3 

WPS 411 Pulp/Paper Unit Processes .... 3 
WPS 491 (FOR 491) Senior Problems in 

Forest Resources 1 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

WPS 413 Paper Properties & Additives ... 3 
Technical Elective 3 



L6 



Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 

WPS 412 Pulp/Paper Unit Processes 3 

WPS 463 Plant Inspections 1 

Social Science-Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Technical Elective 3 



16 



Total Hours for Graduation 131 



PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

SCIENCE OPTION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I . . 4 
WPS 101 (FOR 101) Introduction to 

Forest Resources 1 

Social Science — Humanity Elective* 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II . . 4 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

WPS 242 Fiber Analysis 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



*Basic economics course recommended 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 

CH 432 Physical Chemistry Laboratory .... 1 

WPS 211 Pulp and Paper Internship 1 

WPS 321 Pulp and Paper Technology 3 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for 

Engineers I 3 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

Free Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory . . 2 

WPS 322 Pulp and Paper Technology 3 

WPS 332 Wood & Pulping Chemistry 4 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Technical Elective 3 



18 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

WPS 471 Pulping Processes Analysis 3 

WPS 491 (FOR 491) Senior Problem 

in Forest Resources 1 

WPS 413 Paper Properties and 

Additives 3 

Social Science — Humanities Elective 6 

Technical Elective 3 



id 



Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 403 Paper Processes Analysis 3 

WPS 463 Plant Inspections 1 

Free Elective 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Technical Electives 6 



IB 



Total Hours for Graduation 132 



190 



PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING OPTION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 112H Composition and Reading* .... 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

WPS 101 (FOR 101) Introduction to 

Forest Resources 1 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I . . 4 

Social Science-Humanity Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry . 4 

WPS 242 Fiber Analysis 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II . 4 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Physical Education 1 



16 



16 



*If not qualified, take ENG 111 and 112. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III . 4 
CHE 205 Chemical Processes & Principles . 3 
Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education , 1 



is 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

WPS 211 Pulp & Paper Internship 1 

WPS 321 Pulp & Paper Technology 3 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 

CH 432 Physical Chemistry Laboratory .... 1 

CHE 311 Transport Processes I 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 322 Pulp and Paper Technology .... 3 
CHE 315 Chemical Process 

Thermodynamics 3 

CHE 327 Separation Processes 3 

WPS 332 Wood and Pulping Chemistry ... 4 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

WPS 471 Pulping Process Analysis 3 

WPS 411 Pulp/Paper Unit Processes 3 

WPS 491 (FOR 491) Senior Problem in 

Forest Resources 1 

WPS 413 Paper Properties and Additives . 3 
Social Science — Humanity Electives 6 



Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 

WPS 412 Pulp/Paper Unit Processes 3 

WPS 463 Plant Inspections 1 

Technical Elective 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



16 



Total Hours for Graduation 



16 
.131 



WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Professor R. M. Carter, In Charge 

Wood science and technology is an applied science of an inter-disciplinary nature 
which brings to bear the various disciplines of the natural sciences, mathematics, 
engineering and economics in an understanding of wood and its processing. It is a 
materials science, but also involves industrial manufacturing and management. The 
wood technologist's job is related to engineering; but, unlike the engineer, his 
educational exposure to wood science makes him particularly capable in applying 
his knowledge in such wood processes as machining, seasoning, gluing and finishing. 



191 



CURRICULUM 

The purpose of the curriculum is to instruct students in the nature of wood as a 
natural resource and its processing by means of a systematic study of the properties 
of wood and the processes involved in its utilization and manufacture. 

The curriculum has been designed to provide a high degree of flexibility to 
enable students to specialize in areas of their interests as they apply to the wood 
science and technology field. Following a sound coverage in mathematics and the 
natural sciences, a materials science approach to wood is developed concurrently 
with training in the processing technology of wood and wood based products and 
in decision making applied to wood product manufacturing. 

At the end of the sophomore year students attend a six-week wood process lab- 
oratory practicum in the Brandon P. Hodges Wood Products Laboratory. Following 
this laboratory students undertake an internship in industry or in institutional 
research to develop practical experience. 

During the final two years of the program students choose a minor, or option, 
in another discipline outside of the department. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The wood technologist possesses a broad background that includes scientific 
engineering and industrial knowledge together with specialist depth in the 
properties and behavior of wood. Today's modern wood manufacturing industries 
are increasingly seeking new techniques and materials. This rapid development 
has led to a demand for wood technologists with their combination of skills. 

Careers include industrial positions with companies manufacturing lumber, 
veneer, plywood, particle and fiber boards and consumer wood products such as 
furniture. Wood technologists are also in demand by suppliers to wood manufactur- 
ing industries, such as chemical and machinery companies. Additional policy 
making opportunities are available with state and federal governments in research, 
marketing or extension activities. 

Wood is a renewable biological resource requiring less energy for processing 
than other materials. Therefore, the wood technologist will have the opportunity 
to help improve the environment by developing cleaner processes, working with a 
renewable resource and creating policies governing environmental development. 



WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring^Semester Credits 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A* . 4 MA 212 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B* . 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

FOR 101 (WPS 101) Introduction to BS 100 General Biology or 

Forest Resources 1 BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

— 15 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EC 206 The Price System or Social Science— Humanity Elective 3 

EC 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 WPS 203 Wood Structure & 

PY 221 College Physics 5 Properties II 3 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 WPS 273 (FOR 273) Quantitative 

WPS 202 Wood Structure & Properties I . . 3 Methods in Forest Resources 3 

Physical Education 1 Option Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 Physical Education 1 

16 

192 



SUMMER PRACTICUM 

WPS 205 Wood Machining Practicum 

WPS 206 Wood Drying Practicum 

WPS 207 Gluing Practicum 

WPS 208 Wood Finishing Practicum . 

WPS 209 Plant Inspections 

WPS 210 Forest Products Internship . 



Credits 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for 

Engineers I 3 

WPS 301 Wood Processing I 3 

WPS 320 Wood Products Chemistry 3 

Option Elective 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

WPS 302 Wood Processing II 3 

WPS 344 Introduction to Quality Control . . 3 
WPS 491 (FOR 491) Senior Problems in 

Forest Resources 1 

Option Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



L6 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Social Science — Humanity Elective 3 

WPS 434 Wood Operations I 3 

WPS 441 Introduction to Wood Mechanics . 2 
WPS 492 (FOR 492) Senior Problems in 

Forest Resources 2 

Option Electives 5 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 435 (FOR 435) Systems Analysis in 

Forest Products 3 

WPS 442 Wood Mechanics & Design 3 

Option Electives 6 

Free Elective 3 



15 



Total Hours for Graduation 129 



Students with mathematical aptitude and interest are encouraged to substitute MA 102, MA 
201 and MA 202 for the mathematical sequence listed. 



FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION 

The program provides the opportunity for students to minor (option) in a dis- 
cipline outside of the department to the extent of a minimum of 20 credit hours. 
These options enable the student to develop a second area of concentration of his 
choice which can be applied to the field of wood science and technology and which 
can also provide a base for subsequent graduate work in wood science and technology 
or in the option area selected. Options are available in: a) economics, b) quantitative 
analysis, c) biology and biochemistry, d) chemistry, e) harvesting operations and 
f) political science. Options other than those listed may be arranged through the 
department. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

A dual degree program has been prepared jointly with the Department of 
Economics whereby interested students can obtain, in addition to a Bachelor of 
Science in wood science and technology, a second Bachelor of Science in economics. 

This program does require some additional credits beyond those required for the 
regular single degree program, but capable students can usually complete the 
necessary additional credits within the four years of the regular undergraduate 
program. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

An honors program is available for students with outstanding records, who may, 
with the approval of the faculty, substitute a program of advanced studies in 
lieu of option requirements and certain core courses. 



193 





££*& iZ£Z?.&r t " Pr °^ 8 - "^tunityfor stents to 



194 



LIBERAL ARTS 



R. 0. Tilman, Dean 

W. B. Toole III, Associate Dean 

The School of Liberal Arts offers programs of study which lead to the baccalaure- 
ate and advanced degrees in the disciplines comprising the humanities and social 
sciences and also offers courses in these areas which are part of the programs of all 
undergraduate students in the University. 

In making this work available to its students, the University provides an 
opportunity for its students to prepare for a full life in professions and occupations 
which require flexibility, broad knowledge and a basic comprehension of human 
beings and their problems. 

Eight departments are included in the School of Liberal Arts: economics (also 
a department in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences), English, history, 
modern languages, philosophy and religion, physical education, politics, and sociology 
and anthropology (also a department in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences). 
Areas of concentration (majors) on the undergraduate level are: economics, account- 
ing, business management, English, history, French, Spanish, philosophy, politics, 
sociology, speech-communications and multi-disciplinary studies. Degrees granted 
include the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, the Master of Arts and the 
Doctor of Philosophy, in addition to professional degrees in economics, politics and 
sociology. Teacher certification is available in the areas of English, speech- 
communications, French, Spanish, and social studies (history, economics, politics, 
sociology). 

In all undergraduate programs a minimum average of "C" in the major is 
required. In the Bachelor of Science program the student must maintain a "C" 
average both in his major and in his scientific or technical option. 

Students transferring from junior colleges are limited to 64 transfer credits plus 
physical education. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

A sample program of studies satisfying the requirements of the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts is set out below. Majors are available in economics, accounting, 
business management, English, history, French, Spanish, philosophy, politics, 
sociology, speech-communications and multi-disciplinary studies. It should be em- 
phasized that the program is illustrative only; with few exceptions the requirements 
can be satisfied in a variety of ways. In addition to the general University re- 
quirements, the student must present at least two units of a modern foreign 
language upon entrance. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS SAMPLE PROGRAM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

History* 3 History* 3 

Mathematics ** 3-4 Mathematics** 3-4 

Modern Language 201 (Intermediate) 3 Modern Language 202 (Intermediate) 3 

Social Science*** 3 Social Science *** 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16-17 16-17 



195 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Literature**** 3 Literature**** 3 

Natural Science***** 3-5 Natural Science***** 3-5 

PHI 205 Problems & Types of Philosophy . . 3 Social Science 3 

Social Science 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

16-18 



16-18 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Natural Science***** 3-5 Major 9 

Major 6 Electives 6 

Electives 6 — 

15 

15-17 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Major 9 Major 6 

Electives 6 Electives 9 

15 15 

Total Hours for Graduation 124 

* A two-semester program including a course concerned with pre-industrial Western or non- 
Western societies (HI 204, 207, 208, 209, 215, 216, 263, 264, 265 or 266), and another dealing 
with the United States or post-industrial Western societies (HI 205, 210, 233, 241, 242, 243, 244 or 
272). 
** Two semesters for social science majors (MA 111-112 required for economics; MA 111-112 
recommended for sociology and politics but MA 115-116 permitted). For all other Liberal Arts 
majors either two semesters (MA 115-116 or MA 111-112) or one semester plus a course in 
computer science, statistics, or logic (MA 115 or MA 111 and CSC 200, ST 311, or PHI 201). 
*** Twelve hours in at least two different social sciences, including a two-semester sequence (EC 
205-206; PS 200 or 201 plus any other politics course; SOC 202, ANT 252, or PSY 200 plus 
any other course in the same discipline). 
**** A two-semester sequence which surveys English or American literature (ENG 261-262 or 
ENG 265-266) or the literature of a modern foreign language (MLF 301-302; MLG 301-302; 
MLS 301-302; MLR 303-304). 
***** A three-semester program consisting of three courses from three of the following disciplines: 
physics, chemistry, biology, geology. Or an equivalent program with a two-semester 
sequence in biology (BS 100 or BS 105 plus another biological science), chemistry (CH 101-103) 
or physics (PY 211-212) and another course in a natural science other than the one in which the 
sequence is completed. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science features a double 
concentration: one in economics, English, history, philosophy, or politics; and 
another in a basic science, mathematics or technology. A "C" average must be 
attained in each. It will be to the advantage of the student to present at least four 
units of mathematics upon entrance. He must present at least two units of a modern 
foreign language. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I ... 4 

Modern Language 201 (Intermediate) 3 Modern Language 202 (Intermediate) 3 

Physical Education 1 PHI 205 Problems and Types of Philosophy . 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



is 



196 



Fall Semester 

ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 

History or Social Science 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II . 4 

PY 205 General Physics* 4 

or 
PY 211 General Physics* 

Physical Education 1 

15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 

History or Social Science 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 

PY 208 General Physics* 4 

or 
PY 212 General Physics* 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

15 



Fall Semester 

BS 100 General Biology 

History of Science*** 

Course I-Humanities or Social 

Science Concentration 
Course II-Humanities or Social 

Science Concentration 
Course I-Advanced Technical or 

Science Option 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

4 Philosophy of Science*** 3 

3 Course Ill-Humanities or Social 

Science Concentration 3 

3 Course IV-Humanities or Social 

Science Concentration 3 

3 Course II-Advanced Technical or 

Science Option 3-4 

3-4 Zoology or Botany 4 

16-17 16-17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Course V-Social Sciences or 

Humanities Concentration 3 

Course Ill-Advanced Technical or 

Science Option 3-4 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Seminar 3 

15-16 



Spring Semester Credits 

Course Vl-Social Sciences or 

Humanities Concentration 3 

Course IV- Advanced Technical or 

Science Option 3-4 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Elective 6 

Seminar 3 

18-19 
Total Hours for Graduation 126-133 



* May be switched with biology if further work in biology is anticipated. 
** MA 112, 114 and 212 may be substituted for MA 102, 201, 202. 
*** UNI 301-302; HI 321 or 322 plus PHI 405. 

JOINT LIBERAL ARTS-ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

Some students may want to take advantage of the opportunity to combine a 
Bachelor of Science in engineering with either a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor 
of Arts in liberal arts. When the two are carried along together the double 
degree program can be completed in five years. Those interested should contact 
the Freshman Engineering Division and the Dean of Liberal Arts. 

ECONOMICS 

(Also see agriculture and life sciences.) 
Patterson Hall 
Professor W. D. Toussaint, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: A. J. Bartley, A. J. Coutu, D. M. Hoover, L. A. Ihnen, G. D. Irwin 
(USDA), H. B. James, P. R. Johnson, R. A. King, G. A. Mathia, B. M. Olsen, 
J. A. Seagraves, R. L. Simmons, J. G. Sutherland (USDA), C. B. Turner, T. D. 
Wallace, J. C. Williamson Jr.; Adjunct Professor: D. R. Dixon; Professor 
Emeriti: J. G. Maddox, E. W. Swanson, T. W. Wood; Associate Professors: 
D. S. Ball, J. S. Chappell, M. M. El-Kammash, E. W. Erickson, R. M. Fearn, 



197 



B. L. Gardner, C. W. Farrell Jr., E. W. Jones, F. A. Mangum Jr., E. C. Pasour 
Jr., R. J. Peeler Jr., R. K. Perrin, R. A. Schrimper, R. E. Sylla, J. W. 
Wilson; Assistant Professors: J. B. Bullock, G. A. Carlson, L. E. Danielson, 
L.M. Ennis Jr., A. R. Gallant, H. C. Gilliam Jr. (USDA), T. J. Grennes, 
D. L. Holley Jr., D. N. Hyman, C. P. Jones, J. C. Matthews Jr., R. B. Mo 
Burney Jr., M. B. McElroy, L. B. Perkinson (USDA), W. P. Pinna, J. C. 
Poindexter Jr., R. C. Reinoso, H. A. Sandman, C. R. Shumway Jr.; Assistant 
Professor Emeritus: O. G. Thompson; Instructors: J. D. Acker, C. H. Baker, 
A. M. Beals Jr., F. V. Harrell Jr., Judith M. Jefferys, J. S. Lapp, J. H. Reeder, 
D. H. Stuart 

EXTENSION 

Professor F. D. Sobering, In Charge Extension Economics 

Professors: R. C. Brooks, G. L. Capel, D. G. Harwood, T. E. Nichols, E. A. Proctor, 
C. R. Pugh, W. L. Turner, C. R. Weathers; Associate Professors: J. G. Allgood, 
R. S. Boal, R. D. Dahle, L. H. Hammond, H. A. Homme, H. L. Liner, D. F. 
Neuman, P. S. Stone, R. C. Wells; Assistant Professors: J. E. Ikerd, E. M. 
Stallings, Ruby P. Uzzle; Instructor: D. C. Pardue 

The general objective of the program in economics is to develop in the student 
such critical and analytical skills as underlie the ability to understand economic 
problems and institutions, both in their historical setting and under conditions of 
change. The curriculum furnishes the academic background necessary for positions 
in industry, government service and graduate work in economics and the social 
sciences. 

The Department of Economics offers programs in several fields of economics at 
both the undergraduate and graduate levels of study. In addition to the basic 
economics option, two other options are available to the economics major. The 
business management and accounting options offer opportunities for professional 
training in addition to the strong economics background. The accounting option is 
directed towards fulfilling the educational prerequisites to writing the professional 
examination for the Certified Public Accountant. The business management 
option has a combination of business courses that are intended to provide skills for 
dealing with problems at firm or institutional levels. 

The department is administered jointly by the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences and the School of Liberal Arts. For information on the field of agricultural 
economics, see pages 87-90 under Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

The department also has a major service function to perform for the various 
technical schools and the Division of Continuing Education. An increasing number 
of curricula now offer a minor program in economics or business. 

FACILITIES 

The department has a modern, well-equipped library including technical 
reference books, major professional journals and government publications. Research 
publications from other institutions throughout the United States are on file. 
Graduate students in economics are provided office space and research equipment. 
Computational facilities are available for students whose research problems 
involve extensive analysis of data, as well as for those students who want to learn 
to use computer facilities. The department has a well-trained clerical staff and 
maintains an IBM 1050 Terminal connected to an IBM System/370 Model 165 
operated by the Triangle University Computational Center. Access is also available 
to other medium speed terminals and an IBM System/360 Model 40 located on the 
University campus. 



198 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

BASIC ECONOMICS OPTION 



The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in economics consist of 27 hours 
in prescribed and elected courses. Of these, 12 hours are required in the core. 
The remaining 15 hours are restricted electives in economics which are primarily 
society oriented. 



Credits 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 

EC 302 National Income and Economic 

Welfare 3 

EC 317 Introduction to Methods of 

Economic Analysis* 3 



EC 490 Senior Seminar in Economics 3 

Restricted Electives in Economics 15 



TOTAL 27 



ACCOUNTING OPTION 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in economics, accounting option, con- 
sists of 39 hours in prescribed and elected courses. Of these, 12 hours are 
required in the core. The remaining 27 hours are divided among six hours of 
restricted electives in economics and 21 hours in accounting courses. 

Credits 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 EC 468 Professional Accountancy Resume . 3 

EC 302 National Income and Economic Restricted Electives in Economics 6 

Welfare 3 Accounting concentration 21 

EC 317 Introduction to Methods of — 

Economic Analysis* 3 TOTAL 39 



* ST 311, 361 or 371 may be substituted for EC 317. 



BUSINESS MANAGEMENT OPTION 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in economics, business management 
option, consists of 33 hours in prescribed and elected courses. Of these, 18 hours are 
required as the core. The remaining 15 hours are divided among six hours of 
restricted electives in economics and nine hours from three of the five areas of 
business concentration. 

Credits 
EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of 

Financial Reporting 3 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 

EC 302 National Income and Economic 

Welfare 3 

EC 317 Introduction to Methods of 

Economic Analysis* 3 TOTAL 33 



EC 407 Business Law I 3 

EC 490 Senior Seminar in Economics 3 

Restricted Electives in Economics 6 

Electives from Areas of Business 

Concentration 9 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in economics consists of 27 hours 
in prescribed and elected courses. Of these, 15 or 18 hours are required as the 
core. Nine of the remaining hours must consist of restricted electives in economics. 

Credits 

EC 317 Introduction to Methods of 

Economic Analysis* 3 

EC 490 Senior Seminar in Economics 3 

Restricted Electives in Economics 9 

TOTAL 27 



EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

EC 206 The Price System** 3 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 

EC 302 National Income and Economic 

Welfare 3 



ST 311, 361, or 371 may be substituted for EC 317. 

EC 206 may be waived subject to the approval of the student's faculty adviser. 



199 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

Students must complete at least two courses selected from the specified list 
of restricted economics electives, the two intermediate theory courses (EC 301 and 
EC 302) and one of the basic statistics courses before enrolling in Senior Seminar 
(EC 490 or EC 468). 

The restricted electives, primarily society oriented, are the following: EC 370, 
(HI 370), 402, 410, 413, 430, 431, 440, 441, 442, 448, 451, 470 (HI 470), 475, 491, 501, 
502, 510, 515, 521, 533, 550, 551, 555, 561, 570 and 574. 

Additional firm-oriented economics electives (unrestricted) are available. These 
courses are often considered business courses and are intended to provide skills 
for dealing with problems at firm level. The areas of business concentration from 
which the student taking the business option must select are the following: 

Finance: EC 402. 415, 420, 422 
Business Management: EC 310, 525. 535 
Marketing: EC 311, 411, 430, 521 
Personnel: EC 426, 431, 432 
Production: EC 303. 425, 523, 551 

Courses from other departments may be used to fulfill business concentration 
requirements upon approval of the Department of Economics. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Economics offers programs of study leading to the Master 
of Economics, the Master of Arts in economics, the Master of Science in agricul- 
tural economics -and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Prospective applicants should 
consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



ENGLISH 

Winston Hall 

Professor Larry S. Champion, Head of the Department 
Professor R. B. White Jr., Assistant Head of the Department 

Professors: M. Halperen, H. G. Kincheloe, B. G. Koonce Jr., F. H. Moore Jr., 
G. Owen Jr., C. A. Parker, W. B. Toole III; Professor Emeritus: L. Hartley; 
Associate Professors: L. J. Betts Jr., P. E. Blank Jr., L. R. Camp, E. P. 
Dandridge Jr., P. H. Davis, J. D. Durant, J. B. Easley, W. G. Franklin, 
A. S. Knowles Jr., W. E. Meyers, N. G. Smith, T. N. Walters, P. Williams 
Jr.; Assistant Professors: Barbara H. Baines, J. W. Clark Jr., H. A. Har- 
grave, W. E. Haskin, M. T. Hester, C. L. Jenkins Jr., R. A. Lasseter 
III, V. B. Lentz, Catherine E. Moore, H. E. Munn Jr., M. S. Reynolds, 
Nancy B. Rich, J. M. Robertson. Jean J. Smoot, A. F. Stein, Marilyn M. 
Upchurch, S. S. Ward, H. C. West, Mary C. Williams; Instructors: T. L. 
Attaway, Judith H. Bolch, Virginia C. Downs, T. C. Heffernan Jr., Linda T. 
Holley, C. G. Keshian, J. A. Kilby Jr., Lucinda H. Mackethan, J. P. Malcolm, 
T. H. Poston, Sybil R. Ricks, D. D. Short, R. V. Young Jr., Special Lecturers: 
G. W. Barrax, Audrey H. Bradley 

The Department of English offers both basic and advanced courses in composition, 
speech, radio, television, language and literature. The freshman courses, common 
to all curricula and prerequisite to all advanced courses in English, are designed 
to give intensive training and practice in written communication, plus an intro- 
duction to literary types. Courses in communication of technical information, in 
creative and advanced expository writing, and in speech are offered to meet course 
requirements in special curricula and to provide electives for interested students. 
Advanced courses are available for a major in literature, a major in speech-commu- 
nication in the Bachelor of Arts program, and a concentration in literature and in 
communications in the Bachelor of Science program, as well as for general electives. 

200 



MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

For the English major in the Bachelor of Arts program the student must schedule 
30 semester hours beyond the usual six hours in freshman composition. Basic 
requirements include the sophomore survey of English literature, a course in 
Shakespeare and at least one course in American writers. Beyond these courses, 
the student may pursue his special interests within the limits of two recommended 
categories. In the final semester, a special seminar will serve as a capstone to 
his study. For a teaching certificate, 18 hours in professional courses and 
practicum must be included. 

For students electing the Bachelor of Science program with English as an area 
of concentration, eight courses and seminars above the basic freshman and 
sophomore courses will be selected with the aid of departmental advisers. 

MAJOR IN SPEECH-COMMUNICATION 

The major in speech-communication in the Bachelor of Arts program includes 
30 semester hours. The curriculum in speech-communication requires four pre- 
scribed courses in speech and the usual senior seminar designed to culminate 
study in the discipline. In addition, the student may elect courses within the field 
from among offerings in interactive communication, public address, oral inter- 
pretation, drama, and radio-television to complete the 30 hour requirement. For 
a teaching certificate, a more prescribed curriculum is necessary and in addition 
18 hours in professional courses and practicum must be included. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

In addition to the Bachelor's programs above, the Department of English offers 
the Master of Arts degree with concentration in English or American litei*ature. 
The program is designed either to provide the student with a terminal course of 
study or to serve as the first year toward the doctorate. Prospective applicants 
should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



HISTORY 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor L. W. Seegers, Acting Head of the Department 
Professor M. S. Downs, Assistant Department Head 

Professors: B. F. Beers, M. L. Brown Jr., R. W. Greenlaw, Doris E. King, 
S. Noblin; Adjunct Professor: H. G. Jones; Associate Professors: R. N. Elliott, 
W. C. Harris, J. P. Hobbs, J. M. Riddle, S. Suval, Mary E. Wheeler; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: L. W. Barnhardt; Assistant Professors: J. R. Banker, 
W. H. Beezley, C. H. Carlton, C. W. Harper Jr., (Education), C. F. Kolb (Con- 
tinuing Education), Judith P. Pulley, R. H. Sack, Edith D. Sylla; Instructors: 
Sandra P. Babb, Rosemary E. Begeman, J. E. Crisp, R. S. Dionne, H. D. Metz- 

GAR JR., J. A. MULHOLLAND, F. M. NICHOLS JR. 

An understanding of the historical background of our times is expected of the 
educated person. The Department of History makes it possible for students to gain 
this understanding through the wide range and variety of courses at all levels from 
introductory through graduate. 

Any of the department's introductory courses may be counted towards fulfillment 
of the requirements in the humanities and social sciences of the Schools of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering and Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences. Students in the School of Liberal Arts are required to take two semesters 
of history — one dealing with a culture significantly different from their own (ex- 
amples listed in Group I), and the other dealing with our own or another post- 
industrial society (examples listed in Group II). 

201 



Group I Group II 

HI 204. 207, 208, 209. 215 HI 205. 210. 233, 241 

216, 263. 264. 265, 266 242. 243, 244, 272 

Any 200-level course may be taken without prerequisite and most advanced 
courses (300-400 level) require only that students have had at least one three hour 
course in history. Graduate courses, although open to advanced undergraduates, 
generally have a prerequisite of six hours of advanced level history. 

The department cooperates with the Division of Continuing Education in 
making available certain introductory and graduate courses at night and by corres- 
pondence. 

MAJOR IN HISTORY 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Program — A history major must take 30 hours of course 
work in history in addition to the six hours required of all students in the 
School of Liberal Arts. These 30 hours must include the senior seminar, HI 492. 
At least 18 hours of the 30 must be at the 300 level or above, 

B.A. PROGRAM WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Bachelor of Arts Program ivith Teacher Certification — History majors may 
enroll in the teacher education program in social sciences offered by the School of 
Liberal Arts in cooperation with the School of Education. Students who complete 
this program are eligible for certification to teach social studies in secondary 
schools in North Carolina. The requirements of the program include professional 
courses in education in addition to the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree, 
and a major in one of the social studies. Students desiring to enter this program 
should declare their intention by the spring of the sophomore year and are required 
to file a formal application for admission which must be approved in order for them 
to participate. 

CONCENTRATION IN HISTORY 

Bachelor of Science Program — A concentration in history will involve 18 hours 
of course work beyond the six hours required of all students in the School of Liberal 
Arts, plus the senior seminar, HI 492. Of the 18 hours, at least 12 must be at the 300 
level or above. 

GRADUATE STUDY IN HISTORY 

In addition to the Bachelor's programs, the Department of History offers the 
Master of Arts degree with a concentration in American or European history or 
archival administration. The program is designed either to provide the student 
with a terminal course of study or to serve as the first year toward a doctorate at 
another institution. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School 
Catalog. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor Alan A. Gonzalez, Head of the Department 

Professors: G. W. Poland, E. M. Stack; Associate Professors: F. J. Allred, Mary 
Paschal, E. W. Rollins Jr., H. Tucker Jr.; Assistant Professors: T. P. Feeny, 
G. Gonzalez, W. Holler, D. R. Kloe, Virginia Prichard, C. R. Reynolds, S. E. 
Simonsen, Gilbert Smith, Virginia Smith; Instructors: N. T. Dill, Bruce 
Hathaway, W. Kosmin, Natacha P. Mann 

The Department of Modern Languages provides instruction in French, German, 
Spanish, Italian and Russian as well as special instruction in English for foreign 

202 



students. In addition to elementary grammar, courses are offered in the literature 
and culture of these language areas. A language laboratory provides further 
opportunity to students to improve aural-oral skill in a target language. 

For a major in French or Spanish in the Bachelor of Arts program 30 hours 
beyond the six hours of elementary language are required. Aside from this the 
normal requirement for the Bachelor's degree in Liberal Arts must be met, in- 
cluding either ENG 261-262 or ENG 265-266. Majors desiring a teaching certifi- 
cate must take required courses in education and psychology. 

There are special courses for graduate students preparing to fulfill language 
requirements for advanced degrees. For graduate students already having a reading 
knowledge of a foreign language, examinations for certifications are given. 



MULTI-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Multi-Disciplinary Studies Committee 

Professor R. S. Bryan (Philosophy and Religion), Chairman 

Professor W. B. Toole (English) 

Professor M. S. Downs (Histoi~y) 

Associate Professor 3. W. Wilson (Economics) 

Assistant Professor L. E. Bennett (Politics) 

The multi-disciplinary studies program provides the opportunity for a student 
to design his or her own academic major. Instead of following the requirements for 
a major in one of the traditional disciplines, the candidate for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree in Multi- Disciplinary studies has the responsibility of organizing a concen- 
tration or field of specialization from two or more disciplines. A concentration in 
Latin American studies might, for example, combine related courses in language, 
literature, history, economics, sociology, and politics. 

The freshman and sophomore basic requirements for the multi-disciplinary 
studies program are the same as for the other Bachelor of Arts programs in Lib- 
eral Arts. In satisfying the basic requirements in language, humanities, social 
science, mathematics and natural science, the student should, whenever possible, 
choose those courses that are most appropriate as background for the courses in 
his major concentration. 

ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM 

To become a candidate for a major in multi-disciplinary studies, a student first 
secures application forms and information from the office of the dean of the School 
of Liberal Arts (Tompkins Hall, Room 118) or from the office of the chairman of 
the Multi-Disciplinary Studies Committee (Harrelson Hall, Room 122). He or 
she then prepares a tentative proposal which includes a list of courses com- 
prising 30 credit hours and an essay of 300-500 words explaining his or her 
reasons for desiring to make this set of courses the field of specialization. The 
student's proposal is reviewed by a faculty sponsor and submitted to the Multi- 
Disciplinary Committee for consideration. After a thorough examination to deter- 
mine whether the set of courses proposed as a multi-disciplinary major is academ- 
ically sound and coherent, the committee will recommend that the dean of the 
School of Liberal Arts accept or reject the proposal; or it will be sent back to the 
student and his sponsor with suggestions for modification and resubmission. 

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor R. S. Bryan, Head of the Department 

203 



Professor: P. A. Bredenberg; Professor Emeritus: W. N. HlCKS; Associate Pro- 
fessors: W. L. Highfill, R. S. Metzger, J. L. Middleton, T. H. Regan; Assistant 
Professors: W. C. Fitzgerald Jr.. G. A. Lear Jr.. A. D. Vandeveer; Instructors: 
R. P. Forrer, W. G. Gillmor, H. D. Levin, M. P. O'Neil, C. L. Stalnaker 

The function of the Department of Philosophy and Religion at North Carolina 
State University is twofold: (1) It serves the needs of the University at large by 
providing courses devoted to the discussion of the great philosophic ideas of 
western civilization and of the religious notions which have had an impact on all 
of civilization, and (2) it provides an opportunity for extensive technical study in 
philosophy for those students who wish to concentrate in this field either for its own 
sake or as an ideal intellectual foundation for subsequent graduate or professional 
study. 

Programs leading to two degrees in philosophy, the Bachelor of Arts and the 
Bachelor of Science, are offered by the department. Candidates for the Bachelor 
of Arts degree in philosophy must complete 30 hours in philosophy in addition to 
the introductory course, Problems and Types of Philosophy (PHI 205). These must 
include either Logic (PHI 201) or Symbolic Logic (PHI 335); courses in the 
development of western philosophic thought (PHI 300, 317, and 318); and a seminar 
(PHI 490). Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in philosophy must 
complete 27 hours in philosophy. These must include PHI 300, PHI 317, PHI 318, 
PHI 335, PHI 490 and PHI 405, Philosophy of Science. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Carmichael Gymnasium 

Professor F. R. Drews, Head of the Department 

Professor Emeritus: P. H. Derr; Associate Professors: J. B. Edwards Jr., A. M. 
Hoch, H. Keating. W. R. Leonhardt, W. H. Sonner: Assistant Professors: 
G. R. Boettner, N. E. Cooper, J. M. Daniels, J. W. Isenhour Jr., W. P. Marley, 
M. S. Rhodes, W. M. Shea, Elizabeth A. Smaltz; Instructors: J. W. Barker, 
Andrea L. Berle, J. V. Brothers, W. A. Cheek, R. C. Combs, T. W. Evans, R. G. 
Gwyn, Sandra L. Hill, Virginia M. Leath, C. E. Patch, J. L. Shannon 

North Carolina State University requires from two to four semesters in physical 
education to be taken consecutively during the freshman and sophomore years. The 
specific number of semesters of required physical education is determined for each 
student by the Department of Physical Education based on physical fitness testing 
and individual interests. Insofar as staff, facilities and allotment of time will permit, 
each student is guided into courses which will best meet one's individual needs. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES 

Prescribed courses are designed to meet the specific needs of the student as 
determined by tests. The prescribed courses offered are: Health and Physical 
Fitness, Beginning Swimming I, Beginning Swimming II, Restricted Activity I 
and Restricted Activity II. The Health and Physical Fitness course is required of 
all new freshmen. The Department of Physical Education also requires a demon- 
strated survival swimming ability or placement in the appropriate beginning 
swimming course. 

CONTROLLED ELECTIVE COURSES 

All elective courses are grouped under one of the following areas: aquatics, 
combatives, developmental activities, individual sports and team sports. Students 
are encouraged to develop proficiency in at least two vigorous life-time sports. 



204 



POLITICS 

Tompkins Hall 

Professor W. J. Block, Head of the Department 

Professors: F. V. Cahill, J. T. Caldwell, A. Holtzman, R. 0. Tilman; Associate 
Professors: H. G. Kebschull, J. M. McClain, K. S. Petersen; Assistant 
Professors: L. E. Bennett, T. M. Brownlee, W. G. Ellis, J. H. Gilbert, J. A. 
Hurwitz, T. E. Marshall, J. P. Mastro, M. S. Soroos, J. O. Williams; 
Instructors: Hope M. Brogden, P. M. Stephenson, D. A. Wentworth 

The Department of Politics offers both basic and advanced courses in all major 
fields of the discipline: American government and politics (local, state and 
national), comparative government and politics, international relations and 
organizations, political theory, public administration and methodology of political 
science. Although the department provides an area in which students may con- 
centrate their major efforts, it also affords opportunities for the study of government 
and administration to students in other curricula and schools and to students at 
Fort Bragg. Graduate courses in politics are available to majors and to students 
seeking advanced degrees in other curricula. 

The department conducts a State Legislative Internship Program in alternate 
years. It also participates in the State Government Internship Program, which 
functions under the sponsorship of the Institute of Government at Chapel Hill. 

MAJORS IN POLITICS 

Bachelor of Arts Program — A major in politics requires 30 hours of course work 
in the discipline, including PS 200, Introduction to Politics; PS 391, Methodology 
of Political Science; a subsequent seminar in politics; and a course in early or 
modern political theory. Students are expected to include in their programs 
advanced courses in at least three of the fields in the discipline, although they may 
concentrate their work in one field. 

The department recommends that its majors, whenever practicable, take MA 111 
and MA 112 in fulfillment of the mathematics requirement in the School of Liberal 
Arts. 

CONCENTRATION IN POLITICS 

Bachelor of Science Program — A concentration in politics requires 24 hours of 
course work in the discipline, including PS 200, PS 391 and a subsequent seminar 
in politics. 

Criminal Justice (either B.A. or B.S.) — The Departments of Politics and 
Sociology and Anthropology offer undergraduate majors a concentration in criminal 
justice. This concentration includes 24 semester hours of specialized study. The 
objective of the program is to develop students who may move into middle manage- 
ment and policy making positions in agencies such as police, court, correctional, 
probation and parole agencies. 

Students who are interested in the Criminal Justice Program should contact 
Mr. David Wentworth, 221 Tompkins Hall, Department of Politics, or Dr. Elizabeth 
Suval, 230 1911 Building, Department of Sociology and Anthropology. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Politics offers the Master of Arts degree in politics and the 
Master of Public Affairs degree. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate 
School Catalog. 



205 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

(Also see agriculture and life sciences.) 
1911 Building 
Professor S. C. Mayo, Head of the Department 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: L. W. Drabick, C. P. Marsh, G. C. McCann, J. N. Young; WNR Profes- 
sor Emeritus: C. H. Hamilton; Associate Professors: A. C. Davis, C. V. Mercer, 
H. D. Rawls, M. M. Sawhney, Odell Uzzell; Adjunct Associate Professors: W. J. 
Buffaloe, R. L. Rollins Jr.; Assistant Professors: R. C. Brisson, W. B. 
Clifford II, C. G. Dawson, G. L. Faulkner, T. M. Hyman, K. D. Kim, R. L. 
Moxley, R. D. Mustian, J. G. Peck, D. J. Steffensmeier, Elizabeth M. Suval, 
Patricia L. Tobin; Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. L. Franklin; Instructors: 
Linda M. Breytspraak, D. F. Collins, S. H. Heikkinen, W. B. Hutchinson, 
G. S. Nickerson, L. J. Rhoades, R. C. Wimberley 

EXTENSION 

Associate Professor J. N. Collins, In Charge of Community Development 

Professor: J. D. George; Professor Emeritus: J. W. Crawford; Associate Professor: 
T. N. Hobgood Jr., M. E. Voland; Assistant Professors: J. A. Christenson, V. E. 
Hamilton, C. E. Lewis, J. M. Stewart, P. P. Thompson 

The major aim of this department is to teach students the principles and tech- 
niques for understanding human group behavior. More specifically the department 
seeks: (1) to train students to become leaders in organizing groups and com- 
munities and in administering programs; (2) to qualify exceptional students on 
the undergraduate and graduate levels for sociological research, teaching and 
extension work; (3) to solve problems in human group relations through scientific 
research; and (4) to extend research results to the people of the State. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The following departmental requirements must be met by all students majoring 
in sociology: A minimum of 30 hours in the major field including SOC 202, Principles 
of Sociology; SOC 301, Human Behavior; SOC 315, Social Thought; SOC 416, 
Research Methods; a minimum of five electives on the 300 or higher level in 
sociology; and one semester of SOC 490, Senior Seminar in Sociology. The depart- 
ment also requires ANT 252, Cultural Anthropology, at least one course in 
psychology and one elective in statistics. In addition, the department offers a 
concentration of courses in social work. This is to prepare students for employment 
in human services and to qualify majors for graduate social work education. The 
concentration includes two semesters of supervised field work. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Master of Science, Master of Sociology and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are 
offered by this department. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate 
School Catalog. 

SPEECH-COMMUNICATION 

(See English.) 



206 




Students gain an insight to play production from this Shakespearian Globe theater on 
permanent display in the D.H. Hill undergraduate library. 



207 




Today almost all areas of business, industry and education use the computer. In 
addition to those seeking a degree in computer science, many departments now 
have their students use the campus facilities as one of the important educational 
tools. 



208 



PHYSICAL AND 
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Cox Hall 

Arthur Clayton Menius Jr., Dean 

Jasper Durham Memory, Assistant Dean 

The demand for high caliber scientists, mathematicians and engineers continues 
to outpace the national supply. The need for persons trained in these areas has been 
a contributing factor in the growth of the School of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences since its inception in 1960. The school performs a threefold function: the 
training of potential scientists and mathematicians; the technical support of 
curricula in agriculture and life sciences, design, education, engineering, forest 
resources, liberal arts and textiles; and research in physical sciences and mathe- 
matics. These activities are carried out by the seven academic Departments of 
Biochemistry, Chemistry, Computer Science, Statistics, Geosciences, Mathematics 
and Physics. The Institute of Statistics (Raleigh section) and the Department of 
Physical Sciences Research are also associated with the School of Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences. 

Graduates of the school are recruited for technical and administrative posi- 
tions in industrial research and development laboratories, universities and col- 
leges, nonprofit research organizations and government agencies. A large per- 
centage of the graduates undertake advanced study leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A lifetime of challenge and opportunity is offered 
to students who choose these curricula of study. 

The high school student with an above-average perfonnance in mathematics, 
chemistry or physics, and a basic interest in natural phenomena and their mathe- 
matical descriptions, is encouraged to consider a career in physical sciences or 
mathematics. Both ability and motivation are essential prerequisites for successful 
completion of the bachelor's degree requirements. The school has consistently 
attracted outstanding students, as evidenced by the fact that approximately 
one-third of its students graduate with honors or high honors. 

FACILITIES 

The offices of the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences are located in 
the seven-story Cox Hall, together with the Departments of Physics and Statistics. 
The adjoining Harrelson Hall, with its 77 classrooms, has as one of its occupants 
the Department of Mathematics and provides additional classroom space for the 
school. The new nine-story Dabney Hall, which is adjacent to Cox Hall, houses the 
Departments of Chemistry and Computer Science. Facilities for geoscience 
instruction are provided in Withers Hall, a four-story structure near the center 
of the campus. Physics research laboratories are located in Daniels Hall and the 
Nuclear Science Building and at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory 
in Durham. Biochemistry research is underway in Polk Hall and Withers Hall. 

The school is fully equipped for instruction and research. Special equipment and 
laboratories associated with the school include a plasma physics laboratory 
supported by a research tube-making facility; a complete radio-chemistry labora- 
tory; a one-million volt Van de Graaff accelerator; analog and ambilog computers; 
an IBM 1130 digital; a laser research laboratory; a Varian Associates HA-100 
high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; an upper atmosphere 
laboratory; a biomathematics and biophysics laboratory; undergraduate and 
graduate desk computing laboratories; biochemical research and teaching 
laboratories; and an ultraviolet-infrared-visible spectrosopic laboratory. Other 
facilities on the campus available for teaching and research are electron micro- 



209 



scopes, a heterogeneous nuclear reactor designed for operation at 100 kilowatts, 
complete X-ray laboratories with diffraction and radiographic equipment, a 
Beckman Model E analytical ultracentrifuge, precision instrument shops, and an 
IBM 360 Model 40 digital computer connected by telecommunication lines to the 
Model 75 at the Triangle Universities Computation Center. North Carolina State 
University also participates in the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory 
which has a 0-35 Mev. cyclo-graaff accelerator. 

CURRICULA 

The school offers undergraduate programs of study leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree with a major in mathematics, chemistry, computer science, statistics, 
geology or physics. These curricula have similar freshman years, thereby enabling 
a student to change, without loss of time, from one department to another in the 
school during the freshman year. 

SHORT COURSES AND INSTITUTES 

The School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences offers several short courses 
and specialized institutes throughout the academic year and during the summer 
months in chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics, physics, and 
statistics for high school teachers and college professors. For more information, 
write to the dean of the school. 

In addition, certain regular courses may be taken for credit through correspon- 
dence or at the evening college of the Division of Continuing Education in Raleigh, 
Charlotte or in the Greensboro-Burlington-Winston-Salem area. For a listing of 
these courses, write to the North Carolina State University Division of Continuing 
Education, Raleigh. 

SUPERIOR STUDENT AND HONOR PROGRAMS 

For several years, exceptional students have been selected to participate in the 
Superior Student Program during their freshman and sophomore years. Enriched 
courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics and English have been developed 
specifically for the participants in this program. At the beginning of the junior 
year, the most promising may select special courses, participate in undergraduate 
research, and receive some graduate credit toward the Master of Science degree 
during the senior year. 

Well-prepared students entering the school may seek advanced placement in 
mathematics, chemistry, physics or history by passing qualifying examinations. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

In addition to University-wide extracurricular activities and honor organizations, 
the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences has student chapters of the 
following professional and honor organizations: Society of Physics Students, Pi Mu 
Epsilon, the American Chemical Society, and the Association for Computing 
Machinery. 

The Science Council, which is composed of elected students from the school, 
sponsors and participates in a wide variety of technical and social activities. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Master of Science degree is available with a major in biochemistry, biomath- 
ematics, chemistry, geology, marine sciences, statistics, mathematics, applied 
mathematics and physics. The Master of Applied Mathematics, Master of Bio- 
mathematics and Master of Mathematics Education are offered. The Doctor of 
Philosophy degree is available in biochemistry, biomathematics, chemistry, marine 
sciences, statistics, mathematics, applied mathematics and physics. 



210 



CHEMISTRY 

Dabney Hall and Withers Hall 

Professor Z Z. Hugus Jr., Head of the Department 

Professor R. H. Loeppert, Assistant Head of the Department 

Professor F. C. Hentz Jr., Director of General Chemistry 

Professors: H. A. Bent, L. H. Bowen, C. L. Bumgardner, G. O. Doak, L. D. 
Freedman, F. W. Getzen, S. G. Levine, G. G. Long, W. J. Peterson, W. A. Reid, 
P. P. Sutton, W. P. Tucker, R. C. White; Adjunct Professor: M. E. Wall; 
Professors Emeriti: C. C. Robinson, G. H. Satterfield; Associate Professors: 
H. H. Carmichael, A. F. Coots, M. K. DeArmond, C. E. Gleit, L. A. Jones, 
M. L. Miles, C. G. Moreland, A. F. Schreiner, G. H. Wahl Jr., Associate 
Professor Emeritus: W. E. Jordan; Assistant Professors: T. J. Blalock, 
J. Bordner, T. C. Caves, K. W. Hanck, W. P. Ingram Jr., S. S. Sawin, T. M. 
Ward, D. W. Wertz; Instructors: W. R. Johnston, Elizabeth H. Manning, 
G. M. Oliver, Graye J. Shaw; Instructor Emeritus: J. W. Morgan; Teaching 
and Research Technician: Margaret C. Bundy; Associate Members of the Facul- 
ty: D. M. Cates, H. A. Rutherford (Textile Chemistry) 

Chemistry is the science dealing with the composition of all substances and 
changes in their composition. It is involved with almost every aspect of modern 
life. Chemists have contributed in large measure to the synthetic fiber industry, 
petroleum products and fuels, plastics, the food processing industry, nuclear 
energy, modern drugs and medicine. Today more than ever a chemist is concerned 
with the fundamental building blocks of all materials — atoms and molecules. This 
study is leading to a firmer basis for improving old materials, developing new ones 
and controlling the environment in which we live. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The chemical industry is the nation's largest manufacturing industry. Chemists 
comprise by far the largest proportion of scientists in the United States, and every 
indication is that future demands for chemists will continue to grow. A wider 
variety of jobs is open to the chemist than any other scientist: from biochemistry 
to metallurgy, from space science to oceanography, from sales or management to 
pure research. The Bachelor of Science program in chemistry provides an excellent 
premedical curriculum. Chemists are employed in almost every field based on 
modern technology. Because of the demand for training in chemistry, opportunities 
for a chemist in the field of education are many and varied. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

A chemist's training must be broad. The Bachelor of Science curriculum (as 
shown below), accredited by the American Chemical Society, includes a strong 
background of mathematics, physics and the liberal arts. The basic areas of 
organic, physical, inorganic and analytical chemistry are stressed. Laboratory and 
classroom work develop the skills, knowledge and inquiring spirit necessary for a 
successful career in chemistry. The minor field and elective credits allow individual 
diversity at the junior and senior levels. Many undergraduates participate in 
current research in the department through part-time employment or a senior 
research project. The curriculum prepares the student for the wide variety of jobs 
open to the Bachelor of Science chemist or for advanced work at the graduate level. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, CHEMICAL SCIENCES OPTION 

The chemical sciences option provides a more flexible program for students who 
do not wish to become professional chemists but who wish to pursue interdisciplinary 

211 



studies with an emphasis on chemistry. This program has somewhat less stringent 
requirements in mathematics, physics and chemistry than does the accredited 
Bachelor of Science program, thus permitting greater latitude in selection of courses 
from other disciplines. A student who desires this option should enroll intially in 
the standard Bachelor of Science curriculum. Near the end of the first year, after 
discussing his goals and proposed program with a departmental advisory com- 
mittee, he may with their approval, transfer to the chemical sciences option. 



B.S. CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 106 Laboratory Techniques I 1 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 

Social Science 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 108 Laboratory Techniques II 1 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

PY 201 General Physics* 4 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

English Elective 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

PY 202 General Physics* 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

English Elective 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential 

Equations I 3 

PY 203 General Physics* 4 

Free Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



Fall Semester 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis 3 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 

Human ities — Social Sciences 3 

MLG 101 Elementary German I 3 

Minor** 3 



15 



Credits 



CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry ... 3 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry II 

Laboratory 2 

Human ities — Social Sciences 3 

MLG 102 Elementary German II 3 

Minor 3 



17 



Fall Semester 



CH 411 Analytical Chemistry I 4 

Chemistry Elective 2 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Mi nor 3 

Free Electives 4 



it; 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
CH 413 Analytical Chemistry II 4 



Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Minor 3 

Free Electives 6 

16 
Total Hours for Graduation 131 



♦The sequence PY 205, PY 208, PY 407 may be substituted for PY 201, PY 202, PY 203, with 
approval of the advisor. 
**The minor may be in any field closely related to chemistry, such as mathematics, physics, 
computer science, geoscience, statistics, biological sciences, engineering or science education. A 
total of four courses in two such areas may constitute a "split" minor. The minor field should be 
chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser prior to or during the junior year. 



212 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Dabney Hall 

Professor P. E. Lewis, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor: N. F. Williamson Jr., Administrative Assistant 

Professor: L. B. Martin Jr.; Associate Professors; D. A. Link, Y. N. Patt; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: L. H. Williams; Assistant Professors: S. D. 
Danielopoulos, R. J. Fornaro, J. W. Hanson, T. L. Honeycutt, J. D. Powell, 
W. E. Robbins, W. A. Sillars, C. W. Skinner, A. L. Tharp; Instructors: H. J. 
Beaujon, A. B. Finger, D. W. Reid 

The discipline of computer science has developed during the past 25 years as a 
direct consequence of the rapid growth of the electronic computer. No single tech- 
nological development in history has had a greater impact on man and on the way 
he lives. The uses of modern computers are diverse and new applications continue 
to arise. They are used to help make and operate our automobiles, airplanes and 
space ships; to design our highways, bridges and buildings; to handle banking 
transactions and to assist in management decisions; to analyze farm production; 
as a research tool for the scientist; to monitor manufacturing processes, utilities 
and communication; and to provide a multitude of other services. Almost all areas 
of industry, education and business make use of the computer. 

The program of computer science at North Carolina State University is designed 
to train students to contribute to these applications and, if they choose, to continue 
their training further through graduate study. Methods and techniques are stressed 
for using the computer in both scientific and business applications. Students may 
elect to major in the field working toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Computer Science. Students in other departments may select as electives certain 
courses in computer science to broaden their program of study. 

In addition to providing a sound background of core courses, the computer science 
curriculum also provides for more extensive training in several areas or tracks. At 
the beginning of the junior year, majors in computer science may elect to con- 
centrate study for the last two years of the degree program in one of the following 
three tracks: 

1. Scientific Applications 

2. Management Decisions 

3. Programming Systems and Languages 

Twenty-four credits (called track requirements and restricted electives) may be 
selected from an approved set of courses appropriate to the track chosen by the 
student. 

There is a need for professionals who are trained in computer science. Salaries 
are good, and the variety of work is satisfying. 



COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

freshman year 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming .... 3 CSC 211 Programming Languages 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and MA 201 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 Calculus II 4 

PMS 100 Orientation Basic Science 3 

Basic Science 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 — 

14 

14 



213 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CSC 112 Basic Computer Organization 

and Assembly Language 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

MA 231 Introduction to Linear Algebra ... 3 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Free Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 302 Introduction to 

Numerical Methods 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

English Literature Elective 3 

MA 312 Introduction to 

Differential Equations 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 



IT 



Fall Semester 

CSC 311 Data Structures 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 

CSC 312 Computer Organization 



CSC 322 Applied Algebraic Structures 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

ST 371 Introduction to Probability 

and Statistics 4 

Restricted Elective 3 



16 



Credits 



and Logic 3 

CSC Track Requirement 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Free Elective 6 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CSC 411 Introduction to Simulation 3 

CSC Track Requirement 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Restricted Electives 6 



IS 



Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability, 

Language and Automata 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Restricted Electives 6 

Free Elective 3 

15 
Total Hours for Graduation 126 



GEOSCIENCES 

Withers Hall 

Professor C. J. Leith, Head of the Department 

Professors: H. S. Brown, E. G. Droessler, J. Lyman, W. J. Saucier; Professors 
Emeriti: J. M. Parker III, J. L. Stuckey; Associate Professors: N. E. Huang, 
W. H. Spence, A. H. Weber, C. W. Welby; Adjunct Associate Professor: J. R. 
Smith; Associate Professor Emeritus: E. L. Miller Jr.; Assistant Professors: 
M. J. Bartholomew, R. J. Carson III, V. V. Cavaroc Jr., C. E. Knowles, G. F. 
Watson Jr; Adjunct Assistant Professors: W. D. Bach Jr., J. T. Peterson 

The geosciences include all of the overlapping divisions of the physical, chemical 
and biological earth sciences, such as geology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, 
meteorology, oceanography and paleontology. The Department of Geosciences offers 
courses in each of these related disciplines and awards Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science degrees in geology. The undergraduate program in meteorology 
is available as an option through the cooperation of other departments in the 
University. Students in this program are assigned a geosciences adviser in 
meteorology and an adviser in the cooperating department. Degree programs in 
oceanography are at the graduate level only. 

Geology is the professional field in which geological knowledge and techniques 
are focused on the solution of problems concerned with the occurrence, origin 
and distribution of rock and mineral deposits, raw material supplies and with a 
variety of engineering projects. Many of the larger engineering undertakings such 
as the construction of dams and reservoirs, tunnels, buildings and highways depend 
for success in part on an exact knowledge of their geological setting. Discovery, 



214 



evaluation, development and conservation of mineral resources (including fossil 
fuels and ground water) also require the quantitative and analytical application of 
the findings of geological science regarding the constitution, structure and history 
of the earth's crust. The geology curriculum combines training in basic physical 
and engineering sciences with those aspects of geology that are most pertinent to 
human affairs. 

Meteorology is the science of the atmosphere, including the processes and the 
phenomena within the atmosphere, the interactions with earth's land and sea 
surface below and with the solar atmosphere above. Its objectives are the undez - - 
standing of the atmosphere and the complex processes occurring within it and the 
application of this knowledge to benefit mankind in his welfare and various 
endeavors. The meteorology courses offered by the Department of Geosciences are 
designed to provide a basic training for roles in both theoiy and application and 
to prepare the student for either research or the varied pixrfessional applications. 

One of the challenging fields in geoscience is weather modification and control 
to enhance water supplies, decrease lightning hazards, protect crops from storm 
damage and perhaps tame the hurricane and the tornado. The atmosphere has a 
major influence on radio communication, including rocket guidance and control and 
missile detection and interception. The problem of atmospheric pollution needs 
thoughtful, searching attention. 

In the past few years the physical and geological characteristics of the oceans 
have become the subject of major research programs in this and in other countries. 
The Department of Geosciences offers undergraduate and graduate courses in 
geological, meteorological and physical oceanography. 

The theories, instruments and skills needed and developed to study the earth 
can now be applied to investigating the moon and planets. Conversely, improvements 
in the instrumentation achieved to further the study of the planets has long been 
in the domain of astronomy. Now, as instruments reach these other bodies of the 
solar system, the investigation of them merges into the geosciences. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

A graduate in geology may follow one of several broad fields either in the United 
States or in foreign countries: for example, the application of geology to engineering 
work, or, the application of geology in the mineral industries. Geologists are 
currently employed by oil companies and quarrying concerns; exploration com- 
panies, construction firms; railroads, public utilities, banks and insurance com- 
panies; iron, steel and other metal producers; manufacturers using nonmetallic 
raw materials, such as ceramics, cement and abrasives; municipal, state, and 
federal government agencies; schools, colleges, museums and research institutes. 
The southeastern United States offers excellent employment opportunities. There 
is a growing need for the application of geological science to engineering construc- 
tion in connection with highways, foundations, excavations, beach erosion control 
and water supply problems. The mineral industry of the Southeast has expanded 
substantially in the last decade; known deposits in the region — as yet only partially 
developed — include iron, nickel, copper, chromite, molybdenite, feldspar, mica, 
kaolin, kyanite, sillimanite, pyrophyllite, talc, barite, spodumene, sulphur (pyrite), 
coal, phosphate, granite, limestone and marl. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The department offers a graduate program leading to the Master of Science 
degree in geology and, through its participation in the interdisciplinary marine 
sciences program, offers work leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees in marine sciences with specialization in physical oceanography 
and meteorological oceanography. Prospective applicants should consult the 
Graduate School Catalog. 



215 



GEOSCIENCES CURRICULUM 
LEADING TO B.S. DEGREE IN GEOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CH 101 Genera! Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus I 4 

PMS 100 Orientation 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

or 
CH 107 Principles of Chemistiy 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus II 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 



it; 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GY 120 Physical Geology 



Credits 

3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus III 4 

Modern Language 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



English Literature 3 

GY 222 Historical Geology 3 

GY 330 Crystallography & Mineralogy ... 3 
MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I* . . 3 

Modern Language 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistiy** 4 
GY 331 Optical Mineralogy & X-Ray 

Diffraction 4 

GY 351 Tectonic Structures 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Elective 3 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

GY 440 Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology . 4 
GY 452 Exogenic Materials & Processes ... 4 

GY 462 Geological Surveying 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Minor*** 3 



17 



SUMMER SESSION 
GY 465 Geological Field Procedures (or equivalent field camp) 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

GY 323 Paleontology 3 

or 
GY 415 Mineral Exploration & Evaluation 

Human ities — Social Sciences 3 

Minor*** 3 

Electives 6 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

Geology Elective 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Minor*** 3 

Elective 3 

12 
Total Hours for Graduation 129 



* Students electing a minor in statistics may substitute MA 405 for MA 301. 
** Students electing a minor in physical sciences (chemistry) will substitute CH 431 for CH 331 
and will graduate with a minimum of 128 credit hours. 
*** The minor may be in any field closely related to geology, such as engineering science (engineering 
mechanics, materials engineering), statistics, physical science (chemistry. physics, 
meterology), or biological science (botany, genetics, zoology). The minor field should be chosen 
in consultation with the faculty adviser prior to or during the junior year. 



216 



GEOSCIENCES CURRICULUM 
LEADING TO B.A. DEGREE IN GEOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

History* 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Modern Language (Intermediate) 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

History* 3 

Human ities — Social Sciences 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus A 4 

Modern Language (Intermediate) 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

GY 120 Physical Geology 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Literature** 3 

PHI 205 Problems & Types of Philosophy . . 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

GY 222 Historical Geology 3 

GY 330 Crystallography and Mineralogy ... 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Literature** 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

GY 331 Optical Mineralogy & X-Ray GY 440 Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology. 4 

Diffraction 4 GY 452 Exogenic Materials and Processes . 4 

HI 422 Rise of Modern Science PY 212 General Physics 4 

or Elective 3 

PHI 405 Philosophy of Science 3 — 

PY 211 General Physics 4 15 

Elective 3 

14 



Fall Semester 

GY 491 Seminar on Selected Geologic 

Topics 3 

GY 351 Tectonic Structures 3 

Electives 6 

Geology Option*** 3 



15 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits 



Spri)ig Semester Credits 

Geology Option*** 3 

Geology Elective 3 

Electives 6 

12 
Total Hours for Graduation 124 



* Two semesters of history, one in the study of a culture significantly different from our own 
(pre-industrial or non-western societies) and the other of our own or similar cultures (the United 
States or post-industrial western societies, must betaken. 
** To be chosen from ENG 261, 262, 265, 266; ML 301, 302. The literature requirement is a six 
hour sequence in one literary tradition. 
*** GY 323 Paleontology, GY 415 Mineral Exploration and Evaluation, or GY 462 Geological Sur- 
veying will satisfy this requirement. 

MATHEMATICS 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor N. J. Rosk, Head of the Department 

Professor H. V. Park, Associate Head of the Department 
Professor H. M. Nahikian, Assistant to the Head of the Department 
Professor L. S. Winton, In Charge of Undergraduate Advising 
Associate Professor R. E Chandler, Graduate Administration 



217 



Professors: J. W. Bishir, R. C. Bullock, E. E. Burniston, J. M. A. Danby W. J. 
Harrington, K. Koh, J. Levine, P. E. Lewis, J. Luh, P. A. Nickel, H. Sagan, 
H. E. Speece, R. A. Struble, H. R. van der Vaart, O. Wesler, L. S. Winton; 
Adjunct Professor: I. N. Sneddon; Professors Emeriti: J. M. Clarkson, H. A. 
Fisher, H. P. Williams; Associate Professors: H. C. Cooke, W. G. Dotson Jr., 
R. O. Fulp, J. R. Kolb, C. H. Little Jr., J. A. Marlin, A. R. Nolstad, D. M. 
Peterson, H. A. Petrea, J. W. Querry, G. C. Watson, J. B. Wilson; Assistant 
Professors: C. N. Anderson, S. L. Campbell, T. Joyce Caraway, H. J. Charlton, 
D. E. Garoutte, R. Gellar, D. J. Hansen, R. E. Hartwig, Ruth B. Honeycutt, 
J. E. Huneycutt Jr., C. F. Lewis, A. Maltbie, R. H. Martin Jr., C. D. Meyer Jr., 
L. B. Page, C. V. Pao, R. T. Ramsay, R. G. Savage, R. Silber, J. L. Sox Jr., G. S. 
Speidel Jr., E. L. Stitzinger, D. F. Ullrich, W. M. Waters Jr.; Assistant 
Professors Emeriti: V. R. Brantley, R. A. MacKerracher, P. Shahdan; In- 
structors: Dorothy L. Brant, H. L. Crouch Jr., H. L. Davison, T. F. Gordon, 
Carlotta P. Patton, H. Wright 

Mathematics has long played an important role in the intellectual and 
technological history of mankind. However, in recent years there has been a 
dramatic expansion of the knowledge and applications of mathematics. There is 
consequently a demand for people who are well versed in pure or applied mathe- 
matics. 

CURRICULUM 

The undergraduate major in mathematics provides a core of basic courses in 
mathematics together with a program of electives that is sufficiently flexible to 
prepare a student for graduate study in pure or applied mathematics, for careers 
in industry, business or government, or for teaching. A carefully selected set of 
required courses and electives in science, humanities and modern language 
provide a total program that is well adapted to the demands of modern day life. 

Students with a special interest in applied mathematics may take the applied 
mathematics option. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS 

A total of 126 credits distributed as follows: 

Required Mathematics Courses (29 credits) 

MA 102-201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, II 

MA 231 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MA 232 Introduction to Multivariate Calculus 

MA 312 Introduction to Differential Equations 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra 

One semester of probability (MA 214, MA 421. MA 541, ST 421 or ST 371) 

MA 425-426 Mathematical Analysis I, II 

Science Requirements (17-19 hours) 
CSC 111 or CSC 101 
PY 205 and PY 208 
CH 101 
CH 103, 105, or 107 or geoscience or life science 

Required Humanities (15 credits) 
ENG 111, 112 
Literature — one semester 
Introductory history — one semester 
Modern language at 200 level — one semester 

Physical Education (U credits) 



218 



Technical Electives (21 credits) 

These must include at least nine credits of mathematics at 400-500 level and at 
least nine credits in technical offerings other than mathematics. 

Humanities and Social Science Electives (18 credits) 
At least six credits must be a junior-senior level 

Free Electives (20-22 credits) 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS OPTION 

The requirements are the same as above except for the technical electives. For 
this option the 21 credits of technical electives must include MA 430, Introduction 
to Applied Mathematics, at least one mathematics elective at the 400-500 level and 
at least 12 credits in depth from technical offerings other than mathematics. 

SAMPLE PROGRAM IN MATHEMATICS 

(Includes the Applied Mathematics Option.) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I . . 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Introductory History 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II . 4 
CH 105 Chemistry Principles and 

Applications 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming .... 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 231 Introduction to Linear Algebra ... 3 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Literature 3 

Modern Language 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Spriyig Semester Credits 

MA 232 Introduction to Multivariate 

Calculus 3 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra . . 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Free Electives 6 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Fall Semester 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I 3 

MA 312 Introduction to Differential 

Equations 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Technical Elective 3 

Free Electives 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 

MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II 3 

Probability 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Technical Electives 6 



15 



15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Technical Electives* 9 

Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

Technical Electives 9 

Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



15 



* One of these must be MA 430 for the applied mathematics option 

GRADUATE STUDY 

Graduate programs are offered at both the masters and doctoral levels. The core 
of basic courses in algebra, modern analysis and applied mathematics are re- 
quired of all students. The remaining program is quite flexible. The large variety 



219 



of course offerings in the department in conjunction with the many other scientific 
and engineering departments allow for any desired degree of emphasis in either 
pure or applied mathematics. 

PHYSICS 

Professor L. W. Seagondollar, Head of the Department 

Professor J. T. Lynn, Graduate Administrator and Assistant to the Head of the 
Department 

Professors: W. H. Bennett, J. M. A. Danby, W. R. Davis, W. 0. Doggett, G. L. 
Hall, A. W. Jenkins Jr., H. C. Kelly, E. R. Manring, J. D. Memory, A. C. 
Menius Jr., R. L. Murray, D. L. Ridgeway, D. R. Tilley, A. W. Waltner; 
Professors Emeriti: F. W. Lancaster, J. S. Meares; Associate Professors: 
G. C. Cobb Jr., G. H. Katzin, D. H. Martin, G. E. Mitchell, M. K. Moss, J. Y. 
Park, R. R. Patty; Assistant Professors: K. T. Chung, R. E. Fornes, C. R. 
Gould, F. Lado Jr., G. W. Parker III, J. F. Schetzina; Assistant Professor 
Emeritus: E. J. Brown; Instructor: H. L. Owen; Instructor Emeritus: Minnie 
W. C. Harris 

Physics is a fundamental science of observations, measurements and the 
mathematical description of the particles and processes of nature. In addition to 
extending our basic knowledge of the universe, the science of physics provides the 
means for attacking problems of importance in modern technology. The variety of 
the contributions made by physicists is indicated by activities such as the discovery 
of new particles of nature, the invention and use of new instruments to probe 
interplanetary space, the study of processes fundamental to the release of 
thermonuclear energy, the development of lasers and solid state devices, and 
research on missiles, satellites and space craft. 

PROGRAMS 

The Physics Department provides at both the graduate and undergraduate levels 
programs of study in fundamental physics and in several areas of specialization, 
including relativity theory, nuclear physics, plasma physics, infrared spectroscopy, 
magnetic resonance, atmospheric physics, solid state physics and lasers. 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDY 

The undergraduate curriculum in physics provides the basic training for a 
career in physics or for graduate study 

PHYSICS CURRICULUM 

freshman year 



Fall Semester Credits 

PMS 100 Orientation 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I . . 4 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

PY 201 General Physics 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & Calculus 114 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

English Elective 3 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 4 

Modern Language 3 

PY 202 General I'hysi.-s 4 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

Modern Language 3 

PY 203 General Physics 4 

PY 413 Thermal Physics 3 

Physical Education 1 



is 



220 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II 3 Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

PY 411 Mechanics I 3 Mathematics Elective 3 

PY 414 Electricity & Magnetism I 3 PY 412 Mechanics II 3 

PY 451 Intermediate Experiments in PY 415 Electricity & Magnetism II 3 

Physics I 2 PY 452 Intermediate Experiments in 

Free Elective 3 Physics II 2 

Free Elective 3 

17 



M 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities — Social Sciences 3 Humanities — Social Sciences 3 

Mathematics Elective 3 PY 402 Modern & Quantum Physics II .... 3 

PY 401 Modern & Quantum Physics I 3 PY 409 Ion & Electron Physics 3 

PY 416 Physical Optics 3 PY 410 Nuclear Physics I 4 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

15 16 

Total Hours for Graduation 128 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Physics offers the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy- 
degrees. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



STATISTICS 

Cox Hall 

Professor D. D. Mason, Head of the Department 

Professor R. G. D. Steel, Graduate Administrator 

Professor F. E. McVay, Undergraduate Administrator 

Professors: C. C. Cockerham, A. H. E. Grandage, R. J. Hader, D. W. Hayne, 
H. L. Lucas Jr., R. J. Monroe, L. A. Nelson, C. H. Proctor, C. P. Quesen- 

BERRY, J. O. RAWLINGS, D. L. RlDGEWAY, J. A. RlGNEY, H. R. VAN DER VAART, 

T. D. Wallace, O. Wesler; Adjunct Professors: A. L. Finkner, D. G. Hor- 
vitz, J. T. Wakeley; Professor Emeritus: Gertrude M. Cox; Associate 
Professors: B. B. Bhattacharyya, F. G. Giesbrecht, H. J. Gold, M. M. 
Goodman, W. L. Hafley, A. R. Manson, B. F. Swindel (USFS), J. L. Wasik; 
Assistant Professors: A. R. Gallant, T. M. Gerig, A. C. Linnerud, Mary B. 
Williams; Adjunct Assistant Professors: D. L. Bayless, H. T. Schreuder; 
Instructor: Jolayne W. Service; Senior Research Technologist: F. J. Verlinden; 
Research Associate Technologist: A. J. Barr; Research Assistant Technologist: 
J. L. Christopher; Research Associates: A. Angelone, J. Graham; Associate 
Statisticians: H. K. Hamann, B. J. Stines; Assistant Statisticians: P. H. 
Geissler, J. H. Goodnight, H. J. Kirk, D. W. Turner, F. T. Wang 

Statistics is the body of scientific methodology which deals with the logic of 
experiment and survey design, the efficient collection and presentation of quantita- 
tive information and the formulation of valid and reliable inferences from sample 
data. 

The Department of Statistics in Raleigh is part of the Institute of Statistics 
which includes a Department of Biostatistics and a Department of Statistics at 
Chapel Hill. The Department of Statistics provides instruction, consultation and 
computational services on research projects for other departments of all schools 
at North Carolina State University including the Agricultural Experiment Station; 
the department staff are also engaged in an extensive program of research in 
statistical theory and methodology. This wide range of activities furnishes 

221 



professional environment for training students in the use of statistical procedures 
in such fields as the physical, biological and social sciences, and in industrial 
research and development. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The graduate in statistics will find abundant employment opportunities that 
will be intellectually and financially rewarding. The importance of sound statistical 
thinking in the design and analysis of quantitative studies is generally recognized. 
Industry relies on statistical methods to control the quality of goods in the process 
of manufacture and to determine the acceptability of goods produced. Statistical 
procedures based on scientific sampling have become basic tools in such diverse 
fields as weather forecasting, opinion polling, crop and livestock estimation and 
business trend prediction. Because he can improve the efficiency of use of increas- 
ingly complex and expensive experimental and survey data, the statistician will 
continue to be in demand wherever quantitative studies are conducted. 

TYPICAL STATISTICS CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



Fall Semester 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I . 4 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming . . 3 

Physical Education 1 

PMS 100 Orientation 



15 



Credits 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II. 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ST 371 Introduction to Probability and 

Statistics 4 

MA 231 Introduction to Linear Algebra ... 3 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

EC 205 Economic Activity 3 

Physical Education 1 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

MA 232 Introduction to Multivariate 

Calculus 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

EC 206 The Price System 3 

Major Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Credits 



Fall Semester 

ST 421 Introduction to Mathematical 

Statistics 3 

Major Elective 3 

Modern Language 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Biological Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



18 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ST 422 Introduction to Mathematical 

Statistics 3 

Major Elective 3 

Modern Language 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ST 501 Basic Statistical Analysis 3 

Major Elective 3 

ENG 321 The Communication of Technical 

Information 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



15 



Spring Semester Credits 

ST 502 Basic Statistical Analysis 3 

Major Elective 3 

SP 231 Expository Speaking 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 
Total Credits for Graduation 126 



222 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Statistics offers work leading to the Master of Science, Master 
of Statistics (non-thesis) and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The department also 
offers degrees in biomathematics: Master of Science, Master of Biomathematics 
(a non-thesis degree) and Doctor of Philosophy in Biomathematics. Prospective 
applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 



223 




224 



TEXTILES 

Nelson Textile Building 

David W. Chanky, Dean 

W. E. Smith, Assistant to the Dean for Student Services 

M. L. Robinson Jr., Academic Coordinator 

Textiles is broader than the name implies. It covers almost every aspect of our 
daily lives — with applications in medicine, in space, in recreation and sports, in 
personal safety, in environmental improvement and control, in transportation and 
in household and apparel uses. These versatile materials — textiles — are made to 
exacting design specifications by a wide variety of modern high-speed processes, 
utilizing various tools such as lasers, electronics and computers. Textiles begins 
with the synthesis of fibers by man or by nature; it carries through a myriad 
selection of processes for fabric formation, including the steps necessary to make 
fabrics useful, such as the manufacture of dyestuffs and coloring, chemical auxiliaries 
and finishes, cutting and fashioning into end-use products. 

The approximately 4,500 graduates of the School of Textiles enjoy enviable 
positions in North Carolina, where the majority of them now live. They hold im- 
portant occupations in the textile and related industries, ranging from manufacturing 
management, sales, corporate management, designing and styling, research develop- 
ment and technical service to quality control and personnel management. In 
these positions textile graduates are involved in the creative and management 
decision-making aspects of the industry. They plan the flow of materials and 
machines. They create new products and processes. They solve product and process 
problems. They create styles, designs, patterns, colors, textures, and structures 
for apparel, home and industrial uses. They engineer the systems and products 
required of industrial, space, medical, apparel and other uses of textile products. 
They deal with computers, automation, product quality, plant performance and 
environmental problems. They manage large and small companies, personnel, 
and systems. Most important they are leading citizens contributing not only to the 
individual company, but to the development and well-being of the communities in 
which they live. 

The School of Textiles prepares young men and women for careers in any of 
the above occupations. A broad background is stressed, with as much as two- 
thirds of the educational program comi"^ from the broad resources of the University 
outside the school. Opportunities today remain excellent, with the School main- 
taining one of the best placement records in the University. Demand for tex- 
tile graduates from North Carolina State University is particularly strong, 
due in part to the strength of the academic programs offered. These programs are 
organized in two departments: textile technology and textile chemistry. 

CURRICULA 

The School of Textiles offers a broad curricula choice depending upon the 
interests of the individual student. Terminal Bachelor of Science programs in 
textile technology or in textile chemistry permit the broadest choice of courses in 
addition to the core courses that are required. For example, a student may 
specialize in yarn or fabric structures, in textile economics and marketing or 
fabric styling and design. The student's curriculum will include choices in the 



225 



humanities, social sciences and basic sciences and, according to the emphasis he 
chooses, may result in a minor in economics, industrial engineering, languages, 
mathematics, physics, political science, statistics or textile chemistry (or technology). 
The structure of the minor sequence of courses may be such that a student can 
proceed to graduate study in either the minor field or in textile chemistry or 
technology. Alternatively it is possible, with only one summer of extra work, to 
obtain a double degree, for example in textile technology and textile chemistry. 

Curricula leading to graduate study, particularly to Doctor of Philosophy 
programs such as that offered by the School of Textiles in fiber and polymer 
science, differ from those of terminal Bachelor of Science programs primarily in 
the junior and senior year. While considerable latitude is still possible, there are a 
number of prescribed courses that must be taken. The nature of these will depend 
upon the type of graduate study anticipated. 

Textile chemistry is designed to give the student fundamental education in 
chemistry with special emphasis on the application of this science to textiles. The 
textile chemistry curriculum places emphasis on chemical fundamentals so that 
those students who complete the program with a high degree of excellence are ade- 
quately prepared for graduate study either in pure or applied chemistry. 
Similarly, students who complete the program in any of the minors in textile 
technology with a high degree of excellence would be acceptable for graduate study 
in numerous areas. 

Inasmuch as the professional work in textiles is concentrated to a great extent 
in the last two years of the student's program, it is possible for students from 
either junior or community colleges or other institutions of higher learning 
to transfer to the School of Textiles with a minimum loss of time. 

INSPECTION TRIPS 

For certain of the textile courses offered, it is desirable for the student to see 
the manufacturing process under actual operating conditions. When possible 
trips are arranged for student groups to visit outstanding manufacturing plants. 
Participation in the trips is required: transportation costs and other travel 
expenses, while held to a minimum insofar as possible, must be paid by the 
student. 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

Job opportunities for summer employment are available for textile students. 
Placement assistance is available through the school placement office and 
frequently can be arranged in the student's home community. Qualified students 
may arrange to receive academic credit of up to three hours for faculty-approved 
summer jobs. Usually this will be for one summer period only, and usually at the 
end of the junior year. 

DEGREES 

Upon completion of programs in either textile technology or textile chemistry, 
the degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred. 

The School of Textiles offers the following degrees: Bachelor of Science in tex- 
tile technology or textile chemistry; Master of Textile Technology; Master of Science 
in textile technology or textile chemistry; and Doctor of Philosophy in fiber and 
polymer science. For general requirements for graduate degrees, consult the 
Graduate School Catalog. 

By mutual agreement between the faculties involved, candidates for the Doctor 
of Philosophy degree in other schools of this institution may specialize in essen- 
tially textile-related subjects. In such cases, it is often logical for the research 
involved to be done in the School of Textiles. 



226 



THE FOUR-ONE PROGRAM 

The School of Textiles has developed a program designed to permit the student 
with a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university to complete 
the requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree in textile technology or textile 
chemistry after the satisfactory completion of one year of study. 

Students entering this program should have completed mathematics, physics 
and chemistry comparable to that required in the basic textile technology or 
textile chemistry curriculum. Presuming these conditions are met, the student can 
complete the degree requirements in two regular semesters and summer school. 
Students not meeting the minimum requirements in the sciences or applied mathe- 
matics could remove deficiencies in the summer session prior to the fall semester, 
allowing completion of studies at the end of the normal period or in the following 
summer sessions. 

The undergraduate program of each applicant is considered individually and, in 
general, a complete transfer of credits is possible. 

FACILITIES 

The Nelson Textile Building, erected in 1939 and greatly enlarged in 1950, was 
designed to coordinate teaching and laboratory facilities. It houses one of the most 
modern and best-equipped textile institutions in the wOrld. The Department of 
Textile Chemistry is housed in the Clark Laboratories, located south of the Nelson 
Textile Building. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Technological advances in textile fibers and manufacturing techniques have 
created a tremendous demand for persons educated in textile colleges. For the 
past several years, the School of Textiles has had a demand for more graduates 
than it could supply. Its graduates have entered the textile industry at salaries 
equal to or better than those offered in any other industry. 

Graduates of the school are equipped to enter the many expanding activities 
of the textile field, and alumni of the school hold responsible positions in the 
general areas of manufacturing, marketing, research and administration. Many are 
now plant managers, presidents and other top-level executives. 

To assist in the placement of students and alumni and to facilitate interviews by 
textile firms, the school maintains a fulltime director of student affairs and place- 
ment. 



TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

David Clark Laboratories 

Professor H. A. Rutherford, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor R. McGregor, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: K. S. Campbell, D. M. Cates, R. D. Gilbert, G. Goldfinger, R. W. 
Work; Adjunct Professors: A. E. Davis Jr., H. F. Mark, A. M. Sookne; Associate 
Professors: J. A. Cuculo, T. H. Guion, W. K. Walsh; Assistant Professors: 
C. D. Livengood, M. H. Theil; Associate Professor Emeritus: A. C. Hayes; 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: K. K. Ghosh, L. A. Graham, W. R. Martin Jr., 
Research Associate: C. E. Bryan 

The field of textile chemistry embraces a number of disciplines and is concerned, 
in part, with those industrial processes that constitute the final steps in the pre- 
paration of textile materials for the consumer. Common terms applied to these 
processes are scouring, bleaching, printing, dyeing and finishing. Textile 
chemistry is also concerned with fiber-forming polymers, both natural and 
man-made, and how the chemical and physical properties of such materials vary 

227 



with fiber structure. The purpose of the department is to provide students with a 
fundamental knowledge of the underlying principles that relate to this derivative 
field and a perspective that includes the many interacting factors involved in the 
preparation and conversion of polymeric materials to useful products. 

CURRICULA 

The department has two curricula, referred to below as Programs "A" and "B". 
"A" is specifically designed for those students who wish to take an advanced 
degree in fiber and polymer science. "B" is oriented toward a terminal Bachelor 
of Science degree. However, pursual of "B" by the undergraduate does not mitigate 
against the student entering a graduate program; by proper choice of electives 
beginning in the junior year a student may terminate program "B" with essentially 
the same background as one who takes "A" from the start. 

The essential difference between the two is that "A" requires more mathematics, 
chemistry and textile chemistry than "B". The course sequences required are 
described in footnotes after each program. 

Although not indicated specifically in the curricula outlines which follow, the 
student may choose a minor in a number of different disciplines. Choice of course 
material is flexible and is made in consultation with the student's adviser. More- 
over, through the proper choice of electives a student may in a four-year period 
complete the requirements for two degrees: textile chemistry and textile 
technology; textile chemistry and chemistry; and textile chemistiy and mathematics. 
Other combinations are possible, but may require a fifth year of study. 

FACILITIES 

Located in the David Clark Laboratories are departmental offices, classrooms, 
laboratories and pilot facilities for instruction and research. The departmental 
radiation laboratory is located in the Nelson Building. Radiation facilities include 
a Cobalt 60 source and a 500 KV Electron Accelerator. 

Equipment is available for ultra-violet, visible, infrared, nmr and esr spectro- 
scopy, reflectometry, colorimetry, viscometry, chromotography, differential thermal 
analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, instru- 
mental measurement of color and computer color matching. Common testing 
equipment used for the evaluation of the physical properties of textile materials 
and for determining the color-fastness, wash-fastness, etc., of fibers and fabrics is 
also available. Complete pilot plant facilities are available for demonstration of 
all wet-processing operatons used in the field of textiles. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

PROGRAM A 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

T 101H Fundamentals of Textiles 2 TC 203 Fiber Science I 3 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & MA 201 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus I 4 Calculus II 4 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

14 15 



228 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

TC 303 Textile Chemistry I 2 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus III 4 

TX 220 Yarn Forming Systems 4 

(orTX 250) 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education (if required) 1 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC 304 Textile Chemistry II 2 

T 305 Introduction to Color Science 1 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

MA 301 Applied Differential 

Equations I 3 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education (if required) 1 

18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



TC 461 Chemistry of Fibers 3 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

TX 250 Fabric Forming Systems 4 

(orTX 220) 
Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 



18 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC 412 Textile Chemical 

Analysis II 3 

ST 361 or CSC 101 (or CSC 111) 2 or 3 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 6 



14-15 



Fall Semester 

TC 403 Textile Chemical Technology 3 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 
TC 404 Textile Chemical Technology 3 



TC 405 Textile Chemical 

Technology Laboratory 2 

Textile Chemistry Elective** 3 or 4 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



1' 



TC 406 Textile Chemical 

Technology Laboratory 2 

TC 491 Seminar in Textile Chemistry 1 

TC Elective** 3 or 4 

Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



Total Hours for Graduation 



15 or 16 
130 



**TC 561 Organic Chemistry of High Polymers 

**TC 562 (CH 562) Physical Chemistiy of High Polymer: 

**TC 505 Theory of Dyeing 

**T-492 Problems in Science and Technology 

**TC 401 The Textile Industry and the Environment 

**T 506 Color Science 



-Bulk Properties 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

PROGRAM B 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



T 101H Fundamentals of Textiles 2 

ENG 111 Composition & Reading 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus I* 4 

or 
MA 112 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus A 4 

Physical Education 1 



11 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC 203 Fiber Science I 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus II 4 

or 
MA 212 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus B 3 

Physical Education 1 

14 or 15 



229 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



TC 303 Textile Chemistry I 2 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus III 4 

or 
MA 114 Topics in Modern 

Mathematics 3 

TX 220 Yarn Forming Systems 4 

(or TX 250) 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education (if required) 1 



16-18 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC 304 Textile Chemistry II 2 

T 305 Introduction to Color Science 1 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

PY 205 General Physics** 4 

or 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

Humanity or Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education (if required) 1 



14-15 



Fall Semester 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



TC 461 (CH 461) Chemistry of Fibers 3 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

or 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

TX 250 Fabric Forming Systems 4 

(orTX 220) 

Humanity or Social Science Elective 3 



Credits 



TC 412 Textile Chemistry Analysis II 3 

ST 361 or CSC 101 (or CSC 111) 2 or 3 

Elective from Schedule A 4 

Humanity or Social Science Elective 6 



15-16 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

TC 403 Textile Chemical 

Technology 3 

TC 405 Textile Chemistry 

Technology Laboratory 2 

Textile Chemistry Elective*** 3 or 4 

Elective from Schedule A 3 

Humanity or Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 



17-18 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC 404 Textile Chemical Technology 3 

TC 406 Textile Chemistry 

Technology Laboratory 2 

TC 491 Seminar in Textile Chemistry 1 

Textile Chemistry Elective*** 6 

Humanity or Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

18 
Hours for Graduation 129 



*One of the following mathematics sequences is required: MA 114, MA 112, and MA 212 or 

MA 102, MA 201, and MA 202. 
►♦One of the following physics sequences is required: PY 211 and PY 212, or PY 205 and PY 208 



'*Textile chemistry electives include: 
***TC 561 Organic Chemistry of Polymers 
***TC 562 (CH 562) Physical Chemistry of Polymers 
***TC 505 Theory of Dyeing 
***T-492 Problems in Science and Technology 
***TC 401 The Textile Industry and the Environment 
***T 506 Color Science 



-Bulk Properties 



Program B Sequences 

Schedule A comprises a two-course sequence totaling six semester hours. The 
sequence selected by the student must meet the approval of his adviser. One of the 
following sequences must be elected: 



TX 431 Special Topics in Testing 3 

TX 530 Textile Quality Control 3 

6 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 



PY 411 Mechanics I 3 

PY 412 Mechanics II 3 

6 

MA 511 Advanced Calculus I 3 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II 3 



6 



230 



CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry . . 4 

and choice of: 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I . . 3 

CH 441 Colloid Chemistry 3 

CHE 569 Polymers, Surfactants & 

Colloidal Materials 3 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Textile Chemistry offers a master's degree in textile chem- 
istry. Prospective applicants should consult the Graduate School Catalog. 

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY 

Nelson Textile Building 

Professor J. F. Bogdan, Head of the Department 

Professors: D. S. Hamby, S. P. Hersh, J. A. Porter Jr.; Professors Emeriti: E. B. 
Grover, J. T. Hilton, W. E. Shinn; Associate Professors: E. H. Bradford, 
A. H. El-Shiekh, T. W. George, J. W. Klibbe, P. R. Lord, W. K. Lynch, W. E. 
Moser, J. E. Pardue, T. G. Rochow, W. C. Stuckey Jr.; Adjunct Associate 
Professor: V. F. Holland; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. G. Lewis; 
Assistant Professors: P. Brown, W. D. Cooper, R. E. Fornes, B. S. Gupta, 
E. E. Hutchison, Frances W. Massey, H. M. Middleton Jr., D. M. Powell, 
M. L. Robinson Jr.; Adjunct Assistant Professor: D. H. Black; Assistant 
Professor Emeritus: A. J. Woodbury; Research Instructor: P. L. Grady; Instruc- 
tor: P. A. Tucker Jr. 

The purpose of the Textile Technology Department is to instruct students in the 
theory and fundamental concepts of fiber properties and fiber processing into yarns 
and fabrics. This is accomplished through the systematic study of the basic 
properties of both the materials being processed and of the process involved. The 
department is engaged in research, with the support coming from University funds 
and from industrial and governmental sponsors. Not only faculty, but graduate and 
undergraduate students are encouraged to participate in the research program. 

CURRICULUM 

The curriculum, during the student's first two years, is concerned primarily with 
the physical sciences, humanities and social sciences, with limited but important 
basic studies in textile fundamentals. Following this phase of work, the student in 
his junior and senior year does his or her major work in textiles. 

The primary objective of the textile technology curriculum is to provide as 
general an education as possible and at the same time to prepare the graduate for 
a profitable and rewarding career in the textile industry. This is accomplished 
through an integration of the physical and social sciences and the application of 
these sciences and economics to the field of textiles. 

In addition to the wide selection of sciences, the student also has the opportunity 
for diversification within the School of Textiles. The curriculum offers depth in such 
selected areas as fiber and yarn technology, fabric technology, knitting technology, 
general textiles and textile management. 

OPTIONS 

For a student to develop a second field of interest, the Department of Textile 
Technology offers, in addition to the major field of study, an opportunity for the 
selection of an option from a discipline outside the department. The student may, 
however, select to do most of his work in textile technology. 

These options add two facets to the student's possible growth. Not only can 
strength be developed in a second discipline, but upon completion of the under- 

231 



graduate work, one may pursue a graduate program of study in textiles or in the 
discipline selected as the option. 

Selection of the option can, in most cases, be delayed until the first semester of 
the junior year. This permits the student time to determine which field holds the 
greatest interest. This timing is also appropriate for the transfer student from both 
the North Carolina State University campus and from other schools such as the 
community colleges since most or all of the work in the other school can be applied 
to the requirements of the first two years of study in the department. If the transfer 
student has completed two full years at another institution, the amount of prere- 
quisite work is minimized, since the majority of the major and minor studies are 
concentrated in the junior and senior years. 

FACILITIES 

The facilities of the Department of Textile Technology are subdivided into 
laboratory areas for processing of short staple fibers, long staple synthetic fibers, 
throwing and texturizing continuous filament yarns. Too, laboratories for the study 
of the formation of woven, knitted and nonwoven fabrics including tufting and yarn 
preparation systems are available. The knitting laboratories include a hosiery 
section, circular and double knitting, warp and flat knitting, and knit goods 
finishing. The department has extensive facilities for physical testing of fibers, 
yarns and fabrics. A textile physics laboratory includes equipment designed for 
specialized problems related to textiles. 

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 



CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

MA 111 Algebra & Trigonometry* 4 

T 101 Fundamentals of Textiles 2 

Physical Education 1 



17 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 
CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 



CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus A 4 

TX 220 Yarn Forming Systems 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I** 2 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry & 

Calculus B 3 

TC 203 Fiber Science I 3 

TX 250 Fabric Forming Systems 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Spring Semester 



Credits 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 

PY 211 General Physics 4 

TX 211 Fiber Science II 3 

TX 320 Design & Control of 

Staple Yarn Systems 5 

Physical Education 1 



16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 

PY 212 General Physics 4 

ST 316H Introduction to Statistics 

for Engineers I 3 

TC 301 Technology of Dyeing & 

Finishing 4 

TX 340 Principles of Knitted 

Fabric Structures 5 



16 



Spring Semester 

TX 350 Woven Fabric Structures 
TX 380 Management & Control of 

Textile Systems 

TX 460 Physical Properties of 

Textile Fibers 
or 

TX 560 Structural & Physical 

Properties of Fibers 

Option Hours 

(Programs A. B, C) 

Free Elective 



Credits 
5 



232 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanity-Social Science Elective 3 Humanity-Social Science Elective 6 

TX 330 Textile Measurement & Option Hours 

Quality Control 4 (Programs A, B, C) 6 

Option Hours Free Elective 4 

(Programs A. B, C) 6 — 

Free Elective 3 16 

Total Hours for Graduation 130 

16 



*MA 114 may, under certain circumstances, be substituted for MA 111. For students qualifying the 
mathematics sequence shall be MA 102, Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, MA 201, Analytic 
Geometry and Calculus II, MA 202, Analytic Geometry and Calculus III. 
**Optional. 

Eighteen credit hours of humanity-social science electives are required. These 18 
hours are to include three credit hours of English and EC 206. When practical, 
students are encouraged to take a minimum of two courses in the areas chosen to 
fulfill the humanity-social science requirement. The choice of course sequence and 
scheduling will be planned by the faculty adviser and the student. 

PROGRAM A 

Program A is designed for the student interested in pursuing advanced studies 
in the basic and applied sciences. The textile courses in the option emphasize the 
physics and mechanics of textile structures and materials. The program is ideally 
suited for, but not limited to, those interested in pursuing graduate studies in the 
Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy programs. The actual sequence of courses 
constituting the 15 hours in the option would be selected based upon the interest of 
the student with the approval of the faculty adviser. Typical courses from which 
the option may be structured are: MA 301, MA 511, EM 301, PY 411, PY 412, 
PY 413, T 500, TC 461, TX 465, TX 561. The student would be expected to select at 
least six hours of 400 or 500 level textile courses. 

PROGRAM B 

Program B, consisting of 15 hours, is based upon a background in basic economics 
and is designed to develop an understanding of management control systems, 
decision-making theories and marketing and distribution systems. Six hours of 
course work must be selected from EC 260, EC 420, EC 407, EC 426, EC 431, 
EC 432. Required courses in the option are TX 480, TX 482 and TX 484. 

PROGRAM C 

Program C provides an opportunity for students to elect advanced courses of 
study in the field of textiles. These courses may be selected from the elective 
offerings by the department and may be used to develop in depth study in knitting, 
yarn forming systems, fabric forming systems, quality control or combinations of 
these areas. 

For those students interested in developing a sequence of courses in a discipline 
outside the Department of Textile Technology, these 15 hours may be used in whole 
or in part for courses in computer science, mathematics, physics, industrial engi- 
neering, textile chemistry and statistics. The sequence of courses comprising the 
program of study will be planned by the student and faculty adviser. 

Those textile technology students interested in a sequence of courses in textile 
chemistry are encouraged to develop a program that will lead to a dual degree in 
textile technology and textile chemistry. 

233 



TYPICAL PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE FOUR-ONE 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 
AND TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY 



TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 



TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY 



TC 203 
TX 220 



SUMMER SESSIONS 

First Session 
Credits 



Fiber Science I 3 

Yarn Forming Systems 4 



Credits 

TC 203 Fiber Science I 3 

TX 220 Yarn Forming Systems 4 



TX 250 Fabric Forming Systems 



Second Sessioyi 
Credits 
4 



TX 211 
TX 250 



Fiber Science II 

Fabric Forming Systems 



Credits 

3 

4 



FALL SEMESTER 
Credits 



TC 403 Textile Chemistry Technology 3 

TC 405 Textile Chemistry 

Technology Laboratory 2 

TC 461 (CH 461) Chemistry of Fibers 3 

Textile Chemistry Elective* 3 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics 

for Engineers I 3 

or 
CSC 101 Introduction to Programming .... 3 

or 
CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages 2 



ST 361 Introduction to Statistics 
for Engineers I 

TX 320 Design & Control of 

Staple Yarn Systems 

TX 340 Principles of Knitted 

Fabric Structures 

TX 350 Woven Fabric Structures 



Credits 

3 

5 



is 



SPRING SEMESTER 
Credits 



CH 331 Introductory Physical 

Chemistry 4 

TC 404 Textile Chemistry Technology 3 

TC 406 Textile Chemistry 

Technology Laboratory 2 

TC 412 Textile Chemistry Analysis II 3 

TC 491 Seminar in Textile Chemistry 1 

Textile Chemistry Elective* 3 



16 



TC 301 Technology of Dyeing & 

Finishing 

TX 330 Textile Measurement & 

Quality Control 

TX 380 Management & Control of 

Textile Systems 

TX 460 Physical Properties of 

Textile Fibers 



Credits 

4 

4 

3 

3 

14 



*May be chosen from T 506, Color Science: TC 401, The Textile Industry and the Environment; 
TC 504, Fiber Formation — Theory and Practice; TC 505, Theory of Dyeing; TC 561, Organic 
Chemistry of High Polymers; TC 562 (CH 562), Physical Chemistry of High Polymers — Bulk 
Properties; TC 569 (CHE 569), Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. 

Students completing this program may continue to the graduate level if scholastic 
average is suitable. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Textile Technology offers the Master of Science and the 
Master of Textile Technology degrees. Prospective applicants should consult the 
Graduate School Catalog. 



234 



TEXTILE RESEARCH 

Morton R. Shaw, Assistant Dean for Research 

An examination of the nature of the research conducted in the School of Textiles 
during the last decade reveals a pattern of change as the needs of the educational 
program and the textile industry itself have changed. Emphasis has swung be- 
tween basic and applied research as well as between chemical and technology 
orientation. Interdisciplinary research conducted on a team basis has become of 
importance as problems have become more complex and the techniques of con- 
ducting joint research are learned. Such type of research provides the learning 
experiences for those students who will be entering industry where team research 
predominates. Such research covers a wide gamut of problems having to do with 
textiles, fibers, and polymers. 



TEXTILES EXTENSION AND CONTINUING 
EDUCATION PROGRAM 

D. S. Hamby, Director 

William H. Hard, Assistant to the Director 

The extension and continuing education program of the School of Textiles is 
designed to serve the needs of the textile industry by disseminating research find- 
ings and offering short courses for executive and scientific personnel in the 
industry. 

The extension phase of the program is intended to provide a closer liaison with 
the textile industry. It currently has several objectives. One is to offer courses 
off campus for academic credit. Such courses are given when and where there is a 
sufficient demand. Another objective is to administer programs in which textile 
students are involved off campus, for example summer jobs, in industry for which 
credit is given. A third objective is to transmit new research findings and other 
valuable information to the textile industry. 

The continuing education activities of the school range from seminars to two- 
week short courses. They range in scope from the highly scientific to the more 
practical level. A number of these courses are offered on a regular schedule while 
others are arranged as the need arises. 



MACHINE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT 

Paul D. Emerson, Head 

C. M. Asbill Jr., Professor Emeritus 

Engineering assistance to faculty and students of the School of Textiles is pro- 
vided by Machine Design and Development. This function includes textile engineer- 
ing aspects of fiber production and processing, textiles manufacturing and testing, 
and mechanical and electronic instrumentation, as well as textile machinery design 
and development. 

Complete facilities are available for design, construction and evaluation of 
experimental or developmental textile equipment. 

Assistance to industry is provided in the form of consultation on matters relating 
to textile engineering, particularly in the field of noise measurement and control. 
The department also endeavors to remain current with recent engineering advances 
applicable to textiles and maintains active liaison with industry and the scientific 
community. 



235 



OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES 

William E. Smith, Director 

The Office of Student Services is responsible for the placement and financial aid 
programs of the School of Textiles. The placement function makes available to a 
potential employer the credentials of our students for permanent and summer 
employment and in a great number of cases performs equally for alumni. 

The financial aid function operates by committee and makes it possible for any 
North Carolina student to pursue an education in textiles through scholarships, 
loans or grants as long as he or she maintains the academic and moral standards 
of the University. 

The office is also responsible for representing the School of Textiles to the high 
schools in North Carolina through participating in the North Carolina Guidance 
and Personnel Association. 

The director of the Office of Student Services is a member of the Executive 
Committee of the School of Textiles and is, to a great extent, the liaison between 
the student body and the student government with the administration of the school. 

In general, it is the bridge between the academic and the extracurricular 
activities for the students. 

BURLINGTON TEXTILES LIBRARY 

J. G. Baker, Librarian 

The School of Textiles library was originally organized in 1944 as a branch of 
the D. H. Hill Library. In 1951, as a result of a substantial gift by Burlington 
Mills Foundation, the library was relocated in the west wing of the Nelson Build- 
ing, and in 1965 the library was expanded, doubling the original space. This 
expansion was again made possible through Burlington Industries, Inc. 

Attractive furnishings and air-conditioning create an area conducive to study 
and research. The library has individual study carrels, a reading lounge, a 
reference/bibliography area and a seminar room. More shelving and storage have 
been provided for an ever-growing collection of textile books, journals, trade 
catalogs, patents and pamphlets. Typing facilities for students and photocopy 
services for users of the collection are available. 

The library subscribes to various commercial indexing/abstracting services 
including Chemical Abstracts, Textile Technology Digest and World Textile 
Abstracts. 

The library lends to students, faculty and research staff of the institution, and 
will also lend to textile industry personnel. Interlibrary loan services are available 
to other institutions. "Literature searching" within reasonable limits is performed 
for qualified persons. 



236 



UNIVERSITY STUDIES 

Harrelson Hall 

Professor Albert Carnesale, Head 

Professor: John R. Lambert Jr.; Associate Professor: J. C. Wallace; Assistant 
Professor: R. M. Cornish; Instructors: R. L. Hoffman, C. L. Stalnaker 

University Studies is an academic unit offering courses that are problem- or 
issue-oriented and that are taught in an interdisciplinary format. Courses are 
open without course prerequisites to students in all curricula. In addition to a 
permanent teaching staff, faculty is drawn from the academic disciplines directly 
concerned with the problems or issues under consideration. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Walter J. Peterson, Dean 

Graduate instruction at North Carolina State University is organized to provide 
opportunity and facilities for advanced study and research in the fields of agri- 
culture and life sciences, architecture, design, engineering, forestry, certain disci- 
plines in the School of Liberal Arts, physical and mathematical sciences, tech- 
nological education and textiles. The purpose of these graduate programs is to 
develop in advanced students a more adequate comprehension of the requirements 
and responsibilities essential for independent research investigation. In all the 
graduate programs emphasis is placed upon a high level of scholarship rather 
than upon the satisfaction of specific course or credit requirements. 

Exceptional facilities for graduate study are provided at North Carolina State 
University. New buildings furnish modern well-equipped laboratories for graduate 
study in many areas. 

For a list of graduate degrees offered at North Carolina State University, see 
pages 13-14. 



DIVISION OF 
CONTINUING EDUCATION 

1911 Building 

William Lindsay Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

David B. Stansel, Associate Director 

Assistant Directors: C. F. Kolb, M. E. Starnes; Assistant to the Director: H. H. 
Ethridge; Graphics Manager: H. G. Walker Jr.; Continuing Education 
Specialists: N. B. Broyles, K. R. Crump, J. F. Cudd Jr., J. B. Gordon, D. S. 
Jackson, M. E. Shields; Director of Instruction, Truck Driver Training 
School: R. M. Haynie Jr.; Social Services Specialists: Ann T. Lichtner; 
Aging Specialist: Sands Gresham 

The Division of Continuing Education of North Carolina State University is the 
statewide adult education service linking the University, its scholars, research and 
resources with the people and communities of the State. Varying in length and 
format from one-day conferences and short courses to regular semester- length 



237 



classes and educational television, continuing education's philosophy and objectives 
rest upon five premises: 

1. To assist professional persons, scientists, and engineers to stay 
abreast of the knowledge explosion in their particular fields; 

2. To make available to each individual the opportunity to continue 
his or her higher educational advancement — either graduate or 
undergraduate ; 

3. To make available to each citizen the cultural advantages of the 
University so that each can broaden his horizons and make adjustments 
to our civilization; and 

4. To create an awareness and an understanding among citizens of 
public issues and public affairs so that they are better able to make ob- 
jective decisions. 

5. To meet the educational needs of all the people who are not already 
served by other state institutions in ways consonant with the high 
academic standards of North Carolina State University. 

Though increasingly designed for those who have been to college, many programs 
are open to any adult who can benefit from university-level study. The instructional 
staff consists of faculty from the University, from other institutions, and out- 
standing authorities in specific fields. 

Only those programs appropriate to the standards of scholarship and instruction 
of North Carolina State University are offered as continuing education programs. 
Both credit and noncredit programs are offered on the University campus, in 
communities throughout the State and by correspondence instruction throughout 
the world. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

The division offers more than 46 different courses through its Bureau of 
Correspondence Instruction. Credit courses are offered in the following subject 
areas: agriculture, economics, education, engineering, English, geosciences, history, 
mathematics, modern languages, philosophy, politics, sociology and statistics. The 
correspondence bureau also has available high school review courses in English 
and mathematics. These courses can be utilized by persons who need to fulfill 
certain college entrance requirements, or by persons who have either scored poorly 
or need additional help on college entrance examinations. 

CREDIT AND NONCREDIT EVENING CLASSES 

The division offers, during the fall and spring semesters, a series of credit and 
noncredit courses on the University campus. The credit courses are sponsored and 
taught by the academic departments of the University and are generally conducted 
in the late afternoon and evening. These courses are offered to the already occupied 
mature person who is unable to attend classes during daytime hours. Approximately 
110 courses in a variety of subject areas are offered each semester. The noncredit 
classes are designed for cultural and professional enrichment. 

OFF-CAMPUS CREDIT CLASSES 

Extension classes are offered in all sections of the State. These offerings are 
mainly on a need basis or by request from organizations or special groups. Courses 
are available in almost all subject matter areas from engineering to the social 
sciences. During the previous year the division administered 70 credit classes in 
22 different locations with registrations totaling over 1,210. 

SHORT COURSES, INSTITUTES, AND CONFERENCES 

Variety and the necessity for providing educational opportunities for all the 
people of the State are the keystone to the division's offerings of short courses, 

238 



institutes, conferences, etc. These programs, more than any others, mark the 
University's efforts to meet its land-grant tradition of providing education to all 
the people. The scope of the programs include: agriculture, engineering, forestry, 
textiles, the physical sciences, economics, management, communications, education 
and recreation. During the year 1971-72, there were 170 courses offered with 
registrations totaling over 10,283. 

The North Carolina Truck Driver Training School (classified as a short course 
program) annually offers 12 four-week courses for professional truck drivers. The 
school is sponsored by the North Carolina Motor Carriers Association. 



EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION 

Television Center 

Jack Porter, Director 

The North Carolina State University Television Center is an integral unit of 
University of North Carolina educational television, a statewide television system 
capable of reaching approximately 90 percent of the state's population through a 
network of interconnected broadcast transmitters. The Center produces a wide 
variety of instructional, informational and general programs for public use through 
this system. In addition, it is involved in creating and coordinating television 
materials for on-campus instructional programs at North Carolina State University. 

SUMMER SESSIONS 

1911 Building 

Charles F. Kolb, Associate Director 

The Summer Sessions at North Carolina State University offers an extensive 
education program designed to meet the varied needs and interests of thousands of 
students who come to the campus each summer. 

Each of the University's eight schools — represented by more than 50 different 
departments — offers instruction in over 400 courses, more than 40 percent of which 
are at the graduate level. A faculty of more than 350 teachers participates in 
programs for summer study. Six of the eight schools offer regular courses during 
the two five-week terms. The School of Design offers one nine-week program and 
the School of Forestry conducts a summer camp for sophomores and two five-week 
practicums. In addition, there are numerous special programs and institutes 
offered during the summer by the University. 

Summer courses and special programs are designed for the new student, the 
undergraduate wanting to advance his academic standing at North Carolina State 
University, the graduate desiring to continue his study and research during the 
summer months, and the visiting student pursuing degrees at other institutions. 
The summer program can also be utilized by persons in professional fields who 
simply wish to keep abreast of new developments and trends in their particular 
area of endeavor. There is also the opportunity to take required subcollege level 
work in English and mathematics for those seeking to enroll at the University. 

Students seeking information regarding any of the University's summer activities 
should contact: Director of Summer Sessions, North Carolina State University, 
Post Office Box 5125, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 



URBAN AFFAIRS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES CENTER 

1911 Building 

Associate Director: W. G. Roberts Jr. 



239 



Assistant Directors: Spurgeon Cameron, F. E. Emory 

The center is the focal point for a campus-wide research, education and com- 
munity service program which is designed to enable North Carolina State Uni- 
versity to respond more effectively to the problems of our urbanizing society. The 
program encourages multidisciplinary participation by faculty and students with 
a high priority being given to the service-learning concept. Through the auspices 
of the center, representatives from federal, state and local governmental units, as 
well as private agencies, can join with University personnel in working on 
problems of mutual concern. Program areas now receiving attention include hous- 
ing, human resources development, volunteerism, child development, urban renewal, 
social services, environmental quality and regionalism. The center program is 
closely coordinated with the work being done at other campuses of the University 
as well as that of other educational institutions. 

COMPUTING CENTER 

LeRoy B. Martin Jr., Director 

North Carolina State University is one of the three universities owning the 
Triangle Universities Computation Center (TUCC). This internationally known 
facility is located in the Research Triangle Park 15 miles from Raleigh. The other 
participating universities are the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and 
Duke University at Durham. 

The central equipment located at TUCC is an IBM System 370, Model 165 with 
2.0 million characters of memory. In addition, 900 million characters of on-line 
storage are available as well as extensive teleprocessing equipment for communi- 
cation with the member universities and other institutions throughout the state. 

Each university has one high-speed terminal as well as several other medium 
and low-speed devices located in key positions on campus. The input-output 
terminals are connected to the Model 165 by telecommunication lines. 

The high-speed terminal at North Carolina State University is an IBM 360, 
Model 40 located at the Computing Center in the Nelson Textile Building. It 
provides communication with TUCC and simultaneously processes many of the 
administration's data processing applications. Many other terminals, both small 
computers and typewriter-type, are located on the campus. They and the Model 40 
are used for faculty and student research and for instruction in scheduled credit 
courses and noncredit courses. Each of the eight schools and an increasing number 
of their departments are finding these facilities to be an important tool in the total 
educational process for their students. 

MILITARY EDUCATION AND 
TRAINING 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE (ARMY ROTC) 

Professor: Colonel W. L. Bovlston; Instructors: LTC R. E. Conroy, Major A. A. 
Jones, CPT P. J. Tuohig, CPT R. N. Moore, CPT G. W. Johnson, Major 
R. S. Williams Jr. 

DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES (AIR FORCE ROTC) 

Professor: Colonel David F. First; Instructors: Major J. D. Wingfield, CAPT H. 
M. Baddley Jr., CAPT C. T. Farmer 

OBJECTIVES 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps designates University students who are to 
be enrolled in the Department of Military Science (Army ROTC) or in the Depart- 

240 



ment of Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC). These departments are integral but 
separate academic and administrative subdivisions of the institution. 

The mission of the Army ROTC program is to produce well-educated com- 
missioned officers in sufficient numbers to meet Army requirements. 

The mission of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) is to 
commission, through a college campus program, second lieutenants in response to 
Air Force officer requirements. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

Army ROTC — The program of instruction for the Army ROTC consists of a two- 
year basic course and a two-year advanced course. Also available is a two-year 
program designed for junior college graduates, and students at four-year colleges 
who were unable to take ROTC during their first two years of college. 

Air Force ROTC — The program of instruction for the Air Force ROTC consists 
of a two-year general military course, field training course and a two-year Profes- 
sional officer course. 

Students desiring to enter either the Army or Air Force two-year program should 
contact the Military Science Department, Room 160, Reynolds Coliseum, or the 
Aerospace Studies Department, Room 145, Reynolds Coliseum, before the start of 
the spring semester of their sophomore year. 

The Army and Air Force ROTC units conduct a flight instruction program. A 
limited number of highly qualified cadets participate in this instruction which 
includes approximately 36 Vz hours of flying in light aircraft plus ground school 
incident to that training. (All Air Force ROTC cadets who are qualified and have 
volunteered for active duty pilot training pursue this instruction.) Successful 
completion of the light aircraft instruction may qualify cadets for a Federal Aviation 
Agency private pilot's certificate. 

Satisfactory completion of the advanced courses qualifies a student for com- 
missioning as a second lieutenant in the Army or Air Force Reserve upon gradua- 
tion from the University. A detailed description of all military courses is given 
under each of the departments in the section of the catalog which lists course 
descriptions. 

ARMY ROTC 

The selection of advanced-course students is made from applicants who are 
physically qualified and who have above average academic and military records. 
Veterans who have one year or more of service in the Armed Forces are eligible 
for enrollment in the Army ROTC advanced course upon reaching their junior year, 
provided they are in good academic standing, physically qualified, have not reached 
their 27th birthday and are selected by the PMS and the University administration. 

The Army ROTC course includes instruction in American military history, map 
reading, leadership, military teaching methods, military justice, troop movements, 
the role of the U. S. in world affairs, administration, operations and logistics. 
These subjects not only prepare students to be officers in the United States Army, 
but also awaken in them an appreciation of the obligations of citizenship and 
secure for them personal benefits resulting from practical application of organiza- 
tion and responsible leadership. 

AIR FORCE ROTC 

A student enrolled in the Air Force ROTC may pursue a four-year program or a 
two-year program. Both offer the opportunity for receiving an AFROTC scholar- 
ship. 

Students, to meet enrollment requirements for the professional officer course, 
must achieve a qualifying score on the Air Force Officer Qualification Test 
(AFOQT), meet necessary physical requirements and must have good academic 
records. Qualified veterans desiring a commission through the Air Force ROTC 
program are required to complete the two-year advanced program and, in most 

241 



cases, attend four weeks of field training. Non-veterans must complete the two-year 
general military course, the two-year professional officer course, and attend four 
weeks of field training. Non-veterans may elect to successfully complete six weeks 
field training and the two-year professional officer course in lieu of the above four- 
year program. Both programs must be completed before their 30th birthday to 
qualify for a commission. 

UNIFORMS 

Uniforms for Army and Air Force ROTC are provided by the University from 
commutation funds paid by the Federal Government. 

CREDIT 

Credit is allowed for work at other institutions having an ROTC unit established 
in accordance with the provisions of the National Defense Act and regulations 
governing the ROTC. Record of a student's prior education and training in the 
ROTC is obtained from the institution concerned. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Army ROTC — One-, two-, three- and four-year scholarships are available to 
selected Army ROTC students who are strongly motivated toward a career in the 
Army. Each scholarship pays for tuition, books and laboratory expenses, and the 
student receives $100 a month for the duration of the scholarship. 

Air Force ROTC — A limited number of selected students enrolled in the Air 
Force ROTC program may qualify for scholarships. All scholarships pay $100 a 
month (tax-free) plus tuition, fees and reimbursement of textbook costs. In addition, 
all students in the last two years of the Air Force ROTC program receive a sub- 
sistence allowance of $100 per month. 

For summer training of four to six weeks, students will receive pay and travel 
allowance. Students in the Army basic or Air Force general military course other 
than scholarship students receive no monetary allowance. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE ROTC 

Army — The Army ROTC unit at North Carolina State University consists of a 
cadet battalion, commanded by a cadet lieutenant colonel, and comprised of a 
headquarters company and lettered companies. The cadet lieutenant colonel and all 
other cadet officers are selected from students enrolled in the second year advanced 
course. Cadet sergeant majors, first sergeants and sergeants first class are 
appointed from students enrolled in the first year advanced course. Certain specially 
selected students in the second year basic course also are appointed as cadet non- 
commissioned officers. Cadet officers and non-commissioned officers obtain invalu- 
able experience in leadership by being responsible for conducting all drill 
instruction. They are observed and supervised in this by the officers and non- 
commissioned officers of the Army assigned to the University. 

Air Force — The Air Force ROTC unit is organized as a cadet group (commanded 
by a cadet colonel) with an appropriate number of squadrons; the squadrons are 
composed of flights and squads. The group, squadron and flight commanders and 
their staff are cadet commissioned officers and are selected from cadets enrolled 
in the professional officers course. All other positions are held by cadet non- 
commissioned officers who are selected from general military course cadets. Cadet 
officers and non-commissioned officers obtain invaluable experience in leadership 
by being responsible for planning and conducting all aspects of the cadet group 
operation. They are observed and supervised by the officers and airmen assigned 
to the University. 



242 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 

The University is authorized to name outstanding students of the Army ROTC 
and Air Force ROTC as Distinguished Military Students or Distinguished Air 
Force ROTC Cadets. These students may, upon graduation, be designated 
Distinguished Military Graduates or Distinguished Air Force ROTC Graduates. The 
Distinguished Military Graduates may be selected for commission in the regular 
Army, provided they so desire. 



243 




The D. H. Hill Library opens onto the University Plaza which is one of the busiest 
places on campus. Classrooms and a campus snackbar are conveniently located 
nearby. 



244 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



In a typical course description, the semester hours of credit, the number of actual 
lecture and laboratory hours of meeting per week, and the term or terms in which 
the course is offered are shown in this manner: 2 (1-2) F S Sum. or 1-3 F S Sum. 

The 2 indicates the number of semester hours credit given for satisfactory com- 
pletion of the course. The (1-2) indicates that the course meets for one hour of 
lecture and for two hours of laboratory work each week. The 1-3 indicates that 
a maximum of 3 and a minimum of 1 semester hours credit can be earned. This is 
to be arranged with the instructor. The F designates the course to be given the fall 
semester. Likewise, the S designates spring and the Sum., summer. 

Waiver of prerequisites is at the descretion of the instructor. 



CONTENTS 



Adult and Community College 

Education 246 

Aerospace Engineering 388 

Agricultural Education 248 

Agricultural Engineering 258 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 

(General Courses) 249 

Animal Science 250 

Anthropology 253 

Architecture 253 

Art 256 

Biochemistry 257 

Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering 258 

Biological Sciences 262 

Biomathematics 263 

Botany 264 

Chemical Engineering 267 

Chemistry 272 

Civil Engineering 276 

Computer Science 284 

Crop Science 288 

Design 291 

Economics 293 

Education 301 

Electrical Engineering 311 

Engineering (General Courses) . . . .318 

Engineering Honors 319 

Engineering Mechanics 320 

Engineering Operations 325 

English 325 

Entomology 330 

Food Science 334 

Forestry 336 

French 404 

Genetics 340 



German 405 

Geology 342 

Guidance and Personnel Services . . .347 

History 348 

Horticultural Science 356 

Industrial and Technical 

Education 359 

Industrial Arts 362 

Industrial Engineering 365 

International Student 

Orientation 371 

Italian 406 

Landscape Architecture 371 

Marine Sciences 373 

Materials Engineering 374 

Mathematics 378 

Mathematics and Science 

Education 386 

Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering 388 

Meteorology 397 

Microbiology 399 

Military Education & Training 

Aerospace Studies (Air ROTC) . . 401 

Military Science (Army ROTC) . .402 

Modern Languages 404 

Music 408 

Nuclear Engineering 409 

Nutrition 332 

Operations Research 412 

Philosophy 413 

Physical and Mathematical 

Sciences 416 

Physical Education 417 

Physical Oceanography 420 

Physics 421 



245 



Physiology 333 Spanish 407 

Plant Pathology 426 Speech 460 

Politics 428 Statistics 462 

Poultry Science 436 Technical Education 359 

Product Design 438 Textile Chemistry 466 

Psychology 439 Textile Technology 468 

Pulp and Paper Science Textiles (General Courses) 473 

and Technology 336 Toxicology 334 

Recreation Resources University Studies 474 

Administration 446 Urban Design 475 

Religion 448 Vocational Industrial 

Russian 407 Education 359 

Science Education 386 Wood and Paper Science 

Sociology 450 and Technology 476 

Soil Science 457 Zoology 480 



ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 The Community College System 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Graduate or advanced undergraduate standing 

Comprehensive community colleges and technical institutes and the state systems 
of which they are a part: underlying concepts, educational needs they are designed 
to serve, role in meeting these needs, historical development, issues in the establish- 
ment and operation of state systems and individual institutions, unresolved issues 
and emerging trends. Graduate Staff 

ED 501 (SOC 501) Leadership 3 (3-0) F S 

(See sociology, page 453.) 

ED 502 (PS 502) Public Administration 3 (3-0) F S 

(See politics, page 432.) 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and 

Community College Education 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: ED 501, consent of instructor 

The principles and processes involved in programming, including basic theories 
and concepts supporting the programming process. Attention will be given to the 
general framework in which programming is done, the organization needed and 
the program roles of both professional and lay leaders. Graduate Staff 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, 

Contemporary Nature 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

A study of the historical and philosophical foundations of adult education from 
ancient times to the present, giving attention to key figures, issues, institutions, 
movements and programs, including consideration of the relationship between 
adult education's historical development and prevailing intellectual, social, eco- 
nomic and political conditions. Consideration of adult education's contemporary 
nature, present-day schools of thought on its objectives and trends. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 513 (SOC 513) Community Organization 3 (3-0) F S 

(See sociology, page 454.) 

246 



ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function 

in Higher Education 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ED 510 

An examination of the background, history, philosophy and contemporary nature 
of the extension and public service function of institutions of higher education in 
the United States. Emphasis is placed on the adult education role of public and 
private universities and colleges. Specific focus is on: General Extension, Indus- 
trial Extension, Engineering Extension, Cooperative Extension and Continuing 
Education. Graduate Staff 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community 

College Education 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ED 559, Graduate standing 

This course examines forms of instruction appropriate for the teaching of adults. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon methods which maximally involve the adult 
learner. The study of concepts, theories, and principles relevant to the selection, 
utilization, and evaluation of instructional strategies will focus on the integration 
of theory into practice. Through participation in classroom exercises, the 
student will develop proficiency in using teaching techniques which are applicable 
in adult and community college education. Graduate Staff 

ED 559 Learning Concepts and Theories Applied to 

Adult and Community College Education 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Six hours in education 

Principles involved in adult education programs including theories and con- 
cepts undergirding and requisite to these programs. Emphasis will be given to the 
interrelationship of the nature of adult learning, the nature of the subject matter 
and the setting in which learning occurs. The applicability of relevant principles 
and pertinent research findings to adult learning will be thoroughly treated. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and 

Community College Education Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Study and scientific analysis of problems in adult education, and preparation of 
a scholarly research type of paper. Graduate Staff 

ED 598 Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, Motivating 

and Teaching Disadvantaged Adults 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor 

Designed to help adult educators acquire a comprehensive understanding of the 
educational, psychological social, cultural, and economic problems of the culturally 
deprived segments of society. In-depth explorations of the theoretical basis for 
understanding, motivating and teaching disadvantaged adults will be interwoven 
with practical applications of these bases to specific educational opportunities with 
the disadvantaged adult learner. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to 

Adult and Community College Education 3 (3-0) F 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to 

Adult and Community College Education 3 (3-0) S 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education 1-3 F S 

247 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 102 Objectives in Agricultural Education 1 (1-0) F S 

Designed to help the student understand the purpose of agricultural education 
at North Carolina State. Also provides an opportunity for students to develop an 
understanding of purposes of vocational agriculture and other programs of education 
in agriculture. Mr. Bryant 

ED 313 Contemporary Vocational Agriculture 3 (3-0) F S 

The contemporary program of vocational agriculture is examined in depth in 
relation to changing and expanding career opportunities in agricultural education. 
Study is directed to the continuing adjustment of the program objectives, curri- 
culum organization, content of courses, teaching practices, instructional resources 
and evaluation emphasis in modern programs in vocational agriculture. Prerequi- 
site for student teaching in agricultural education. Mr. Bryant 

ED 411 Student Teaching in Agriculture 8 (2-15) F S 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304, senior standing, admission to teacher education 
and an overall 2.0 average 

The first part of the semester, six or seven weeks, will be on.campus. The remain- 
der of the semester will be spent in a high school doing full-time student teaching. 
The student will get experience in all phases of the vocational agriculture 
program, including community study, adult education and home supervision. The 
student teacher will be supervised by the local teacher of agriculture and a member 
of the staff in agricultural education. Mr. Scarborough 

ED 412 Teaching Adults 2 (1-2) F S 

Principles of effective teaching applied to adults. Experience in organizing and 

conducting groups for discussion of local problems. Mr. Miller 

ED 413 Planning Educational Programs 2 (1-2) F S 

Principles of program planning applied to educational programs in agriculture. 
Resources needed for adequate planning. Field work in planning programs. 

ED 490 Senior Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 (1-0) F S 

An analysis of the opportunities and problems facing educational leaders in 

agriculture with particular emphasis upon current problems. Staff 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: ED 411 or equivalent 

Consideration of the need for planning programs in education; objectives and 
evaluation of community programs; use of advisory gi-oup; organization and use 
of facilities. Mr. Bryant 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: ED 411 

The theory of education and work is related to the expanding field of agricultural 
occupations. Career development in agricultural occupations is associated with 
curriculum development needs. Occupational experience in agriculture is seen in 
relation to the curriculum and to placement in agricultural occupations. 

Messrs. Miller, Scarborough 

248 



ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: ED 411 

A major and critical element in all programs of vocational education is the pro- 
vision for appropriate student learning experiences in a real and simulated employ- 
ment environment. Due to recent developments in education and agriculture, new 
and expanded concepts of occupational experience have been devised. Current 
research substantiates the need and desire of teachers of agriculture for assistance 
in implementing the new concepts. The course is designed not only to provide 
this aid but to develop a depth of understanding of the theoretical foundations 
underlying the new developments in occupational experiences to stimulate individual 
growth and creativity in implementing further developments. Mr. Miller 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: ED 411 or equivalent 

Designed to meet the needs of leaders in adult education. Opportunity to study 
some of the basic problems and values in working with adult groups. Attention 
will be given to the problem of fitting the educational program for adults into the 
public school program and other educational programs as well as to the methods of 
teaching adults. Mr. Scarborough 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: ED 411 or equivalent 

Opportunities for students to study current problems under the guidance of the 
staff. Staff 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education 1-3 F S Sum. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor 

The major purpose of this course is to help teachers and others involved in 
occupational exploration programs to further develop their understandings and 
competencies in these areas. The approach will be based upon an understanding of 
the philosophy underlying the world of work and the role of occupational exploration 
in educational programs for young people. Messrs. Scarborough, Bryant 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 617 Philosophy of Agricultural Education 3 (3-0) S 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

ED 689 Evaluation in Occupational Education 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education Credits Arranged 

ED 694 Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 (1-0) F S 

ED 699 Research Credits Arranged Maximum 2 



AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 

General Courses 

ALS 103 Orientation 1 (0-2) F 

An introduction to the scope and objectives of a university education with empha- 

249 



sis on the sciences particularly as related to biology and agriculture. Guest lectures 
and laboratory demonstrations. Mr. Glazener 

ALS 299 Superior Student Seminar 1 S Maximum 2 

Prerequisite: Freshman and sophomore honor students 

A seminar program open only to freshmen and sophomore students in the honors 
program. Participation is by invitation. 

ALS 490 (LA 490) International Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Juniors and seniors, upperclassmen interested in international affairs. 
This course will consist of weekly series of seminar sessions on the economic and 
social aspects of developing countries. Open to junior and senior students. 

ALS 499 Honors Student Research 1-3 S Maximum 6 

A research program open only to junior and senior students in the honors pro- 
gram. Participation is by invitation. 

AC 311 Communications Methods and Media 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: ENG 111, ENG 112 

Designed to give an insight into the communications process: written, oral and 
visual techniques of communications; a survey of the channels of communications 
available; principles and techniques for using these channels individually or com- 
bined into a publicity, promotion, public relations, information or advertising pro- 
gram. Mr. Carpenter 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science^ 4 (3-3) F S 

A study of the fundamental principles of dairying and of meat animal production. 

The importance of dairy and meat products in the human diet and in the state and 

national economy is emphasized. Messrs. Goode, Rakes 

ANS 204 Livestock Feeds and Feeding 3 (2-3) S 

An introduction to applied animal nutrition, including the structure and function 

of the digestive tract, the nutrient value and classification of feedstuffs and the 

nutrient requirements and formulation of livestock rations. Mr. Leatherwood 

ANS 301 (FS 301, NTR 301) Nutrition and Man 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Two years of college work 

The significance of nutrition in the health, welfare and behavior of man; a 
study of the basic principles relating to practical problems in the provision and 
utilization of adequate nutrients for individuals and populations living under various 
environmental conditions. Messrs. Wise, Aurand 

ANS 302 Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 2 (0-6) S 

Market classes and grades of beef cattle, swine and sheep are used to study 
live animal-carcass value interrelationships. Breed histories, pedigree evaluation 
and the desired characteristics of dairy cattle, meat animals and quarter horses are 
examined. Messrs. Harvey, Wilk 

ANS 308 Advanced Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals 1 (0-3) F 

Prerequisite: ANS 302 or consent of instructor 

An advanced study of dairy and meat animal selection, including the relation- 
ships between the live animal and its carcass. Included is intensive practice to 

250 



develop proficiency in the selection of market and purebred livestock. Field trips 
are made to leading farms in order to study outstanding animals of the various 
breeds. Messrs. Harvey, Wilk 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology 3 (2.-3) S 

Prerequisite: ZO 421 

Current concepts of physiology as related to mammalian reproduction. Emphasis 
is placed upon understanding physiological processes, how they are influenced by 
external forces and their importance in reproductive performance. The student may 
be required to select, design and conduct a special research project. 

Messrs. Myers, Johnson 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: ANS 204 

A study of modern principles and practices in beef cattle care and management. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the application of principles of genetics, ruminant 
nutrition and animal health to cow-calf programs and to stocker and feeder cattle 
operations. Mr. Harvey 

ANS 403 Swine Management 3 (2-3) S 
Prerequisite: ANS 204 

A study of the economic, nutritional, genetic, physiological and managerial 

factors affecting the operation of modern swine enterprises. Mr. Coalson 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: ANS 204 

A study of practical dairy farm management, including feed acquisition and 
utilization, breeding and selection, health and sanitation, herd replacements and 
dairy farm buildings. Particular emphasis is placed upon the consequences of 
management alternatives and the importance of herd and farm business records. 
(Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) Mr. Davenport 

ANS 405 Lactation 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: ZO 421 

Gross and microscopic anatomy of the developing and the mature mammary 
gland. Physiological processes involved in milk secretion and the removal of milk 
from the gland are studied. A special research problem is required. 

Mr. Mochrie 

ANS 406 Sheep Management 3 (2-3) F 
Prerequisite: ANS 204 

A study of the economic, genetic, nutritional, physiological and managerial 

factors affecting the operation of the modern sheep enterprise. Mr. Goode 

ANS 409 (FS 409) Meat and Meat Products 3 (2-3) S 

(See food science, page 335.) 

ANS 410 Horse Management 3 (2-2) F 

Application of fundamentals of selection, nutrition, breeding and animal health 

to light horses. Managerial details of horses are covered. Mr. Barrick 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of Domestic Animals 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

Genetic principles are stressed in relation to the improvement of economically 

251 



important domestic species. Emphasis is given to the specific requirements of 
breeding plans for individual species. Mr. McDaniel 

ANS 415 (NTR 415, PO 415) Comparative Nutrition 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CH 220 or CH 221 

Fundamentals of animal nutrition, including the classification of nutrients; their 
requirement and general metabolism by different species for health, maintenance, 
growth and other productive functions. Messrs. Ramsey, Donaldson 

ANS 416 (NTR 416) Quantitative Nutrition 3 (1-6) F 
Prerequisite: BCH 351 or equivalent 

Quantitative principles are applied to the study of nutrition by using animals 

and microorganisms in practical experiments. Messrs. Smith, Jones 

ANS 490 Animal Science Seminar 1 (1-0) S 

Review and discussion of special topics and current literature pertaining to all 

phases of animal science. Mr. Porterfield 

GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS 502 (PHY 502) Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ZO 421 or consent of instructor 

Emphasis is placed upon discussion of mechanisms which control the reproductive 
processes. Mechanisms which are species-limited are compared with those which 
are shared by all. Current knowledge of some subsystems is investigated in detail, 
while others are referred to in reviews of well-documented research findings. 

Mr. Ulberg 

ANS 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: CH 101, CH 103 

The pathology of bacterial, viral, parasitic, nutritional, thermal and mechanical 
disease processes. Mr. Batte 

ANS 508 (GN 508) Genetics of Animal Improvement 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: GN 411, ST 511 

Emphasis is placed upon the utilization of basic principles of population and 
quantitative genetics in animal improvement. Factors affecting genie and geno- 
typic frequencies and methods of estimating genetic and non genetic variance, 
heritabilities and breeding values are presented. The roles of mating systems 
and selection procedures in producing superior genetic populations are examined. 

Mr. Robison 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science Maximum 6 F S 

Special problems are selected or assigned in various phases of animaj science. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ANS 603 (GN 603) Population Genetics in Animal Improvement 3 (3-0) F 

ANS 604 (PHY 604) Experimental Animal Physiology 4 (2-4) F 

ANS 622 (ST 622) Principles of Biological Assays 3 (3-0) S 

ANS 653 (BCH 653) Mineral Metabolism 3 (3-0) F 

ANS 690 Seminar in Animal Nutrition 1 (1-0) F S 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science Credits Arranged F S 
252 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

(Also see Sociology) 



FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 3 (3-0) F S 

The study of the development of man as a species; analysis of the formation and 
spread of races; introduction to archaeology as a study of the material remains of 
ancient man and his activities. 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 (3-0) F S 

The analysis of various living societies and their cultures in terms ol social 
adjustment to recurrent needs. 

ANT 305 Peoples of the World 3 (3-0) F S 

This course seeks to develop insights of wide applicability concerning human 
relationships and the adjustment of man to his geographical, social and cultural 
environments. The course is designed to demonstrate interrelationships among 
diverse factors affecting human behavior in all societies. 

ANT 410 Theories of Culture 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: Six hours sociology, ANT 252 or equivalent 

The study of major anthropological theories of culture with intensive analysis of 
their application. 

ANT 416 Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Six hours anthropology 

I. To provide a systematic experience with anthropological field techniques, i.e., 
community mapping; household census; kinship analysis; life-history recording; 
participant observation; inventory of material culture; child rearing observation. 
II. To furnish an opportunity to use conventional anthropological field tools, i.e., 
tape recorder, motion picture camera, still camera, fieldwork journal, unstructured 
interview. III. Through textbooks and supplementary reading, students will become 
familiar with anthropologists' reports of their own field methods and the problems 
they encountered. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANT 512 Applied Anthropology 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: ANT 252 or consent of instructor 

The course includes a review of the historical development of applied anthropology 
and a study of anthropology as applied in government, industry, community develop- 
ment, education and medicine. The processes of cultural change are analyzed in 
terms of the application of anthropological techniques to programs of developmental 
change. 



ARCHITECTURE 

ARC 300 Historic Architecture Research 2 F S 

Prerequisite: DN 202 

Research and the recording of sites, monuments, buildings or artifacts of histori- 
cal interest. Mr. Reuer 

253 



ARC 315 (EM 315) Architectural Mechanics I 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: One semester of calculus; recommended PY 221 or equivalent 

An introduction to the mechanics of architectural structures: a lecture-workshop 
course in which the determinants of architectural form are related to structural 
function through a study of mechanics; principles of statics including particle and 
rigid body mechanics, force systems, equilibrium, and internal force systems. Lec- 
tures will present concepts and methods; workshops will provide an opportunity for 
application and exploration of lecture material. Staff 

ARC 316 (EM 316) Architectural Mechanics II 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: ARC 315 (EM 315) 

A continuation of ARC 315 (EM 315): a lecture-workshop course which investi- 
gates the mechanical properties of construction materials and the purpose, geo- 
metrical characteristics, behavior, and design of structural elements. Lectures will 
present concepts and methods; workshops will provide opportunity for application 
and exploration of lecture material. Staff 

ARC 331 Environmental Building Systems 2 (1-3) F S 

The establishment and development of the concept of building as an environ- 
mental control mechanism, i.e., as a barrier between the natural environment and 
the activities and human needs to be accommodated. A description of environmen- 
tal factors upon which the science of building construction is based. An investigation 
of basic building materials, their properties, processes of production and principal 
systems of enclosure. Consideration will also be given to economic factors and 
legal controls. Mr. Aho 

ARC 332 Environmental Control Systems 2 (1-3) F S 

A study of the basic systems used to control the environment: air, heat, light, 
sound and sanitation. Emphasis placed upon the principles and the conceptual 
understanding of each system through comparative analysis of the system's char- 
acteristics and the investigation of the effect of each system on architectural form. 

Mr. Barnes 

ARC 400 Intermediate Architectural Design (Series) 4 (1-9) F S 

Prerequisite: DN 202 or equivalent or consent of department 

Design investigations aimed at the development of an understanding of the major 
issues confronting the contemporary architect and at the expanding of problem- 
solving abilities in architectural design. Students must complete four semesters 
to satisfy this requirement, selecting from a number of vertically organized work- 
shops which offer on an optional basis a wide range of program emphases. 

Staff 

ARC 415 (CE 415) Architectural Structures I 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: ARC 316 (EM 316) 

Not open to civil engineering students. 

Fundamental concepts underlying the behavior of statically determinate building 
systems; investigation of the design and construction techniques used in steel and 
timber framing. Lectures will present concepts and methods; workshops will provide 
an opportunity for application and exploration of lecture material. Staff 

ARC 416 (CE 416) Architectural Structures II 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: ARC 415 (CE 415) 

Not open to civil engineering students. 

Fundamental concepts underlying the behavior, analysis, and design of statically 
indeterminate building systems; investigation of the design and construction 
techniques used in framing; analysis procedures for indeterminate structural 
elements; application of design with emphasis on reinforced concrete construction. 



254 



A terminal design project provides an opportunity for a synthesis of the four 
semester structures sequence. Lectures will present concepts methods; workshops 
will provide an opportunity for application and exploration of lecture material. 

Staff 

ARC 431 Industrialized Systems Building 2 (1-3) F S 

Prerequisite: ARC 331 

An analytic study of mass produced building systems to examine the implications, 
limitations and potentials of this type of architecture. The analysis is to include 
design, factory processes, distribution methods, fabrication, erection and economic 
analysis. Staff 

ARC 432 Climate Control Systems and Design 2 (1-3) F 

Prerequisite: ARC 332 

Further study of the mechanical systems used for heating, cooling, ventilating 
and conditioning the interior of buildings. The analysis and design of the climate 
control system for a small-scale building will be undertaken in this course. 

Mr. Barnes 

ARC 433 Illumination Design 2 (1-3) S 
Prerequisite: ARC 332 

Examination of interior and exterior lighting design, including vision, color, 

sources and control. Mr. Barnes 

ARC 441 Design Methods 2 (2-0) F S 

Description, comparisons and testing of the various methods which are available 
in architectural design with emphasis on problem-solving techniques. The method 
is primarily a means for integrating rational analysis and creative thought in the 
design act. Staff 

ARC 491 Special Projects in Architecture 1-4 F S 
Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Investigation of special projects by interdisciplinary groups or individuals in 

various phases of architecture. Staff 

ARC 495 Special Problems in Architecture 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Special problems in various aspects of architecture developed under the direction 
of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. Staff 

ARC 499 Architecture Seminar 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Presentations and discussions of special areas of interest in architecture and the 
allied design fields. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ARC 501, 502 Advanced Architectural Design I, II 6 (3-9) F S 

Prerequisites: (501) 16 credits of ARC 400 or equivalent; (502) ARC 501 

Advanced studies in architectural design in which are investigated large-scale 
architectural problems having complex functional, social and economic implications; 
special emphasis is given to problem identification, program formulation and appli- 
cation of advanced design methods. Messrs. Batchelor, Burns, Sanoff 

ARC 511 Professional Practice I 2 (2-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Fourth year standing 

The evolution of architecture as a modern practical profession; obligations of the 

255 



profession to society and to itself; the legal and ethical position of the architect in 
practice; comparative study of documents; the architect's working organization; 
emerging techniques of office practice. Staff 

ARC 512 Professional Practice II 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisite: Fourth year standing 

Continuing study of standard documents and emerging techniques of practice, 
with emphasis on the principles and improved techniques of writing construction 
specifications; interrelationships of The Contract Documents; comparative study 
of techniques of controlling competitive bidding. Staff 

ARC 521, 522 Advanced Architectural Structures I, II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: (521) ARC 416 (CE 416); (522) ARC 521 

Gravity and nongravity loads on structures; comparative behavior of structural 
materials; comparative behavior of simple structural systems; approximate and 
exact analysis procedures as applied to systems; principles of approximate and 
exact design in timber, steel and reinforced concrete; architectural/structural/ 
mechanical compatibility in systems; basic principles of foundation analysis and 
design. Mr. Brantly 

ARC 531, 532 Advanced Building Technology I, II 2 (1-3) F S 

Prerequisites: ARC 331, ARC 332 

A synthesis of studies in building science undertaken in previous courses. Material 
assemblies in practical application, dimensional characteristics of mechanical and 
construction systems for buildings and special projects in selected areas of building 
science. Staff 

ARC 551 Research Methods in Architecture 2 (2-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Seminar on the quantitative methods from various disciplines towards the 
scientific inquiry of knowledge. Analysis of techniques and instruments appropriate 
in solving problems involving scaling, measurement, modeling and gaming within 
the scope of the physical environment. 

ARC 591, 592 Advanced Topics in Architecture I, II 1-4 F S 

Prerequisite: Advanced or graduate standing in School of Design or departmental 
approval 

Investigations of advanced topics in specialized aspects of architecture for 
interested advanced undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Design. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ARC 601, 602 Advanced Architectural Design III, IV 6 (3-9) F S 

ARC 621, 622 Advanced Architectural Structures III, IV 2 (1-3) F S 

ARC 691, 692 Special Topics in Architecture Arranged 1-6 F S 

ART 

ART 200 The Visual Arts in Contemporary Life 3 (3-0) F 

The study of painting, sculpture, art crafts and the useful arts of commerce. Also, 
the study of the aesthetic nature of man from the standpoint of creativity and appre- 
ciation; relation of present day creative efforts of man with those of the past — 
giving the student an understanding of today's visual arts. Staff 



256 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochemistry 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CH 223 (may be taken concurrently) 

A survey course that presents an introduction to the basics of biochemistry and 
to the various areas of research the discipline encompasses. Mr. Armstrong 

BCH 452 Experimental Biochemistry 3 (1-6) F 

Prerequisite: BCH 351, or corequisite BCH 551; quantitiative chemical analysis 
recommended 

Fundamental techniques of biochemistry and molecular biology involving experi- 
mental study of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, metabol- 
ism, and metabolic controls. Complements BCH 551, which may be taken con- 
currently. Mrs. Theil 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: Three years of chemistry including CH 223 or equivalent; CH 431 
strongly recommended 

Principles of biochemistry including a study of structural and metabolic relation- 
ships of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes and coenzymes, and 
an introduction to the mechanisms involved in regulation of enzyme activity and 
protein synthesis. Designed to accompany BCH 452. Mr. Jones 

BCH 553 (PHY 553) Physiological Biochemistry 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: BCH 551 

Emphasis on the application of biochemical methods to the elucidation of the 
function of whole organisms. In particular, A. Biochemistry of 1) blood, 2) water, 
electrolyte, acid-base balance, 3) renal function, 4) muscle metabolism, 5) central 
nervous system, 6) autonomic nervous system, and 7) endocrine system. B. Bio- 
chemistry of adaptation to environment, i.e., 1) high and low Po 2 , 2) hot and cold, 
3) wet and dry, and 4) pollution. Mr. Longmuir 

BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology 2 (1-3) F 

Prerequisite: BCH 551 or CH 433 or CH 435 

The theory and application of radioisotope techniques used in biology. The 
different modes of radioactivity are correlated with methods of measurement. 
Emphasis is placed on the use and limitations of various instruments and tech- 
niques and on their application to research problems. Mr. Sisler 

BCH 557 Introductory Enzyme Kinetics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: BCH 551 and MA 201 or MA 212 

The basic principles of chemical kinetics applied to the development of enzyme 
kinetics. Limitations of the Michaelis equation are considered in light of the general 
rate equation. Inhibition and activation, pH functions, effects of temperature, and 
elucidation of mechanisms are also considered. Mr. Main 

BCH 561 (GN 561, MB 561) Biochemical and Microbial Genetics 3 (3-0) F 
Prerequisites: BCH 351 or BCH 551, GN 411 or GN 505, MB 401 or equivalent 

A study of the development of the fields of biochemical genetics and microbial 
genetics emphasizing both techniques and concepts currently used in research in 
these areas. Includes lectures and discussions of current research publications. 

Mr. Armstrong 



257 



BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry Credits Arranged F S Sum. 

Prerequisite: BCH 351 or equivalent Maximum 3 

The study of topics of special interest by small groups of students instructed by 
members of the faculty, usually for the purpose of developing new courses. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BCH 651 Physical Biochemistry 3 (3-0) S 

BCH 652 Biochemical Research Techniques 3-5 S 

BCH 653 (ANS 653) Mineral Metabolism 3 (3-0) F 

BCH 655 Intermediary Metabolism I 3 (3-0) S 

BCH 657 Intermediary Metabolism II 3 (3-0) F 

BCH 659 (CH 659) Natural Products 3 (3-0) F 

BCH 691 Seminar in Biochemistry 1 

BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry Credits Arranged 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research Credits Arranged 

BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery 4 (2-4) F S 

The study of farm machinery which begins with the materials of construction as 
they are related to design, cost, fabrication process, tools and techniques involved 
in construction, repair and maintenance, machine performance, reliability, machine 
capabilities and limitations. The operation, service, and adjustment of the machine 
will be studied by an analysis of the requirements to do the job for which it was 
designed, and consideration of the conditions under which it must operate. The 
selection, management, and economics of owning and operating machinery is 
emphasized. Mr. Howell 

BAE 251 Elements of Biological and Agricultural Engineering 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in SBE curriculum 

Elements of Biological and Agricultural Engineering is a course designed to 
introduce agricultural engineering students to pertinent topics basic to this field 
of study and to some of the current progress relating to the different subject areas. 
In addition, students will be introduced to various engineering procedures, tool 
processes, and materials utilized by the agricultural industries. Mr. Blum 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 303 Energy Conversion for Agricultural Production 2 (2-0) F 

Prerequisites: BS 100, MA 112 or MA 201, PY 211 or PY 205 

Energy transformations and exchanges of plants and animals are studied on the 
basis of physical theories and principles. Specific examples in thermal radiation, 
convection, conduction, phase changes, muscle work, photosynthesis, and respira- 
tion. Mr. Suggs 

258 



BAE 321 Irrigation, Terracing and Erosion Control 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

The principles of soil and water conservation engineering are examined. Topics 
discussed include surface and subsurface drainage, farm pond construction, open 
channel flow, soil erosion, conservation practices, irrigation, and the basic prin- 
ciples of surveying. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of these basic 
soil and water engineering concepts. Mr. Sneed 

BAE 331 (FS 331) Food Engineering 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: PY 211 or PY 221 

Engineering concepts and their application to the food industry will be presented. 
Principles of thermodynamics, fluid flow, heat transfer, refrigeration and electricity 
will be emphasized. Mr. Holmes 

BAE 332 Farm Structures 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: PY 211 or PY 221 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the role of farm structures 
in a rapidly changing agricultural situation. This, in turn, requires study of envir- 
onmental relationships, materials flow, structural features, design techniques, con- 
struction materials and construction procedures. Emphasis is placed on relating the 
theory to practical applications encountered in problem situations. Mr. Blum 

BAE 341 Farm Electrification and Utilities 3 (2-3) S 

Corequisite: PY 212 or PY 221 

A brief review of the development and present status of farm and rural electrifi- 
cation introduces a study of simple but basic electricity and its safe application 
through electric equipment and allied utilities to agricultural and farm enterprises. 
Fundamental farm wiring, circuit design, control and protection are carefully 
studied. Electric motors, water systems and the design of lighting, heating and 
ventilation systems for the farm and home are included in the course of study. 

Mr. Glover 

BAE 342 Agricultural Processing 4 (3-2) S 

Prerequisite: MA 301, MAE 301 

Theory and application of heat and mass transfer to processing of agricultural 
crops. Topics emphasized will include psychrometrics, thin layer and deep bed 
drying, continuous-flow drying, and principles of biochemical processing. Problem 
sessions will demonstrate principles of fluid flow, materials handling, process 
control, and various drying systems. Messrs. Young, Johnson 

BAE 361 Analytical Methods 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: MA 301 
Corequisite: EM 307 

A course designed to develop the student's skill in problem solving, ranging from 
the standard approaches to the mechanical design of machine elements and mech- 
anisms to innovative approaches to the design of whole machines and systems. 

Mr. Bowen 

BAE 381 Agricultural Structures and Environment 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: EM 307, MAE 301 

Principles of environmental control and structural analysis are combined with 
biological principles for the design of agricultural structures. Topics emphasized 
include physiological reactions of animals, plants and agricultural produce to their 
environment, applications of heat transfer and psychometrics in calculating venti- 
lation requirements and heating or cooling loads, structural analysis, material 
selection, agricultural waste management, and economic considerations of various 
structural alternatives. Mr. Baughman 



259 



BAE 391 Electrotechnology in Biological and 

Agricultural Engineering 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: EE 331 

Basic concepts for selecting and utilizing electromagnetic devices are covered in 
depth. Switching circuits and central circuits are discussed. Transducers and 
measurement techniques are related to agricultural problems. Mr. McClure 

BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: BAE 211, PY 211 or PY 221 

This course covers the application of heat engineering principles in the develop- 
ment and utilization of power of internal combustion engines, both spark ignition 
and diesel. Included are thermodynamic principles and a classification of these to 
the actual design and construction of engines, together with principles of carburetion 
and ignition. Power transmission units, hydraulics and hydraulic controls are 
emphasized. Power measurement and testing, and the economic utilization of power 
units are brought into the context of modern agriculture. Mr. Fore 

BAE 433 Crop Preservation and Processing 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: BAE 341 

This course deals with the physical and biochemical characteristics of harvested 
crops and crop products as they define the requirements for the best preservation of 
quality. The properties of air-water vapor mixtures, the application of heat to air 
and crops, the characteristics and use of fans and heaters, the air flow requirements 
and measurement for crop preservation and materials handling will be studied. 
Feed preparation, mixing and handling are included in the course. Mr. Young 

BAE 451, 452 Agricultural Engineering Design I and II 3 (1-6) F S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in SBE curriculum 

Design concepts are applied to current agricultural engineering problems. One 
major design project is combined with a variety of case studies and short term 
design problems to develop the student's confidence in his ability to do design work. 

Mr. Holmes 

BAE 461 Analysis of Agricultural Production Systems 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MA 201, EC 205, CSC 111 

A survey of methods of systems analysis and operations research with emphasis 
on applications to biological and agricultural problems. Topics discussed include: 
the systems approach to problem solving, intermediate economic analysis, basic 
concepts of probability, simulation, linear programming, and dynamic programming. 

Mr. Sowell 

BAE 462 Functional Design of Field Machines 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisites: BAE 361, MAE 301, SSC 200 

A study of the modern farm tractor and field machines. The emphasis of the 
course is on the translation of measurements of biological and physical factors of 
the agricultural production system into machine specifications that can be effective- 
ly converted into production machines by engineers of the manufacturing industry. 

Mr. Bowen 

BAE 465 (CHE 465) Introduction to Biomedical Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

(See chemical engineering page 269.) 

BAE 472 Agricultural Water Management 4 (3-2) F 

Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200 

Aspects of hydrology and soil-water-plant relationships as related to agricultural 
water management. Drainage and irrigation are discussed in depth. Water 
quality, agricultural related pollution, and water laws are discussed. Mr. Skaggs 



260 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 552 Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and 

Processing 2 (1-3) Alternate F 

Prerequisites: EE 331, MA 301 

Theory and application of primary sensing elements and transducers. Generalized 
performance characteristics and the use of standards. Use of specialized measure- 
ment systems for agricultural research and processing including an introduction 
to correlation and power spectral density measurements. Mr. Rohrbach 

BAE 570 (CE 570, MB 570) Sanitary Microbiology 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: MB 401 or equivalent 

Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry are presented and related 
to problems of stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological treatment. 
Laboratory exercises present basic microbiological techniques and illustrate from 
a chemical viewpoint some of the basic microbial aspects of waste disposal. 

Mr. Humenik 

BAE 578 (CE 578) Agricultural Waste Management 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: Graduate or advanced undergraduate standing 

A study of agricultural and associated processing wastes. Special laboratory 
techniques required for the characterization of these wastes will be emphasized. 
Principles and examples considered will be utilized to develop waste management 
and nondestructive waste utilization systems that are integral to the total operation. 

Mr. Humenik 

BAE 580 Analysis of the Physical Properties of 

Biomaterials 3 (2-2) Alternate S 

Prerequisites: PY 205, PY 208 

Physical characteristics — shape and size, volume and density, and surface area — 
of biomaterials, Aero- and hydro-dynamic characteristics (drag coefficient and 
terminal velocity) and dimensional analysis. Friction (static and rolling), particle 
mechanics and gravity and forced particle flow. Thermal properties (expansion and 
conductivity, specific heat), electrical properties (resistance and conductance, 
dielectric and electrostatic behavior), optical properties using transmittance and 
reflectance, and X-ray laser. Staff 

BAE 585 Biorheology 3 (2-2) Alternate S 

Prerequisites: PY 205, EM 307 

The concepts of strain, stress and the mechanical viscoelastic properties of bio- 
logical solids, fluids and slurries. The time-dependent deformation and flow of 
biomaterials, elements of strength of materials, rheological equations and model 
concepts, creep-relaxation and dynamic behavior, contact problems and the Boltz- 
man superposition principle as a function of time, temperature and moisture con- 
tent. Mr. Hamann 

BAE 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in agricultural engineering 

Each student will select a subject on which he will do research and write a 
technical report on his results. He may choose a subject pertaining to his parti- 
cular interest in any area of study in agricultural engineering. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BAE 654 NONEQUILIBRIUM THERMODYNAMICS IN 

Bioengineering 3 (3-0) Alternate S 



261 



BAE 661 Analysis of Function and Design of Biological and 

Physical Systems 3 (2-3) Alternate F 

BAE 671 (SSC 671) Theory of Drainage- 
Saturated Flow 3 (3-0) Alternate F 

BAE 674 (SSC 674) Theory of Drainage— 

Unsaturated Flow 3 (3-0) Alternate F 

BAE 695 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering Credits Arranged 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

BS 100 General Biology 4 (3-3) F S 

Basic principles and concepts of biology, including the structure and function of 
cells and organisms, the organization and requirements of living systems, develop- 
ment, heredity and evolution. 

BS 105 Biology in the Modern World 4 (3-3) F S 

An introduction to biology with chief emphasis on the applications and implica- 
tions of biological knowledge for the solution of important social, economic and 
medical problems. Includes special consideration of man as a living organism and 
the role of man in the biological world. Intended mainly for students not majoring 
in the sciences. 

BS 410 (ENT 410) Biology of Insects 3 (2-2) F 

(See entomology, page 330.) 

BS 480 Air Pollution Biology 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: An introductory biological course and college chemistry, junior 
standing 

The effects of air pollutants on biological systems at the subcellular, cellular, 
tissue, organ, individual and community level. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BS 500 (HI 500) The Development of Contemporary Concepts in 

Biology 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: General biology 

Selected contemporary concepts of biology are traced from their origins. Con- 
siderable attention is given to the lives of the men who have made important 
contributions to the biological sciences. 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BS 590 Special Problems in Biological Instrumentation 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

BS 690 Seminar in Cell Biology 1 (1-0) S 

BS 696 Topics in Biological Ultrastructure 1 (1-0) F 

262 



BIOMATHEMATICS 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BMA 493 Special Topics in Biomathematics 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Directed readings, problem sets, written and oral reports at an introductory level 
as dictated by need and interest of student; new 400 level courses during the devel- 
opmental phase. Staff 

BMA 501 Theoretical Biochemistry I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MA 405, CH 433, BCH 551 or consent of instructor 

Application of physical theory and mathematics to biochemistry. Examination 
of basic principles of molecular theory, reaction rate theory, statistical mechanics 
and non-equilibrium thermodynamics as applied to biochemical systems. (Offered 
fall 1973 and alternate years.) Mr. Gold 

BMA 502 Theoretical Biochemistry II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: BMA 501 

Continuation of BMA 501. Coupling of diffusion and chemical reactions. Math- 
ematical description of enzyme control, coupled sequences of enzyme reactions, 
feedback loops and oscillatory reactions. Experimentally oriented topics include 
theory of chemical relaxation and tracer dynamics. (Offered spring 1974 and 
alternate years.) Mr. Gold 

BMA 571 (MA 571, ST 571) Biomathematics I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: Advanced calculus, reasonable background in biology or consent of 
instructor 

The role of theory construction and model building in the development of experi- 
mental science. Induction vs. deduction. The historical development of mathemati- 
cal theories and models for the growth of one-species populations (logistic and 
off-shoots), including consideration of age distributions (matrix theory, Leslie and 
Lopez; continuous theory, Lotka). Some of the more elementary theories on the 
growth of organisms (von Bertalanffy, with applications to ecology; allometric 
theories, cultures grown in a chemostat). Mathematical theories of two and more 
species systems (predator-prey, competition, symbiosis; ace. to the Volterra-Lotka 
schemes, including present-day research), and discussion of some related models 
for chemical reaction kinetics. Much emphasis is placed on scrutiny of the biologi- 
cal concepts as well as of the mathematical structure of the models in order to 
uncover both weak and strong points of the models discussed. Mathematical treat- 
ment of the differential equations in these models stresses qualitative and geometric 
aspects. Mr. van der Vaart 

BMA 572 (MA 572, ST 572) Biomathematics II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: BMA 571, Elementary probability theory 

Continuation of topics of BMA 571. Some more advanced mathematical techniques 
concerning nonlinear differential equations of the types encountered in BMA 571: 
several concepts of stability, asympotic directions, periodic models. Comparison of 
deterministic and stochastic models for several biological problems, including birth 
and death processes. Certain aspects of linear system theory (time-invariant and 
variable models) used for the analysis of biological systems. Discussion of various 
applications of mathematics to biology, e.g., theories of aging, some recent research. 

Mr. van der Vaart 

BMA 591 Special Topics Maximum 3 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Directed readings, problem sets, written and oral reports as directed by need and 



263 



interest of student; new 500-level courses during the developmental phase. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BMA 691 Advanced Special Topics 1-3 F S 

BMA 694 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

BMA 699 Research Credits Arranged F S 



BOTANY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 (3-3) F S 

A survey of the types of plants and their diversities in structure, life cycle, habi- 
tat, and economic importance. Messrs. Witherspoon, VanDyke 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisite: BS 100 or BS 105 

The study of the relationships between organisms and their environment, and of 
the interaction among organisms. A balanced perspective in the basic principles of 
ecology and in their importance to man and his environment is presented. Content 
includes: ecosystems (energy flow and nutrient cycles); pollution; environment- 
organism interactions; population dynamics; interspecies ecology; communities; 
world biomes and paleoecology; and applied ecology. Staff 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 4 (3-3) F 

Prerequisite: BO 200 

A comprehensive survey of the evolutionary diversity and phylogeny of the plant 
kingdom. Emphasis is placed on the evolutionary trends and the basis for assumed 
relationships, considering fossils as well as living forms. Mr. Hardin 

BO 402 (CS 402) Economic Botany 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: BO 200 

Emphasis is on plants and human affairs, rather than on taxonomy, production, 
or economics. Discussions center on all phases of the interrelationships of the plant 
world and the life history of incipient to modern human cultures. Treatment includes 
plants and plant products, beneficial and harmful, that man has used as necessities 
of life, as ameliorants contributing to his well-being, and as raw materials for 
industry. Ornamentals are excluded. Mr. Timothy 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 4 (2-4) S 

Prerequisite: BS 100 or BO 200 

A systematic survey of vascular plants, emphasizing field identification, termin- 
ology and general evolutionary relationships. Mr. Koch 

BO 414 (ZO 414) Cell Biology 3 (3-0) F 

(See zoology, page 481.) 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisites: BS 100 or BO 200, one year of college chemistry 

Physiology of the green plant emphasizing plant organization, water and solute 
relationships, organic and inorganic nutrition, growth and development. 

Messrs. Blum, Noggle, Troyer 

264 



BO 499 Independent Study in Botany 1-3 F S 

Prerequisites: At least 8 hours of botany, advanced standing, and presentation of 
plan of work approved by a faculty member 

Discussions, library research, field, or laboratory investigations of topics of 
particular interests to students under the direction of a faculty member on a 
tutorial basis. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Staff 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy 4 (2-6) F 

Prerequisite: BO 200 

A study of the cells, tissues and organs of common flowering plants and gymno- 
sperms. Growth and differentiation patterns will be considered with emphasis on 
current research. (Offered fall, 1974.) Mr. Anderson 

BO 522 Advanced Morphology and Phylogeny of Seed Plants 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisite: BO 403 

A comprehensive survey of the morphology and evolution of angiosperms and 
gymnosperms. Special emphasis is given to detailed vegetative and reproductive 
morphology of fossil and living forms, and to their presumed evolutionary relation- 
ships. (Offered spring, 1974 and alternate years.) Mr. Hardin 

BO 524 Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes 4 (2-6) F 

Prerequisite: BO 403 

A course dealing with three large, economically and ecologically important plant 
families. A working familiarity with these three groups will be achieved through 
an introduction to the special terminology used in dealing with these plants, ex- 
tensive field work emphasizing keying out plants collected, and a study of the 
recently developed modern classification of the grasses. (Offered fall, 1973 and 
alternate years.) Mr. Koch 

BO 544 Plant Geography 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: BO 403, BO 360, GN 411, or equivalents 

A course in descriptive and interpretive plant geography, synthesizing data from 
the fields of ecology, genetics, geography, paleobotany and taxonomy. The course 
will include a survey of the present distribution of major vegetation types through- 
out the world, a discussion of the history and development of this present pattern 
of vegetation, and a discussion of the principles and theories of plant geography. 
(Offered spring, 1973 and alternate years.) Mr. Cooper 



BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: General botany or biology, and biochemistry 

The first half of a two-semester sequence covering the current status of plant 
physiology. Topics will include plant organization, metabolism, water relations, 
solute relations, photobiology and respiration. Mr. Troyer 

BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: General botany or biology, and biochemsitry 

The second half of a two-semester sequence covering the current status of 
plant physiology. Topics will include inorganic nutrition, nitrogen assimilation, 
plant growth substances, physiology of seeds, vegetative growth, reproductive 
growth, aging and senescence. Messrs. Blum, Troyer 



265 



BO 553 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology I 1 (0-3) F 
Prerequisite or corequisite: BO 551 

Laboratory to accompany BO 551. Laboratory procedures in plant nutrition, 

plant structure and composition, water relations, respiration. Mr. Troyer 

BO 554 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology II 1 (0-3) S 

Prerequisite or corequisite: BO 552 

Laboratory to accompany BO 552. Laboratory procedures in enzymes, photo- 
synthesis, photobiology, plant growth substances. Messrs. Blum, Troyer 

BO 560 (ZO 560) Principles of Ecology 4 (3-3) F 

(See zoology, page 484.) 

BO 561 Physiological Ecology 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisites: BO 421, BO (ZO 560), or equivalents 

This course will approach the plant community from a physiological standpoint. 
Emphasis will be placed on the individual in the community and how it responds to 
its immediate environment on a short- and long-term basis. (Offered spring 1973 
and alternate years). Mr. Blum 

BO 574 (MB 574) Phycology 3 (1-4) S 

Prerequisite: BS 100 or BO 200 

An introduction to the classes of algae. The systematic position, life history and 
ecology of important genera in the local flora, both fresh-water and marine, are 
emphasized. Mr. Schlichting 

BO 575 (MB 575, PP 575) The Fungi 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: BO 200 or equivalent 

An overview of the fungi within the framework of a survey of the major classes. 
Lectures while covering the major groups systematically will also include ancillary 
material on such aspects as ultrastructure, environmental adaptations, sexuality, 
ontogeny and economic, including historical, importance. Mr. Moore 

BO 576 (MB 576, PP 576) The Fungi— Laboratory 1 (0-3) S 
Corequisite: BO 575 

The course will provide illustrative material of the fungal assemblages dis- 
cussed in BO 575. Mr. Moore 

BO 590 Topical Problems 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Discussions and readings on problems of current interest in the fields of ecology, 
anatomy and morphology, taxonomy, and cell biology. May be repeated, with change 
in topic, for a maximum of six credits. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BO 612 Plant Morphogenesis 4 (3-3) S 

BO 620 Advanced Taxonomy 3 (2-2) S 

BO 625 (PP 625) Advanced Mycology 4 (2-6) F 

BO 631 Water Relations of Plants 3 (3-0) S 

BO 633 Plant Growth and Development 3 (3-0) S 

BO 634 Introduction to the Thermodynamics of Biological Systems 3 (3-0) S 

266 



BO 636 Discussions in Plant Physiology 1 (1-0) F S 

BO 660 (ZO 660) Advanced Topics in Ecology I 4 (3-3) S 

BO 661 (ZO 661) Advanced Topics in Ecology II 4 (3-3) S 

BO 691 Botany Seminar 1 d-0) F S 

BO 693 Special Problems in Botany Credits Arranged F S 

BO 699 Research Credits Arranged F S 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: CH 107, MA 201 

The primary emphasis of the course is the chemical interactions of matter and 
the physical interactions of multiphase system. The course introduces engineer- 
ing methods of treating material balances, stoichiometry, thermophysics, thermo- 
chemistry and first law thermodynamics. Mr. Hopfenberg 

CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisite: PY 208 
Corequisite: MA 301 

Physical measurement of importance in chemical engineering. Temperature, 
pressure pH, concentration, etc. including dynamic response of measuring elements. 
Control element, electronic, pneumatic, etc. Introduction to Process Control. 

Mr. Martin 

CHE 300 Chemical Technology and the Environment 3 (3-0) F 

The course is intended to provide a basis for informed judgment regarding appro- 
priate political, economic, and technical means to prevent and control pollution. 
The emphasis is on chemical technology, both as a source of pollution and as a 
necessary means for pollution control. The course is intended for students with 
no background in engineering, but is open to all. Mr. Hopfenberg 

CHE 301, 302 Elements of Chemical Engineering 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 212 (for CHE 301) CHE 301 (for CHE 302) 

An introduction to principles of chemical engineering including calculations 
involved in industrial processes and equipment. The course is designed for students 
not majoring in chemical engineering. Mr. Bright 

CHE 311 Transport Processes I 3 (2-2) F S 

Prerequisites: MA 301, PY 208, CHE 205 

An introduction to momentum, heat and mass transport processes, with emphasis 
on chemical engineering. Problems in fluid dynamics and heat transfer. 

Mr. Rousseau 

CHE 315 Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: CH 431, CHE 205, MA 301 

A study of the laws of thermodynamics and their application to chemical engi- 
neering problems, both in theory and in practice. Criteria of equilibrium in physical 
and chemical changes. Behavior of real fluids, including mixtures. Mr. Beatty 

267 



CHE 316 Thermodynamics of Chemical and Phase Equilibria 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 315 

Thermodynamics is the principal tool for systematic study of chemical reaction 
equilibria and phase equilibrium. The concepts of fugacity, activity, and chemical 
potential as methods, for predicting the effect of temperature, pressure, etc. on 
equilibrium compositions will be studied in considerable detail. Methods for mea- 
suring and estimating thermodynamic properties important to equilibrium calcula- 
tion in real systems will be included. Mr. Beatty 

CHE 325 Introduction to Plastics 3 (3-0) F S 
Prerequisite: CH 103 

A general survey of plastics and polymers. Emphasis is on types, applications, 

fabrication, processing and testing. Mr. Seely 

CHE 327 Separation Processes I 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 311 

An application of the principles of transport phenomena to the unit operations of 
absorption, extraction, distillation, drying, filtration, etc. with emphasis on design 
procedures and economic consideration. Mr. Schoenborn 

CHE 412 Transport Processes II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 327 

An intensive study of momentum, heat and mass transport processes, with empha- 
sis on chemical engineering. Problems in fluid, heat and mass transfer. 

Mr. Ferrell 

CHE 425 Process Measurement and Control I 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisites: CHE 225, CHE 327 

A study of the continuous control of typical chemical engineering processes 
including the techniques of feedback, cascade, feedforward and interacting systems. 
Dynamics, stability, and control of heat exchangers, flow systems, distillation col- 
umns and chemical reactors are illustrated. Mr. Martin 

CHE 426 Process Measurement and Control II 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 425 or EE 435 or MAE 435 

An extension of the theory and application of process control techniques to the 
analysis of physical systems. This course covers sampled data and non linear 
systems and includes an introduction to optimum control techniques and adaptive 
control. Mr. Martin 

CHE 428 Separation Processes II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 327 

An intensive study of the principles (diffusion and interphase mass transfer) 
underlying such unit operations as distillation, drying, absorption, etc., with em- 
phasis on procedures and economic problems. Mr. Schoenborn 

CHE 431 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I 3 (1-5) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 311 

Laboratory work on typical apparatus involving unit operations. Experiments 
are designed to augment the theoi'y and data of lecture courses and to develop 
proficiency in the writing of technical reports. Mr. Seely 

CHE 432 Chemical Engineering Laboratory II 3 (1-5) F 

Prerequisite: CHE 431 

A continuation of CHE 431. This course will consist of a small number of group 
projects in research, design or development. Mr. Seely 



268 



CHE 446 Chemical Process Kinetics 3 (3-0) F 
Prerequisite: CHE 315 

A basic study of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions, and of 

catalysis. Mr. Stahel 

CHE 451 Chemical Engineering Design 3 (2-2) F S 

Prerequisites: CHE 315, CHE 327, CHE 432 

A general treatment of chemical process design and optimization. The interplay 
of economic and technical factors in process development, site selection, project 
design, construction and production management. Applications of cost accounting, 
cost estimation for new equipment, measures of profitability. Case studies, readings, 
design problems and reports. Mr. Marsland 

CHE 465 (BAE 465) Introduction to Biomedical Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MA 202 or MA 212, PY 212 or PY 221 

An introduction to certain engineering concepts and to their quantitative applica- 
tion to biomedical problems such as flow in the cardiovascular and respiratory 
systems; transfer of thermal energy in and from warm-blooded animals; transport 
of materials through physiological tissues and membranes, and performance of 
organ replacement and assist devices such as the artificial kidney and the intra- 
aortic balloon. Mr. Beatty 

CHE 495 Seminar in Chemical Engineering 1 (1-0) F S 
One semester required of seniors in chemical engineering. 

Professional aspects of chemical engineering; topics of current interest in 

chemical engineering. Staff 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects 1-3 F S 

Elective for seniors in chemical engineering. 

Introduction to research through experimental, theoretical and literature studies 
of chemical engineering problems. Oral and written presentation of reports. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 511 Problem Analysis for Chemical Engineers 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: CHE 428, MA 301 

The application of the methods of mathematical analysis to the formulation and 
solution of problems in transport phenomena, transient phenomena in unit opera- 
tions, process dynamics and thermodynamics. Study and use of analog computer 
solutions of these problems. Mr. Ferrell 

CHE 513 Thermodynamics I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CHE 315 

An intermediate course in thermodynamic principles and their application to 
chemical and phase equilibria. The course is largely from a macroscopic viewpoint, 
but consideration will be given to some aspects of the statistical viewpoint. 

Mr. Beatty 

CHE 515 Transport Phenomena 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 327 

A theoretical study of transport of momentum, energy and matter with empha- 
sis on the latter two. The diffusional operations, including coupled heat and mass 
transfer, are introduced in the light of the theory. Mr. Marsland 

CHE 517 Kinetics and Catalysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CHE 446 

An intensive study of homogeneous and heterogeneous kinetic reactions. Empha- 

269 



sis will be placed on fundamental approaches, experimental methods and mathe- 
matical techniques in engineering analysis of chemical reaction systems. 

Mr. Stahel 

CHE 521 Mass Transfer Operations 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CHE 327 or equivalent 

Multicomponent mass transfer operations will be discussed in light of recent 
developments and innovations in both the operations themselves and in calcula- 
tional techniques used in analyzing the operations. The equilibrium stage concept 
will be developed and as time permits, a discussion of the continuous rate processes 
will be undertaken. Problems unique to given operations, such as are encountered 
in extractive and azeotropic distillation will be discussed during the course. 

Mr. Rousseau 

CHE 523 Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CHE 311 

Convective heat transfers in chemical process equipment, such as heat exchangers, 
chemical reactors, distillation and extraction l-eboilers, etc., and fluid dynamics 
and heat transfer of multiphase, multicomponent and chemically reactive systems. 

Mr. Ferrell 

CHE 525 Process Dynamics 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CHE 425 

A detailed study of the dynamic response of typical chemical process equipment 
including instrumentation and process control devices. Fundamental concepts of 
automatic control of process variables such as temperature, pressure, flow and 
liquid level. Mr. Martin 

CHE 527 (OR 527) Optimization of Engineering Processes 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 511, CSC 111 or equivalent 

Mathematical methods for the optimization of engineering processes are devel- 
oped, and illustrative applications of these methods are presented and discussed. 
Specific topics covered are drawn from a list which includes mathematical pro- 
gramming, geometric programming, sensitivity analysis, direct search and elimina- 
tion techniques, variational techniques and the minimum principle, quasilineari- 
zation and dynamic programming. The emphasis throughout the course is on appli- 
cations of the techniques discussed rather than fully rigorous development of the 
theory. Mr. Felder 

CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air Pollution Control Systems 3 (3-2) S 
Prerequisites: MAE 409, CE 576, or equivalent first course 

Principles and practice in designing equipment for the abatement of air pollu- 
tion; estimation of capital cost and operating expense; economic optimization under 
various kinds of tax laws. Mr. Marsland 

CHE 540 Electrochemical Engineering 3 (3-0) S 
Prerequisite - Physical chemistry 

The application of electrochemical principles to such topics as electrolysis, 

electroanalysis, electroplating, metal refining, etc. Mr. Shoenborn 

THE 541 Cellulose Industries 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Organic chemistry 

Methods of manufacture and application of cellulose chemical conversion products. 
Kmphasis is placed on recent developments in the field of synthetic fibers, films, 
lacquers and other cellulose compounds. Mr. Seely 



270 



CHE 543 Technology of Plastics 3 (3-0) S 
Prerequisite: Organic chemistry 

The properties, methods of manufacture and applications of synthetic resins. 

Recent developments in the field are stressed. Mr. Schoenborn 

CHE 561 Biomedical Engineering I: Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer 3 (3-0) S 
Prerequisite: CHE 465 (BAE 465), or equivalent background 

The extension of fluid flow and heat transfer concepts to biomedical engineering 
is presented along with the grounding in physiology requisite to proper modeling of 
mammalian flow and thermal processes. Cardiovascular blood flow, pulmonary air 
flow and heat flow in temperature regulation are subjected to critical engineering 
analysis. Flows in the urinary, alimentary and lymphatic systems and in extra- 
corporeal assist devices including the heart-lung machine and artificial kidney are 
also studied. Mr. Beatty 

CHE 569 (TC 569) Polymers, Surfactants and Collodial Materials 3 (3-0) F 
Prerequisites: CHE 315, CH 431, CH 223 

A survey of the relationship between molecular structure and bulk properties of 
nonmetallic materials as applied in chemical engineering processes. Special 
attention will be directed to the application of surface and colloid chemistry as well 
as polymer science. Mr. Hopfenberg 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

A laboratory study of some phase of chemical engineering or allied field. 

Staff 

CHE 598 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Study and investigation of special topics in chemical engineering. The course 
may consist of directed reading of the literature of chemical engineering, introduc- 
tion to research methodology, special topics of current interest, seminar discussions 
dealing with special topics, etc. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CHE 611 Chemical Process Design and Simulation 3 (3-0) S 

CHE 613 Thermodynamics II 3 (3-0) F 

CHE 617 Chemical Reaction Engineering 3 (3-0) S 

CHE 621 Advanced Mass Transfer 3 (3-0) F 

CHE 623 Advanced Fluid Dynamics 3 (3-0) S 

CHE 624 Advanced Heat Transfer 3 (3-0) F 

CHE 669 (TC 669) Diffusion in Polymers 2 (2-0) S 

CHE 671 (TC 671) Special Topics in Polymer Science 1-3 F 

CHE 693 Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering 1-3 F S 

CHE 695 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

CHE 699 Research Credits Arranged F S 



271 



CHEMISTRY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 101 General Chemistry I 4 (3-3) F S 

Fundamental concepts in chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, 
states of aggregation of matter, chemical reactions and stoichiometry. Should be 
followed by CH 103, CH 105 or CH 107. 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

A continuation of CH 101, designed as a terminal course in chemistry and for 
students in curricula which do not require full-year chemistry courses beyond the 
freshman level. The major part of the course is devoted to descriptive inorganic, 
organic and nuclear chemistry. 

CH 104 Experimental Chemistry 1 (0-3) F S 

Corequisite: CH 105 

A laboratory course to supplement the lecture course CH 105. Required for stu- 
dents who take CH 105 and who intend to take additional chemistry courses. 

CH 105 Chemistry — Principles and Applications 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

A continuation of CH 101, intended primarily for engineering students, with 
emphasis on introductory chemical thermodynamics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, 
chemical kinetics, and the application of basic chemical principles to the treatment 
of organic and inorganic systems. CH 105 will serve as a prerequisite for additional 
chemistry courses only if accompanied by CH 104. 

CH 106 Laboratory Techniques I 1 (0-3) F 

Corequisite: CH 101 

Laboratory work to supplement the laboratory of CH 101. 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisite: CH 101 with a grade of C or better 

A continuation of CH 101, designed for students who plan to take full-year 
courses in advanced chemistry and for any qualified student desiring a more quan- 
titative course than CH 103. The major part of the course is devoted to the detailed 
quantitative aspects of stoichiometry, kinetics, equilibrium and electrochemistry, 
and the treatment of chemical reactions in terms of acid-base concepts. 

CH 108 Laboratory Techniques II 1 (0-3) S 

Corequisite: CH 107 

Laboratory work to supplement the laboratory of CH 107, including some 
elementary quantitative analysis and inorganic preparations. 

CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry 5 (5-0) F S 

A one-semester course in general chemistry designed primarily for students in 
liberal arts. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodic classification, 
gas laws, chemical equilibrium, and elementary descriptive inorganic and organic 
chemistry. 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisites: CH 103 or CH 107, or CH 104 and CH 105 

An introduction to the fundamental principles of organic chemistry included in 
the study of the hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, acids and their 

272 



derivatives, esters, phenols, fats, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins and a 
selected group of natural and synthetic products. 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisite: CH 107 

CH 221 and CH 223 cover the fundamentals of organic chemistry, including both 
aliphatic and aromatic compounds. 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisite: CH 221 
A continuation of CH 221. 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisites: CH 103 or CH 107, or CH 104 and CH 105 

A one-semester course in volumetric and gravimetric analysis including 
techniques, stoichiometry and principles of neutralization, oxidation-reduction and 
precipitation methods. 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisites: CH 103 or CH 107, or CH 104 and CH 105; MA 102 or MA 112 

Designed for students whose background in mathematics is not sufficient to meet 
the requirements of CH 431, CH 433, but who desire instruction on chemical prin- 
ciples in addition to that provided at the freshman level. 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry 3 (3-0) S 

Corequisite: CH 433 

A survey of the chemical elements based on atomic structure and the periodic 
system, also introducing newer concepts of structure and symmetry. A knowledge 
of basic physical chemical principles is prerequisite. 

CH 411 Analytical Chemistry I 4 (2-6) F 

Prerequisites: CH 431, CH 434 

An introduction to analytical chemistry, including the design, execution and 
interpretation of quantitative chemical measurements. Chromatographic, gravi- 
metric and related techniques of separation are presented. 

CH 413 Analytical Chemistry II 4 (2-6) S 

Prerequisite: CH 411 

Methods of quantitative analysis based on solution chemisty, electrochemistry 
and the interactions of radiation with matter. Specific topics include acid-base, 
potentiometric, and coulometric titrations, and absorption spectroscopy. 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis 3 (1-6) F S 

Prerequisite: CH 223 

An introduction to the identification of organic compounds by means of physical 
properties (including infrared spectra), chemical classification tests and prepara- 
tion of derivatives. 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: CH 107, MA 202, PY 203 or PY 208 
Corequisite: MA 301 

CH 431, CH 433 and CH 435 provide an intensive study of physical chemical 
principles. CH 431 emphasizes states of matter, thermodynamics, and physical 
and chemical equilibrium. 

CH 432 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory 1 (0-3) F 

Corequisite: CH 431 

Laboratory course to accompany the lecture work in CH 431. 

273 



CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: CH 431, MA 301 

A continuation of CH 431, emphasizing properties of solids and solutions, electro- 
chemistry, reaction kinetics and kinetic theory. 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory 2 (0-6) S 

Corequisite: CH 433 

A project-oriented course designed to acquaint chemistry students with the 
techniques of modern physical chemistry. 

CH 435 Physical Chemistry III 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: CH 431, MA 301 

A continuation of CH 431, emphasizing molecular structure and chemical 
bonding. 

CH 441 Colloid Chemistry 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: CH 220, CH 315 

Adsorption, preparation, properties, constitution, stability and application of 
sols, gels, emulsions, foams and aerosols; dialysis; Dor nan membrane equilibrium. 
(Offered spring 1973 and alternate years.) 

CH 461 (TC 461) Chemistry of Fibers 3 (3-0) F 

(See textile chemistry, page 467.) 

CH 490 Chemical Preparations 3 (1-6) F S 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry 

Lectures and laboratory work in preparative chemistry. Synthetic procedures will 
be selected to illustrate advanced methods and techniques in both inorganic and 
organic chemistry. 

CH 491 Reading in Honors Chemistry 2-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry 

A reading course for exceptionally able students at the senior level. The students 
will do extensive reading in areas of advanced chemistry and will present written 
reports of their findings. 

CH 493 Chemical Literature 1 (1-0) F 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry 

A systematic introduction to the location and retrieval of information required 
for the solution of chemical problems. 

CH 495 Special Topics in Chemistry 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Designed to serve needs not covered by existing courses. 

CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry Arranged 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry 

An introduction to research. Independent investigation of a research problem 
under the supervision of a member of the chemistry faculty. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 501 Inorganic Chemistry I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

Modern inorganic chemistry from the point of view of the chemical bond. Chemi- 
cal periodicity and its origins in atomic structure, the ionic bond and electro- 

274 



negativity, crystal structure and bonding in ionic solids, the metallic state, 
conduction and semiconductors, and the preparation and properties of illustrative 
compounds. 

CH 503 Inorganic Chemistry II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CH 501 

The hydrogen molecule-ion and the theory of the covalent bond, molecular, 
orbitals and hybridization, dipole moments and magnetic properties, the theory of 
acids and bases, nonaqueous solvents, coordination compounds, carbonyl and quasi- 
aromatic compounds, and the chemistry of the transition metals, lanthanides and 
actinides. 

CH 511 Chemical Spectroscopy 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

Theory, analytical applications and interpretation of spectra as applied to 
chemical problems. Major emphasis will be placed upon ultraviolet, visible and 
infrared spectra. 

CH 515 Chemical Instrumentation 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CH 431 
Corequisite: CH 411 

Basic electronic components and circuits, the response of laboratory instruments, 
design and modification of typical electronic control and measurement systems. 
Emphasis will be placed on the transducers and control elements utilized in chemi- 
cal research. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) 

CH 521 Advanced Organic Chemistry I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: CH 223, CH 433 or CH 435 

Structure, stereochemistry and reactions of the various classes of hydrocarbons. 
The molecular orbital treatment of bonding and reactivity of alkenes, the con- 
formational interpretation of cycloalkane and cycloalkene reactivity, and the 
application of optical isomerism to the study of reaction mechanisms will be 
emphasized. 

CH 523 Advanced Organic Chemistry II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CH 521 

An introduction to acid-base theory and mechanistic organic chemistry as applied 
to synthetically useful organic reactions. 

CH 525 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: CH 223, CH 433 or CH 435 

Application of physical methods to the solutions of structural problems in organic 
chemistry. Emphasis will be on spectral methods, including infrared, ultraviolet, 
nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, 
X-ray and electron diffraction, and optical rotatory dispersion. 

CH 531 Chemical Thermodynamics 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301 

An extension of elementary principles to the treatment of ideal and real gases, 
ideal solutions, electrolytic solutions, galvanic cells, surface systems, and irrevers- 
ible processes. An introduction to statistical thermodynamics and the estimation of 
thermodynamic functions from spectroscopic data. 

CH 533 Chemical Kinetics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301 

An intensive survey of the basic principles of chemical kinetics with emphasis on 
experimental and mathematical techniques, elements of the kinetic theory, and 

275 



theory of the transition state. Applications to gas reactions, reactions in solution, 
and mechanism studies. 

CH 535 Surface Phenomena 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301 

An intensive survey of the topics of current interest in surface phenomena. 
Formulations of basic theories are presented together with illustrations of their 
current applications. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) 

CH 537 Quantum Chemistry 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: MA 301, CH 435 or PY 407 

The elements of wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and time 
dependent phenomena. Applications of quantum theory to chemistry, particularly 
chemical bonds. 

CH 545 Radiochemistry 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: CH 431 or PY 410 

The applications of radioactivity to chemistry and the applications of chemistry 
to the radioactive elements, particularly the transuranium elements and fission 
products. 

CH 562 (TC 562) Physical Chemistry of High Polymers — 

Bulk Properties 3 (3-0) F 

(See textile chemistry, page 467.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CH 623 Valence and the Structure of Organic Molecules 3 (3-0) F 

CH 625 Organic Reaction Mechanisms 3 (3-0) S 

CH 627 Chemistry of Metal-Organic Compounds 3 (3-0) F 

CH 631 Chemical Thermodynamics II 3 (3-0) S 

CH 659 (BCH 659) Natural Products 3 (3-0) F 

CH 691 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

CH 693 Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry 3 (3-0) F S 

CH 695 Special Topics in Chemistry Maximum 3 F S 

CH 699 Chemical Research Credits Arranged F S 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 201 Engineering Measurements in Surveying 3 (2-3) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

Not for civil engineering or civil engineering-construction option students. 

The general theory of engineering measurement, errors, significant figures, 
repeated observations, precision ratios and accuracy of measurements are presented. 
Other lecture topics include horizontal and vertical control, stadia theory, concepts 
of area measurements, elements of simple curves, photogrammetry and intro- 
duction to machine computation. 

276 



CE 202 Introduction to Civil Engineering 2 (1-3) F 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

An introduction to civil engineering through the use of computers to solve typical 
problems in each subject area. 

CE 301 Engineering Surveying 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: CE 202 

The principles and applications of engineering surveying in solving civil 
engineering problems in planning, design and construction; including horizontal 
and vertical control; topographic maps, photogrammetry and elements of geodesy. 

CE 305 Transportation Engineering I 4 (3-2) S 

Prerequisite: CE 301 

An integrated approach to the planning, design and operation of transportation 
systems. Engineering and economic aspects of the basic transport modes, including 
highway, rail, water and air facilities, are investigated from the viewpoint of the 
civil engineer. 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

Stress analysis of statically determinate beams and framed structures under 
fixed and moving loads; analysis of displacements by methods of conjugate beam 
and virtual work; indeterminate structural analysis of both rigid frames and 
trusses by virtual work and by stiffness method. 

CE 326 Structural Engineering I 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisite: CE 325 

Fundamental principles of elastic, inelastic and ultimate strength analysis and 
proportioning of structural members in metal, concrete and timber. 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: MAT 200 

Manufacture and properties of calcareous and bituminous cements and mineral 
aggregates. Mechanical properties of the following structural materials: Portland 
cement concrete, bituminous concrete, masonry materials and timber. Materials 
testing for research. 

CE 342 Soil Engineering I 4 (3-2) S 

Prerequisite: CE 332 

Soil properties and mechanics of analysis related to foundation investigations. 
Includes soil identification, index properties, effective stress concepts, settlement 
analysis, evaluation of shear strength and bearing capacity, and fundamentals of 
foundation selection and design. 

CE 365 Construction Engineering I 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

A construction operations course with emphasis on the organization of the con- 
struction industry; construction methods, equipment, productivity and safety; 
project planning, scheduling and control. 

CE 370 Elements of Environmental Hygiene 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

An introductory study of environmental factors affecting human health and their 
evaluation and control. Topics to be discussed include: water supplies; sewage dis- 
posal; swimming pool and refuse sanitation; insect and rodent control; milk and 
food sanitation; the physical factors of noise, heat, illumination, and ionizing 
radiation; housing; industrial hygiene; and environmental hygiene programs. 



277 



CE 382 Hydraulics 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

Properties of fluid, laws of conservation of mass, momentum and energy; appli- 
cations to the mechanics of flow through pipes and channels; fluid measurements; 
theory of design and characteristics of hydraulic machines. 

CE 383 Water Resources Engineering I 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisite: CE 382 

The study of the application of natural science, physics and chemistry in the 
engineering or urban water and waste systems. Case studies are utilized to illus- 
trate the applications and the relationship of these systems to the management of 
environmental quality in urban areas. 

CE 406 Transportation Engineering II 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: CE 305 

An extension of Transportation Engineering I with particular emphasis on urban 
transportation problems and the actual design of modal interfaces such as air- 
ports, shopping centers, parking garages, port facilities and other multimodal 
terminals. 

CE 415 (ARC 415) Architectural Structures I 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: EM 316 (ARC 316) 

Not open to civil engineering students. 

Fundamental concepts underlying the behavior of statically determinate building 
systems; investigation of the design and construction techniques used in steel and 
timber framing. Lectures will present concepts and methods; workshops will provide 
an opportunity for application and exploration of lecture material. 

CE 416 (ARC 416) Architectural Structures II 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: CE 415 (ARC 415) 

Not open to civil engineering students. 

Fundamental concepts underlying the behavior, analysis, and design of statically 
indeterminate building systems; investigation of the design and construction tech- 
niques used in framing, analysis procedures for indeterminate structural elements; 
application of design with emphasis on reinforced concrete construction. A termi- 
nal design project provides an opportunity for a synthesis of the four semester 
structures sequence. Lectures will present concepts and methods; workshops will 
provide an opportunity for application and exploration of lecture material. 

CE 425 Intermediate Structural Analysis 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CE 325 

A rigorous treatment, at intermediate level, of indeterminate structural analysis. 
Coverage includes energy principles, force and displacement methods and special 
topics. 

CE 427 Structural Engineering II 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: CE 326 

Basic concepts of structural design. Criteria for safety and serviceability. Struc- 
tural connections. Analysis and design of complete structural systems. 

CE 443 Soil Engineering II 3(3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CE 342 

Lateral earth pressure theories and their application to analysis and design of 
slopes and retaining structures; ground water hydraulics; placement of fills; soil 
behavior in pavement systems, stabilization techniques. 



278 



CE 450 Civil Engineering Design 3 (1-6) S 

Prerequisite: One from the following: CE 406, CE 427, CE 443 or CE 484 

An integrated team approach is used to a major civil engineering project in- 
volving planning, design and analysis under realistic conditions including considera- 
tion of environmental factors. 

CE 460 Construction Engineering Project 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: CE 463, CE 466 

A study of the planning, design, construction and management of a construc- 
tion project. 

CE 463 Cost Analysis and Control 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: CE 365 

Principles of cost engineering, project estimating, bid procedures, construction 
cost analysis and control. 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Legal aspects of construction contract documents and specifications; owner- 
engineer-contractor relationships and responsibilities; bids and contract per- 
formance; labor laws. 

CE 466 Construction Engineering II 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: CE 326, CE 365 

An introduction to construction of building systems, with emphasis on the plan- 
ning, analysis, design and construction of structural subsystems. 

CE 472 Elements of Air Quality Management 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: College level physics and senior standing 

Pollution is studied from the standpoint of community air quality management. 
Topics to be discussed include: pollutant sources; effects on biological systems, 
materials, and the atmosphere; meteorological factors; air sampling; abatement 
and control techniques; air quality and emission standards; and legal, economic, 
and administrative aspects. 

CE 484 Water Resources Engineering II 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CE 383 

The study of the occurrence, flow and control of natural and impounded waters. 
Case studies of storm drainage, flood control and stream sanitation are utilized to 
illustrate the use of these principles in the management of river basin water 
resources. 

CE 487 (OY 487, MAS 487) Physical Oceanography 3 (3-0) S 

(See physical oceanography, page 420.) 

CE 498 Special Problems in Civil Engineering 1-3 F S 

Prerequisites: Senior standing in civil engineering or civil engineering-construc- 
tion option 

Study and investigation of special problems in some phase of civil engineering. 
The course may consist of directed reading in the literature of civil engineering, 
introduction to research methodology, seminar discussions, dealing with special 
civil engineering topics of current interest. 



279 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I 3 (2-3) F S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Principles and concepts for engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, includ- 
ing analysis of soils and surface drainage characteristics. 

CE 508 Airphoto Analysis II 3(2-3) S 

Prerequisite: CE 507 

Continuation of CE 507 with applications to highway and airport projects. 

CE 509 Photogrammetry 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: CE 201 or CE 301 

Elements of aerial photogrammetry as applied to civil engineering, surveying 
and mapping, geometry of aerial photographs, flight planning for aerial photo- 
graphy and stereoscopic plotter instruments, especially the Kelsh Plotter. 

CE 514 Muniq pal Engineering Projects 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in civil engineering 

Special problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban planning and 
city engineering. 

CE 515 Transportation Operations 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CE 305 

The analysis of traffic and transportation engineering operations. 

CE 516 Transportation Design 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: CE 305 

The geometric elements of traffic and transportation engineering design. 

CE 517 Water Transportation 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CE 305 

The planning, design, construction and operation of waterways, ports, harbors 
and related facilities. Development of analytical techniques for evaluating the 
feasibility of piers, ports and multipurpose river basin projects. The design of 
marine structures and civil works that are significant in civil engineering, includ- 
ing locks, dams, harbors, ports and contractive and protective works. 

CE 524 Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures 3 (3-0) F 

Corequisite: CE 427 

Theory and design of masonry arches, culverts, dams, foundations and masonry 
walls subjected to lateral loads. 

CE 525 Matrix Structural Analysis I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Matrix methods of structural analysis for digital computer solutions for 
general plane frames, trusses, and grids as well as general three dimensional 
trusses and frames. Inclusion of effects due to prestrain, temperature, elastic 
stability functions, joint deformations, and support settlements. Introduction to 
finite-element analysis of plane elasticity problems. 

CE 526 Matrix Structural Analysis II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CE 326 

A study in depth of classical structural theories, including generalized stiffness 
and flexibility methods. Treatment of secondary stresses and highrise structures. 



280 



CE 531 Structural Models 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Dimensional analysis and structural similitude, indirect and direct models, 
model materials and experimental techniques, individual project in structural model 
analysis. 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Theory of plastic behavior of steel structures; concept of design for ultimate 
load and the use of load factors. Analysis and design of components of steel 
frames including bracing and connections. 

CE 536 Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

The principles and concepts of design in prestressed concrete including elastic 
and ultimate strength analyses for flexural, shear, bond and deflection. Principles 
of concordancy and linear transformation for indeterminate prestressed structures. 
Application of prestressing to tanks and shells. 

CE 541 (MAS 541, OY 541) Gravity Wave Theory I 3 (3-0) S 

(See marine sciences, page 373.) 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CE 342 

Subsoil investigations; excavations; design of sheeting and bracing systems; 
control of water; footing, grillage and pile foundations; caisson and cofferdam 
methods of construction. 

CE 547 Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

Physical and mechanical properties of soils governing their use for engineering 
purposes; stress relations and applications to a variety of fundamental 
problems. 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: CE 342 

The study of soil properties that are significant in earthwork engineering, in- 
cluding properties of soil solids, basic physiochemical concepts, classification, 
identification, plasticity, permeability, capillarity, and stabilization. Laboratory 
work includes classification, permeability and compaction tests. 

CE 549 Engineering Properties of Soils II 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: CE 548 

Continuation of CE 548, including the study of compressibility, stress-strain 
relations and shear strength theories for soil. Laboratory work includes con- 
solidation and shear strength tests. 

CE 551 Theory of Concrete Mixtures 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CE 332 

Course work consists of study in depth of the theory of portland cement concrete 
mixtures including technology development and published research. Study in- 
cludes types and properties of portland and special cements including chemical 
reactions; brief examination of history of mixture design; detailed study of 
current design methods including water-cement ratio, fineness modulus, B/Bo, 
American Concrete Institute, and Portland Cement Association procedures; pro- 
perties of fresh and hardened concretes; strength-age-curing relationships, dur- 
ability; admixtures; special concretes; production; and quality control. 



281 



CE 553 Asphalt and Bituminous Materials 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: CE 332 

Course work consists of study in depth of propei'ties of asphalts and tars for use 
in waterproofing and bituminous materials and study of the theories of design of 
bituminous mixtures for construction and paving uses. Study includes types and 
properties of asphalt cements, cutbacks, emulsions, blown asphalts and tars; 
brief examination of historical developments: detailed study of bituminous mix- 
ture design; properties of bituminous mixtures; and current research. Laboi'a- 
tory work includes standard tests on asphalts, tars, and road oils; design, manu- 
facture and testing of trial batches; and current research techniques. 

CE 555 Highway and Airport Pavement Design 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: CE 406 or CE 443 

Theoretical analysis and design of highway airport pavements with critical 
evaluation of current design practices. 

CE 570 (BAE 570, MB 570) Sanitary Microbiology 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: MB 401 or equivalent 

Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry are presented and related 
to problems of stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological treatment. Labora- 
tory exercises present basic microbiological techniques and illustrate from a 
chemical viewpoint some of the basic microbial aspects of waste disposal. 

CE 571 Theory of Water and Waste Treatment 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Study of the physical, chemical and biological principles underlying water and 
waste treatment processes; including diffusion of gases, solubility, equilibrium and 
ionization, aerobic and anaerobic stabilization processes, sludge conditioning and 
disposal. 

CE 572 Unit Operations and Processes in Wastes Engineering 3 (1-6) S 

Prerequisite: CE 571 

Processes and operations in wastes engineering; including sedimentation, co- 
agulation, filtration, adsorption, biological treatments, softening and new devel- 
opments. 

CE 573 Analysis of Water and Wastes 3 (1-6) F 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Chemical and physical analysis of water and wastes and interpretation of results. 

CE 574 (NE 574) Environmental Consequences of Nuclear Power 3 (3-0) S 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

In this course, the environmental consequences resulting from the siting, con- 
struction and operation of nuclear power plants are encountered. An understanding 
is sought of why more power plants are needed and of the environmental conse- 
quences of alternatives to nuclear power. Fuel sources; fuel reprocessing; sources 
and treatment of solid, liquid, gaseous wastes; the costs of minimizing wastes and 
the effects of rejected heat; beneficial uses of rejected heat; pertinent federal and 
state regulations are examined. 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 405 

An examination of civil engineering systems and their design optimization. The 
systems to be studied include water resources engineering, structural engineering, 
transportation engineering and construction. 



282 



CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Graduate or advanced undergraduate standing 

A survey of the problem of atmospheric pollution. Topics to be discussed include: 
pollutant sources; effects on man and other animals, vegetation, materials and 
visibility; meteorological factors; air sampling, control devices; air quality and 
emission standards; and legal, economic and administrative aspects. 

CE 578 (BAE 578) Agricultural Waste Management 3 (2-3) F 

(See biological and agricultural engineering, page 261.) 

CE 580 Flow in Open Channels 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: CE 382 

The theory and application of flow in open channels, including dimensional 
analysis, momentum-energy principle, gradually varied flow, high-velocity flow, 
energy dissipators, spillways, waves, channel transitions and model studies. 

CE 581 (MAS 581) Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CE 382 

A rigorous treatment of the engineering aspects of physical oceanography. The 
theory for the propagation of waves, methods of wave forecasting and the analysis 
of wave spectra are presented. The applications of physical oceanography to the 
design of marine and coastal installations are shown. 

CE 591, 592 Civil Engineering Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

Discussions and reports of subjects in civil engineering and allied fields. 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 1-6 F S 

Special projects in some phase of civil engineering. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CE 601 Transportation Planning 3 (3-0) S 

CE 602 Advanced Transportation Design 3 (2-3) F 

CE 603 Airport Planning and Design 3 (2-3) F 

CE 604 Urban Transportation Planning 3 (3-0) S 

CE 605 Traffic Flow Theory 3 (3-0) F 

CE 624 Analysis and Design of Structural Shells and 

Folded Plates 3 (3-0) S 

CE 625 Advanced Structural Design I 3 (3-0) F S 

CE 626 Advanced Structural Design II 3 (2-3) F S 

CE 627 Analysis and Design of Structures for Dynamic Loads 3 (3-0) S 

CE 631 Field Analysis of Structural Systems 3 (3-0) F 

CE 635 Advanced Theory of Concrete Structures 3 (3-0) S 

CE 641, 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics 3 (3-0) F S 

CE 643 Hydraulics of Ground Water 3 (3-0) F S 



283 



CE 644 Ground Water Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

CE 646 Dynamics of Soils and Foundations 3 (3-0) F 

CE 651 Theory of Limit Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

CE 652 Inelastic Solids and Structures 3 (3-0) S 

CE 661 Numerical Methods in Structural Mechanics 3 (3-0) F 

CE 662 Probabilistic Methods of Structural Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

CE 671 Advanced Water Supply and Waste Water Disposal 4 (3-3) F 

CE 672 Advanced Water and Wastes Treatment 4 (3-3) S 

CE 673 Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal 3 (3-0) F S 

CE 674 Stream Sanitation 3 (3-0) F S 

CE 698 Special Topics in Civil Engineering 1-3 F S 

CE 699 Civil Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming 3 (3-1) F S 

Understanding algorithms, programs, and computers. Organization and charac- 
teristics of computers. Introduction to fundamental algorithms associated with 
computing. Data representation. Basic programming and program structure. 
Debugging and verification of programs. Computer solution of numerical and 
nonnumerical problems using one or more programming languages. 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 (2-1) F S 

Corequisite: MA 102 

Introduction to a problem-oriented computer language for use in problem solution 
using digital computers. This language currently is FORTRAN IV. This course is 
designed as a two-hour service course for scientifically oriented students, pri- 
marily for the School of Engineering. Programs to be written for this course will 
be slanted toward engineering applications. 

CSC 112 Basic Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3 (3-0) F S 
Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CSC 111 

Binary and hexadecimal number systems. Description of machine organization, 
including memory, addressing schemes, l'egisters, and data channels. Internal 
representation of data and instructions. Machine language and the assembly pro- 
cess. Loading and execution. Program relocation. Input and output using facilities 
of a supervisor program. Interrupts and their priorities. Combining separately 
translated programs for execution. 

CSC 200 Introduction to Computers and Their Uses 3 (3-0) F S 

A student who has previously taken CSC 101 or CSC HI may not receive credit for 
this course. 



284 



An introduction to electronic digital computers, including the parts of a com- 
puter, a step-by-step description of the processes which the computer goes through 
in performing its tasks, and description of several uses to which the computer is 
currently being put. Intended for the non-technical student who desires a general 
appreciation of the capabilities of computers and their limitations. 

CSC 211 Programming Languages 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CSC 111 

An in-depth study of language features available in various languages. The 
student is expected to develop good programming habits by writing a variety of 
non-numerical application programs. Emphasis will be on the global properties 
of programs in block-structured languages, and list and string manipulation lan- 
guages. Also data structure definition facilities, compile-time features and run- 
time representation of program and data structures will be compared in the 
languages studied. 

CSC 301 Principles of Systems Programs 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: CSC 112 

Advanced topics in assembly language programming. Program relocatability. 
Definition, call and expansion of macros. Historical survey of development of operat- 
ing systems. Definition of operating system components. Use of operating system 
facilities. 

CSC 302 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CSC 111 
Corequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 

Numerical computations with digital computers; floating point arithmetic and 
implications of round off error. Algorithms and computer techniques for the numeri- 
cal solution of problems in several of the following areas: function evaluation; 
zeroes of functions; interpolation; numerical differentiation and integration; linear 
systems of equations; curve fitting; solutions of nonlinear equations; numerical 
solutions of ordinary differential equations. 

CSC 311 Data Structures 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: CSC 112 and CSC 211 
Corequisite: CSC 322 

An introduction to data structures and the fundamental algorithms associated 
with their use. Topics to be considered are: Linear lists including stacks, queues 
and deques. Sequential and linked allocation of linear lists. Circular lists, doubly- 
linked lists, arrays and orthogonal lists. Trees including traversal of binary trees 
and binary representation of trees. Lists and garbage collection. Multilinked 
structures. Dynamic storage allocation. An introduction to searching and sorting 
techniques. 

CSC 312 Computer Organization and Logic 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: CSC 322 or equivalent 

Application of Boolean algebra to combinational circuit design problems. Sequen- 
tial circuits. Organization and functional design of simplified computer com- 
ponents such as the memory unit, the arithmetic and logic unit and input-output 
devices. Architecture of computing systems. Functional characteristics of I/O 
devices, data channels, interrupt and priority systems. Microprogram control. 
Hardware-software tradeoffs and firmware. 

CSC 321 (E 321) Computer Graphics 3 (2-2) S 

(See engineering, general courses, page 318.) 

CSC 322 Applied Algebraic Structures 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: CSC 211, MA 231 

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Naive set theory, order and equivalence relations, functions, partitions, opera- 
tions and congruences. Boolean algebra, semi-group, group and graph theory. Logic 
of propositions, first order predicate calculus, models for an axiomatic theory. Some 
applications and examples of these algebraic structures selected from formal 
language description, data structures, file organization, information retrieval, 
games, switching circuits, neural nets, sequential machines, artificial intelligence, 
syntactic structure of arithmetic expressions and theory of algorithms. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CSC 411 Introduction to Simulation 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 312 and ST 371 or equivalent 

This course is designed to introduce simulation concepts and methodology to 
computer science students and students from other curricula. Modeling and com- 
putational techniques, Monte Carlo methods, and interactive simulation are dis- 
cussed. Applications from the areas of interest of the students are used to illustrate 
the concepts presented in the lectures. In the laboratory, students will perform 
both analog and digital simulations and will be expected to complete an individual 
term project. 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability, Language and Automata 3 (3-0) S 
Prerequisite: CSC 311 and CSC 322 

Sequential machines as abstractions of digital computers described by state- 
transition graph. Sequential machines as language acceptors and as the finite 
control of a Turing Machine. Chomsky classification of languages and machines. 
Universal Turing machines and the halting problem. Church's thesis. Recursive 
functions. Discussion with heuristic argument that a function is recursive if and 
only if it is Turing computable. Discussion of the semi-group word problem and tree 
searching algorithm. Applications to artificial intelligence, perceptron simulation, 
game playing, syntactic analysis algorithms. 

CSC 421 Computer Systems for Management 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CSC 311 

Introduction to management information systems (MIS) and scope of course. 
The data base approach. Characteristics of successful systems and dimensions of 
system evolution and evaluation. Models versus modeling in MIS design. A model 
of information flow and its economics. Profitability and risk analysis in corporate 
financial systems. Production/inventory control through MIS. Operations research 
techniques for MIS development. Management's MIS consultant. The general pur- 
pose MIS. Human factors in design and implementation of the new company MIS. 

CSC 431 Information Retrieval 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CSC 311 

Organization and retrieval of information in natural language form. Analysis of 
information content by statistical, syntactic and logical methods. Automatic 
clustering and statistical association methods. Dictionary construction and utiliza- 
tion. File organization and retrieval techniques for text processing systems. Evalu- 
ation of retrieval effectiveness. Applications to both document retrieval and question 
answering systems. 

CSC 432 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisites: CSC 302, ST 371 and MA 231 or MA 405 

This course is an introduction to the use of digital computers in the processing 
of analog signals. The uses of operational amplifiers in SAH, DAC, and ADC's and 
other data acquisition devices are discussed. The discrete Fourier transform, 
digital filters and other algorithms used in processing time series are developed 
in the latter part of the course. 



286 



CSC 462 Computing for the Social Sciences 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or equivalent 

A course designed to acquaint the social scientist with the information processing 
capabilities of a computer. Examples and problems drawn from the social sciences 
are used. An introduction to the following topics is included: Fortran, procedures 
for accessing statistical packages and other library routines, and data management 
using disks and tapes. (Computer science majors may not receive credit for CSC 
462.) 

CSC 495 Special Topics in Computer Science 1-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

This course is designed to serve needs not covered by existing courses. It will 
consist of one or more of the following types of study: readings in the literature of 
computer science, introductory research projects, major computer programming 
projects, seminars, or new course development. Work may be done in any area of 
computer science such as software, hardware utilization, programming languages, 
numerical methods or telecommunications. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CSC 501 Design of Systems Programs 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CSC 301, CSC 311, CSC 312 

Review of batch process systems programs, their components, operating charac- 
teristics, user services and their limitations. Implementation techniques for 
parallel processing of input-output and interrupt handling. Overall structure of 
multiprogramming systems on multi-processor hardware configurations. Details 
on addressing techniques, core management, file system design and management, 
system accounting, and other user-related services. Traffic control, interprocess 
communication, design of system modules, and interfaces. System updating, 
documentation and operation. 

CSC 502 Computational Linguistics 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Use of a symbol manipulation language (SNOBOL 4) in solving nonnumeric 
problems. Study of generative grammars, including finite-state, context-free, 
context-sensitive, and transformational grammars. Syntactic analysis by computers: 
algorithms and existing analysis systems for English. Computational semantics. 
Information retrieval and question-answering systems. This course is open to com- 
puter science students and those in other fields. 

CSC 504 Application of Linguistic Techniques to Computer Problems 3 (3-0) S 
Prerequisite: CSC 502 

Semiotics and programming languages. Comparison of semantic theories. Repre- 
sentation, classification and interpretation of scenes and other multi-dimensional 
illustrations. Design of a formal language for describing 2-dimensional geometric 
figures, such as flow charts, chemical structures and logic diagrams. Characteriza- 
tion of programming languages according to the theory of transformational 
grammar. 

CSC 511 Artificial Intelligence 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CSC 311 

Definition of heuristic versus algorithmic methods, rationale of heuristic 
approach, description of cognitive processes. Objectives of work in artificial intel- 
ligence, simulation of cognitive behavior. Heuristic programming techniques. 
Survey of examples from representative application areas. The mind-brain problem 
and the nature of intelligence. Individual projects to illustrate basic concepts. 



28' 



CSC 512 Metaprograms 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CSC 312 or consent of instructor 

This course is intended to provide a detailed understanding of the techniques 
used in the design and implementation of compilers. Introduction to formal gram- 
mars and relations concerning a grammar. Detailed study of algorithms for lexical 
scanners, top-down recognizers, bottom-up recognizers for simple precedence 
grammars, operator precedence grammars, higher order precedence grammars, 
and bounded-context grammars. Runtime storage organization for a compiler 
including symbol tables, internal forms for source programs, semantic routines, 
error recovery and diagnostics, code generation and optimization, and interpreters. 

CSC 522 Formal Languages and Syntactic Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CSC 211, CSC 311, CSC 512 (recommended) 

Detailed study of formal languages and their relation to automata: languages 
and their representation, grammars, finite automata and regular grammars, con- 
text free grammars and pushdown automata, type O grammars and Turing 
machines, the Halting Problem, context-sensitive grammars and linear bounded 
automata, and operations on languages. 

CSC 527 (MA 527) Numerical Analysis I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: CSC 101 or CSC 111; MA 301 or MA 312; MA 231 or MA 405 

Theory of interpolation, numerical integration, iterative solution of non-linear 
equations, numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, matrix inver- 
sion and solution of simultaneous linear equations. 

CSC 528 (MA 528) Numerical Analysis II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: CSC 527 (MA 527) 

Least squai'es data approximation, expansions in terms of orthogonal functions, 
Gaussian quadrature, economization of series, minimax approximations, Pade ap- 
proximations, eigenvalues of matrices. 

CSC 532 Artificial Intelligence II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CSC 511, course in mathematical logic 

A rigourous approach to artificial intelligence emphasizing pattern recognition, 
theorem proving, game playing, learning and heuristic programming. Students will 
be assigned computer projects illustrating theoretical concepts introduced in 
lecture. 

CSC 595 Special Topics 1-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Topics of current interest in computer science not covered in existing courses. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CSC 603 Computational Semantics 3 (3-0) F 



CROP SCIENCE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CS 112 (SSC 112) Perspectives in Agronomy 2 (0-5) S 

Prerequisite: Freshmen or sophomore standing and/or consent of instructor 

An introductory course which presents the different facets of crops, soils, and 
agronomic production. Pertinent features of the materials used in agronomic 
production and the processing of agronomic products will be integrated into the 



288 



discussion to provide a better understanding of the relationship of agronomy to 
related fields. Presentation primarily through use of field trips and tours. 

Mr. Long 

CS 211 Crop Science 4 (4-0) F S 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

A study of fundamental morphological, physiological, and reproductive features 
of crop plants and the management practices which allow such plants to be pro- 
duced economically. Messrs. Emery, Fike 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 (0-2) F S 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: Any crop science course 
Can be taken only once for credit. 

The laboratory course will evaluate methods of identifying and dealing with the 
problems of growing and managing crop plants. Messrs. Emery, Fike 

CS 311 Field Crop Production 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: CS 211, SSC 200, or consent of instructor 

Crop characteristics and varieties, environmental factors, rotations, control of 
pests, and other production practices associated with the major cash crops of 
North Carolina and the United States. Mr. Fike 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: BS 100, SSC 200 recommended 

A study of the production and preservation of the principal forage crops. Special 
attention is given to the development and maintenance of pastures. 

Mr. Chamblee 

CS 315 Turf Management 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

Basic principles of turf production and their practical application to establish- 
ment, maintenance, renovation, and pest control of lawns, playgrounds, sports 
fields, road areas, and similar specialized turf areas. Mr. Gilbert 

CS 402 (BO 402) Economic Botany 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: BO 200 

Emphasis is on plants and human affairs, rather than taxonomy, production, or 
economics. Discussions center on all phases of the interrelationships of the plant 
world and the life history of incipient to modern human cultures. Treatment 
includes plants and plant products, beneficial and harmful, that man has used as 
necessities of life, as ameliorants contributing to his well-being, and as raw materi- 
als for industry. Ornamentals are excluded. Mr. Timothy 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production 2 (2-0) F 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

The course is intended to be a study of the productivity and quality of crops 
in relation to all environmental factors, including man. Disorders caused by 
physical and biotic environmental stresses will be emphasized, and, to the extent 
current knowledge permits, the role of these environmental factors in normal 
crop development will be assessed and clarified. Considerable time will be spent 
discussing the utilization and manipulation of the environment for the continued 
improvement of crops. Mr. Patterson 

CS 413 Plant Breeding 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

An appreciation course in plant breeding. Discussion topics include reproductive 
systems of higher plants; the genetic basis for plant improvement and the selection, 
evaluation, and utilization of crop varieties. Mr. Emery 

289 



CS 414 Weed Science 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: CH 220 or equivalent 

An introduction to weed science covering principles and practices involved in 
cultural and chemical weed control. The chemistry, properties and effects of herbi- 
cides on plants are covered. Identification of common weeds, principles and practices 
of herbicide applications and application equipment, and emphasis on proper use 
of herbicides are given in laboratory. An attempt is made to balance fundamental 
with practical information. Mr. Worsham 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science 1 (1-0) S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

The collection, organization, written preparation, and oral delivery of scientific 
information concerning topics of interest in crop science. Mr. Emery 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisite: CS 311, BO 421 or equivalent? 

A study of special problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research 
problems and findings dealing with this important cash crop will be discussed. 

Mr. Collins 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of Crop Production 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

Discussion will emphasize pertinent physiological processes associated with 
crops and crop management such as plant growth, maturation, respiration and 
photoperiodism. Relationship of the environment to maximum crop yields will be 
discussed. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years). Mr. Fike 

CS 514 (HS 514) Principles and Methods in Weed Science 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisite: CS 414 or equivalent 

Studies on the losses caused by the ecology of weeds, biological control, basic 
concepts of weed management, herbicide-crop relationships and herbicide develop- 
ment. Introduction to greenhouse and bioassay techniques and field research tech- 
niques. Messrs. Monaco, Schrader 

CS 541 (GN 541, HS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: GN 506, ST 511 

An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and 
concepts of inheritance. Messrs. Henderson, Wernsman 

CS 542 (GN 542, HS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 2 (0-4) Sum. 

Prerequisite: CS 541 (GN 541, HS 541) 

Laboratory and field study of the application of the various plant breeding 
techniques and methods used in the improvement of economic plants. (Offered 
summer 1974 and alternate years). Mr. Harvey 

CS 545 (GN 545) Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisite: CS 541 or GN 540 

Discussion topics include: mankind as a potential cultivator; man's anatomy, 
physiology and alimentary needs; origins of cultivation; spread of agriculture in 
terms of various theories; interactions of crops and environments with refer- 
ence to crop evolution; special attributes of cultigens; modern aspects of evolution 
(breeding). (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years). Mr. Lee 



290 



CS 591 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Special problems in various phases of crop science. Problems may be selected or 
will be assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current research. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CS 613 (GN 613, HS 613) Plant Breeding Theory 3 (3-0) S 

(Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) 

CS 614 (HS 614, SSC 614) Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils 3 (3-0) F 
(Offered fall 1973 and alternate years.) 

CS 690 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

CS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

DESIGN 

DN 101. 102 Environmental Design I, II 3 (0-7) F S 

Prerequisites: (101) A major in the School of Design or consent of the dean; (102) 
DN101 

Investigation of the sensory environment as a design determinant. Emphasis is 
centered on individual discovery by the student who must function in problem- 
formulating and problem-solving processes. The course was designed to develop 
technical skills simultaneously with the development of conceptual models. Staff 

DN 111, 112 Perception and Communication I, II 3 (0-7) F S 

Prerequisites: (111) A major in the School of Design or consent of the dean; (112) 
DN111 

Studies designed to increase perceptual awareness and communication skills 
through exercises in various communications media. Staff 

DN 121, 122 History of Design I, II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: (122) DN 121 

A critical study of the related design fields from prehistoric periods to the modern 
era with reference to the social, political and technological movements which 
affected the development. Mr. Reuer 

DN 201, 202 Environmental Design III, IV 4 (1-9) F S 

Prerequisites: (201) DN 102; (202) DN 201 

An introduction to the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture and 
product design through environmental studies and investigation of materials and 
processes. Emphasis is placed on organizing and solving design problems. Staff 

DN 211, 212 Visual Communication I, II 2 (0-6) F S 

Prerequisites: (211) DN 112; (212) DN 211 

Visual communications processes as they support design activities. Two- and 
three-dimensional studies as related to conceptual and definitive aspects of the 
design process. Exercises are aimed at developing a mastery of both technical and 
nontechnical methods of visual communication. Staff 

DN 311, 312 Advanced Visual Laboratory I, II 2-4 F S 

Prerequisites: DN 111, DN 112, DN 211, DN 212 

Extension of problems introduced in first- and second-year drawing on a more 



291 



advanced level. Problems will involve the human figure and its environment and 
investigate techniques to increase the ability of the student to express his ideas in 
varied forms. Staff 

DN 411, 412 Advanced Visual Laboratory III, IV 2-4 F S 

Prerequisites: DN 311, DN 312 

Advanced problems in the fields of painting, sculpture, graphics and photography. 

Staff 

DN 422 History of Design III 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: DN 122 

Specialized historical studies in design fields. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

DN 505 Introduction to Design as Task 3 (0-6) F S Sum. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in design or permission of school dean 

A studio course which approaches design primarily as task. A program of exer- 
cises will be undertaken to acquaint the student with the defining of tasks and their 
interpretation within a designer's power of action. Task as purpose or intention 
takes precedence over technique, which is considered as emergent from a defined 
task. Staff 

DN 506 Introduction to Design as Technique 3 (0-6) F S Sum. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in design or permission of school dean 

A studio course which approaches design primarily as technique. A program of 
exercises will be undertaken to acquaint the student with the techniques available 
to him and their relationship to existing and potential tasks. Technique as 
capability takes precedence over task, which is considered as emergent from a 
designated technique. Staff 

DN 507 Introduction to Design as Practice 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in design or permission of school dean 

A seminar course intended to provide a comprehensive overview of current design 
concepts and activities. Presentations and discussions by School of Design faculty 
and design practitioners will explore the design fields in terms of issues, attitudes, 
methods and operations. Staff 

DN 511, 512 Advanced Visual Laboratory V, VI 2 (0-6) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Advanced experimental studies in visual phenomena related to design. Staff 

DN 541 Seminar on Ideas in Design 2 (2-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

An examination of aesthetics and the relationships of philosophic thought to 
design. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

DN 611, 612 Advanced Visual Laboratory VII, VIII 2 (0-6) F S 



292 



ECONOMICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

EC 205 Economic Activity 3 (3-0) F S 

An introductory study of economic activity with emphasis on national economic 
problems. 

EC 206 The Price System 3 (3-0) F S 

An introductory study of the determination of prices, wages, and value; analy- 
sis of the process and principles by which an economy allocates resources. 

EC 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 111 

An introduction to the economic principles underlying agricultural production 
and marketing; organization for production in agriculture; consumers and their 
influence upon the demand for agricultural products; relationships between agri- 
culture and other segments of the economy; dynamic factors in the economy which 
affect agriculture. 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of Financial Reporting 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of financial reporting concepts, the information generating process, 
income measurement, resource valuation, corporate equity measurement, reporting 
practices, and the interpretation and analysis of financial statements. Includes an 
introduction to internal controls, and merchandising and manufacturing inventories. 

EC 261 Accounting II — Financial Information Systems 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 260 

A study of information systems and their generation of financial data for report- 
ing purposes. Includes consideration of the reporting practices related to non- 
corporate entities, financial statement structures and classifications, and internal 
controls.. 

EC 262 Managerial Uses of Cost Data 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 260 

A study of the managerial uses of cost data in planning, controlling, and evaluat- 
ing organizational activities and in making business decisions. Includes considera- 
tion of budgeting, cost behavior, product costing and pricing, and an introduction 
to production cost. 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 206 or EC 212 and MA 112 or equivalent 

An intensive study of the functioning of the market economy. An examination of 
the role of prices in determining the allocation of resources, the functioning of the 
firm in the economy, and forces governing the production of economic goods. 

EC 302 National Income and Economic Welfare 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 205 and MA 112 or equivalent 

An intensive examination of factors determining the national income. The 
economic and social effects of the level, composition, and distribution of national 
income will be studied with reference to theories of economic welfare and to public 
policy. 

EC 303 Farm Management 3 (2-2) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 212 

An application of basic economic principles and techniques to the problems facing 



293 



a farm business; use of budgeting, programming, systems analysis and other modern 
techniques to determine what, how, and how much to produce when faced with 
numerous alternatives; analysis of problems associated with farm size and the 
acquisition of adequate resources; use and analysis of farm records as an aid to 
better management. Two all-day Saturday field trips are required of all students. 

EC 310 Economics of the Firm 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 205 or EC 206 or EC 212 

An examination of the economic setting within which the business firm makes 
decisions, and an application of economic analysis to these decisions; economics from 
the focal point of managerial decision making. 

EC 311 Agricultural Markets 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EC 212 

A study of the agricultural marketing system and the current economic forces 
affecting its structure and efficiency; decision making by agricultural business 
firms, with some discussion of integration and interfirm relationships; effects of 
monopoly in marketing relative to government policies of control. Classroom dis- 
cussion is supplemented by visits to marketing firms and by practical problems 
illustrating firm decisions. A laboratory period will be included in alternate weeks 
beginning with the second full week of classes. Students are expected to examine 
individually the marketing problems associated with the commodity of their choice. 

EC 317 Introduction to Methods of Economic Analysis 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 301 

This course treats the fundamentals of quantitative methods and economic models 
in the application to economic and industrial problems. Through the study of 
economic variables and their parameters it lays the groundwork for later study 
of firm and consumer behavior. Analysis of the supply and demand sides of the 
market equation is emphasized. There is further examination of the economic 
structure from the standpoint of multiple markets and the general economy. 

EC 360 Financial Reporting Theory and Practice I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 261 

A study of the theory and practice of financial reporting, the preparation of 
working papers and financial statements, the valuation and reporting problems 
relating to cash, receivables, inventories, investments, and tangible and intangible 
assets. Includes consideration of related professional pronouncements. 

EC 361 Financial Reporting Theory and Practice II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EC 360 

A study of the theory and practice of financial reporting, the valuation and 
reporting problems relating to current and non-current liabilities, and corporate and 
non-corporate owners' equities. Includes consideration of cash and fund-flow 
reporting, the analysis of financial statements, the impact of price-level changes 
on financial reporting, and professional literature. 

EC 362 Production Cost Analysis and Control 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 262 

A study of cost analysis and control, and managerial reporting practices for 
producing activities, the development and use of cost standards and budgets, and 
the cost measurement of productive inputs for units of productive outputs. Manager- 
ial use of cost data in analyzing, planning, and controlling business activity is 
emphasized. Includes consideration of information systems and internal controls. 

EC 370 (HI 370) The Rise of Industrialism 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EC 206 and HI 102 



294 



The pattern of historical development of modern industrial economy is studied. 
Origins in 16th century England, the origins of capitalism are related to succeeding 
developments there in the overseas colonial empire and in the remainder of the 
areas influenced by that development. 

EC 401 Economic Analysis for Nonmajors 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 205 

An intensive treatment of intermediate economic theory of firm, household and 
market behavior primarily for graduate students desiring a minor in economics at 
the master's level. Students with an adequate background in economics and math- 
ematics will elect EC 501 rather than EC 401. Topics include demand, production 
and cost theory, market equilibrium under competitive and non-competitive 
conditions, and introduction to input-output and general equilibrium theory, the 
spatial arrangement of economic activity and problems of economic efficiency. 

EC 402 Financial Institutions 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 302 

An examination of the flow-of-funds among the principal financial institutions 
in the American economy; the behavior of the money and capital markets; and the 
allocation of savings flows into investment expenditures. 

EC 407 Business Law I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 205, EC 206 or EC 212 

A course dealing with elementary legal concepts, contracts, agency, negotiable 
instruments, sales of personal property and insurance. Uniform commercial 
code considered under all titles applicable. 

EC 408 Business Law II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 407 

Deals with real property, bailments, partnerships, corporations, chattel mort- 
gages, mortgages on real estate, landlord and tenant, insurance, wills, suretyship, 
conditional sales and bankruptcy. Uniform commercial code considered under all 
titles applicable. 

EC 410 Public Finance and Fiscal Policy 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EC 205, EC 206 (EC 301 recommended) 

An analysis of the economic effects of government taxation and expenditure 
decisions. Major attention will be given to current tax policy issues both at the 
federal level and at the state-local level. A description of different types of budgets 
and the effect of budgetary policy upon the level of economic activity will also be 
included. 

EC 411 Marketing Methods 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 205, EC 206 or EC 212 

Marketing institutions and their functions and agencies; retailing, market analy- 
sis; problems in marketing. 

EC 413 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 301 recommended but not required 

An analysis of the effect of modern industrial structure on competitive behavior 
and performance, in the light of contemporary price theory and the theory of work- 
able competition; a critical evaluation of the legislative content, judicial interpre- 
tation and economic effects of the antitrust laws. 

EC 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: EC 303 

Examination of the source of the productivity and value of farm inputs; a critical 



295 



analysis of and practice in the use of farm appraisal procedures currently used 
for land and buildings; review of the sources of and repayment practices used in 
short and intermediate credit in agriculture; consideration of the forces operating 
in the whole economy with an examination of the implications of these changes for 
both the lender and borrower in agriculture. 

EC 420 Corporation Finance 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 205, EC 260 

Financial instruments and capital structure; procuring funds, managing working 
capital; managing corporate capitalization; financial institutions and their work. 

EC 422 Investments and Portfolio Management 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 205, ST 311 

An analysis of the problems in the investment process, which is dichotomized 
into security analysis and portfolio management with emphasis on the latter. The 
approach is to explain briefly what the traditional thinking has been, and to exam- 
ine closely the modern revolution in investments which emphasizes a quantitative 
framework to achieve the goal of performance. After describing what an individual 
investor faces in making decisions, the question of professional management as an 
alternative is viewed critically. 

EC 425 Industrial Management 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Principles and techniques of modern scientific management; relation of finance, 
marketing, industrial relations, accounting and statistics to production planning 
and control; analysis of economic, political and social influences on production. 

EC 426 Personnel Management 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

The scientific management of manpower, from the viewpoint of the supervisor 
and the personnel specialists; a study of personnel policy and a review of the 
scientific techniques regarding the specific problems of employment, training, 
promotion, transfer, health and safety, employee service and joint relations. 

EC 430 Agriculture Price Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 311 

Principles of price formation; the role of price in the determination of economic 
activity; the interaction of cash and future prices for agricultural commodities; 
methods of price analysis, construction of index numbers, analysis of time series 
data including the estimation of trend and seasonal variations in prices. 

EC 431 Labor Economics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 301 recommended but not required 

An economic approach to the labor market and to labor market problems in- 
cluding unemployment and the determination of wages, hours and working condi- 
tions under various labor market structures; an examination of the economic effects 
of trade unions and an introduction to the theory of human capital. 

EC 432 Industrial Relations 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 205 or EC 212 

Collective bargaining; analysis of basic labor law and its interpretation by the 
courts and governmental agencies; an examination of specific terms of labor con- 
tracts and their implications for labor and management; an examination of labor 
objectives and tactics and management objectives and tactics; problems of operat- 
ing under the labor contract. 



296 



EC 440 Economic Development 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EC 302 

An examination of the institutional background required for national economic 
development. The conditions apparent for past growth of nations are compared 
with conditions obtained in presently retarded nations. Conclusions are drawn from 
this comparison to provide an introduction to the theoretical models of growth. 

EC 441 Agricultural Development in Foreign Countries 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EC 205 or EC 206 or EC 212 

Identification of agricultural problems in underdeveloped countries; a review of 
economic criteria for analyzing the problems of developing agriculture and the 
techniques of analysis for solving such problems. Case studies of development 
programs in various countries will be discussed. 

EC 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EC 301 

An analysis of the development of economic thought and method during the past 
two centuries; economics as a cumulative body of knowledge in a context of 
emerging technology, changing institutions, pressing new problems and the growth 
of science. 

EC 448 International Economics 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EC 205 and EC 206 or EC 212 

A study of international economics, including trade, investment, monetary rela- 
tions and certain aspects of economic development; emphasis upon analytical and 
policy approaches, although some institutional material is included. 

EC 451 Introduction to Econometrics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 301, EC 302 and EC 317 or ST 311 

An introduction to the measurement, specification, estimation and interpretation 
of functional relationships through single equation least-square techniques. Simple 
and multiple regression, curvilinear regression and various transformations will 
be used to measure: demand, cost, production, consumption and investment rela- 
tionships. 

EC 460 Specialized Financial Reporting Theory and Practice 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 361 

A study of the specialized valuation and reporting problems relating to con- 
solidated financial statements, business combinations and reorganizations, 
governmental and nonprofit organizations, home office and branch relationships, 
foreign affiliates, estates and trusts, and business firms experiencing financial 
difficulties. Includes a study of related professional publications. 

EC 464 Income Taxation 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 260 

A study of federal and state income tax laws relating to individuals and other 
taxable or reporting entities, the measurement and reporting of taxable income, 
and basic research in taxation. Includes an introduction to tax planning. 

EC 466 Examination of Financial Statements 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EC 361 

A study of the objectives, standards, procedures, problems, practices and theory 
of financial statement examination as performed by independent public accountants, 
the professional standards and ethical codes, the features of information systems 
and internal control, and other professional topics. Includes extensive use of pro- 
fessional literature and authoritative pronouncements. 



297 



EC 468 Professional Accountancy Resume 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EC 362 and EC 460 

A review and summation of the theory and practice of financial reporting and 
professional accountancy, as they relate to preparation for the certified public 
accountant's examination, covering both their general and specialized topics. 

EC 470 (HI 470) Evolution of the American Economy 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EC 206 and HI 243 or HI 244 or HI 448 or HI 452 

The continuing advances of modern industrialization are related to the develop- 
ment of the American nation. Contemporary problems and issues are analyzed with 
reference to their origins in the historical growth of the economy. 

EC 475 Comparative Economic Systems 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 205 or EC 206 

A general study of different economic systems. Concentration will be given to 
capitalist or market economies and these will be contrasted with collectivist 
types of systems. Emphasis will be given to the Soviet economy. 

EC 482 (TX 482) Sales Management for Textiles 3 (3-0) S 

(See textile technology, page 471.) 

EC 490, 491 Senior Seminars in Economics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 301, EC 302 

The terminal courses in undergraduate study of economics. The student is assisted 
in summarizing his training, and in improving his capacity to recognize problems 
and to select logically consistent means of solving problems. This is done on a 
small-group and individual basis. 

EC 494, 495 (PS 494, 495; SOC 494, 495) Urban Seminar 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

A study of urban and urban-related problems through theories from the 
disciplines of politics, sociology and economics, and their application to an existing 
environment. Intermixed with formal study will be field research in various local 
communities. In addition, students will be involved with both public and private 
agencies and with local leaders in ongoing programs in Raleigh and adjacent 
communities. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EC 501 Price Theory 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 301 and MA 112 or equivalent 

An intensive analysis of the determination of prices and of market behavior, 
including demand, cost and production, pricing under competitive conditions and 
pricing under monopoly and other imperfectly competitive conditions. 

EC 502 Income and Employment Theory 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 302 

A study of the methods and concepts of national income analysis with particular 
reference to the role of fiscal and monetary policy in maintaining full employment 
without inflation. 

EC 510 (PS 510) Public Finance 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 205 

A survey of the theories and practices of governmental taxing, spending and 
borrowing, including intergovernment relationships and administrative practices 
and problems. 



298 



EC 515 Water Resources Economics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

The application of economic principles in the allocation of water resources. Atten- 
tion is given especially to the basic issues of how to effect maximum economic 
efficiency in the use of a resource that is no longer a free good, under the considera- 
tion of the goals of the public and private sectors of the enterprise economy. Both 
economic and political consequences of decision making are studied. 

EC 521 Markets and Trade 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 301 

This course emphasizes the space, form and time dimensions of market price 
and the location and product combination decisions of firms. Consideration is given 
to the ways in which non-price factors and public-policy choices influence firm 
behavior and the efficiency of marketing systems. Application of these models to 
agricultural, industrial and public-service questions is emphasized, including the 
relationships between resource availability and the spatial arrangement of economic 
activity. 

EC 523 Planning Farm and Area Adjustments 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisite: EC 303 

The application of economic principles in the solution of production problems on 
typical farms in the state; methods and techniques of economic analysis of the farm 
business; application of research findings to production decisions; development of 
area agricultural programs. 

EC 525 Management Policy and Decision Making 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 301 

A review and consideration of modern management processes used in making 
top-level policies and decisions; an evaluation of economic, social and institutional 
pressures, and of the economic and noneconomic motivations, which impinge upon 
the individual and the organization. The problem of coordinating the objectives and 
the mechanics of management is examined. 

EC 533 Agricultural Policy 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EC 301 

A review of the agricultural policy and action programs of the federal government 
as regards both input supply and commodities, analysis of objectives, principal 
means and observable results as regards resource use and income distribution 
within agriculture, and between agriculture and the rest of the economy; appraisal 
of the effects alternative policy proposals would have on domestic and foreign 
consumption. 

EC 535 Social Science Concepts in Managerial Processes 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Six hours in economics 

Interrelationships between concepts from economics and from other social 
sciences in managerial processes of clarifying goals, discovering alternatives and 
choosing courses of action. Cases are used to provide opportunities to compare 
contributions of theoretical concepts from economics, political science, social 
psychology, sociology and management science to managerial processes. Theo- 
retical concepts are drawn from readings in the various disciplines. 

EC 550 Mathematical Models in Economics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EC 301, EC 302, MA 212 and MA 405 recommended but not required 

An introductory study of economic models emphasizing their formal properties. 
The theory of individual economic units is presented as a special case in the theory 
of inductive behavior. Mathematical discussions of the theory of the consumer, the 
theory of the firm and welfare economics will show the relevance of such topics as 



299 



constrained maxima and minima, set theory, partially and simply ordered systems, 
probability theory and game theory to economics. 

EC 551 Agricultural Production Economics 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 301 

An economic analysis of agricultural production including: production functions, 
cost functions, programming and decision-making principles; and the applications 
of these principles to farm and regional resources allocation, and to the distribution 
of income to and within agriculture. 

EC 555 Linear Programming 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EC 301, MA 212, MA 405 

Recent developments in the theory of production, allocation and organization; 
optimal combination of integrated productive processes within the firm; applications 
in the economics of industry and of agriculture. 

EC 561 (ST 561) Intermediate Econometrics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EC 501 and ST 501 or MA 1 12 

The formalization of economic hypotheses into testable relationships and the 
application of appropriate statistical techniques will be emphasized. Major atten- 
tion will be given to procedures applicable for single equation stochastic models 
expressing microeconomic and macroeconomic relationships. Statistical considera- 
tions that are relevant in working with time series and cross-sectional data in 
economic investigations will be covered. The use of simultaneous equation models 
and the available estimation techniques will be surveyed. 

EC 570 Analysis of American Economic History 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EC 470 (HI 470) or graduate standing 

Stresses the application of economic analysis to the formulation and testing of 
hypotheses concerning economic growth and development in the historical context. 
Problems selected for analysis will be drawn primarily from American economic 
history. 

EC 574 (SOC 574) The Economics of Population 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EC 301 

A review of pre-Malthusian thought up to contemporary population theories. The 
student is introduced to data sources, statistical tools and methodology for economic 
analysis in demography. There follows an intensive treatment of microeconomic 
models of fertility. On the macroeconomic side, economic demographic models are 
examined. Implications of these economic models for public policy are developed. 
Underpopulation, overpopulation, optimum growth rate and incentive schemes are 
discussed. 

EC 585 (TX 585) Market Research in Textiles 3 (3-0) S 

(See textile technology, page 472.) 

EC 590 Special Economics Topics Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

An examination of current problems in economics organized on a lecture-discus- 
sion basis. The content of the course will vary as changing conditions require 
the use of new approaches to deal with emerging problems. 

EC 598 Topical Problems in Economics 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

An investigation of topics of particular interest to advanced students under the 
direction of faculty members on a tutorial basis. Credits and content will vary with 
the needs of the students. 



300 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EC 600 Advanced Price Theory 

EC 601 Prices, Value and Welfare 

EC 602 Advanced Income and Employment Theory 

EC 603 History of Economic Thought 

EC 604 Monetary Economics 

EC 606 Industrial Organization and Control 

EC 610 Theory of Public Finance 

EC 625 Long Range Planning in Business and Industry 

EC 630 Labor Economics and Manpower Problems 

EC 631 Human Capital 

EC 632 Economic Welfare and Public Policy 

EC 640 Analysis of Economic Development 

EC 641 Agricultural Production and Supply 

EC 642 Consumption, Demand and Market Interdependency 

EC 645 Planning Programs for Economic Development 

EC 648 Theory of International Trade 

EC 649 Monetary Aspects of International Trade 

EC 650 Economic Decision Theory 

EC 651 (ST 651) Econometrics 

EC 652 (ST 652) Topics in Econometrics 

EC 665 Economic Behavior of the Organization 

EC 699 Research in Economics 



3 (3-0) F S 

3 (3-0) F S 

3 (3-0) F S 

3 (3-0) F S 

3 (3-0) F 

3 (3-0) F 

3 (3-0) F S 

3 (3-0) S 

3 (3-0) S 

3 (3-0) F 

3 (3-0) S 

3 (3-0) S 

3 (3-0) S 

3 (3-0) F 

3 (3-0) F S 

3 (3-0) S 

3 (3-0) S 

3 (3-0) F S 

3 (3-0) F 

3 (3-0) S 

3 (3-0) F S 

Credits Arranged 



EDUCATION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 100 Introduction to Industrial Education 
(See industrial and technical education, page 359.) 

ED 101 Orientation 

(See mathematics and science education, page 386.) 



2 (2-0) F 
(1-0) F 



301 



ED 102 Objectives in Agricultural Education 1 (1-0) F S 

(See agricultural education, page 248.) 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 (2-3) F S 

(See mathematics and science education, page 386.) 

ED 304 (PHI 304) Philosophy of Education 3 (3-0) F S 

(See philosophy, page 414.) 

ED 305 Analysis of Technical Education Programs and 

Course Construction 3 (3-0) S 

(See industrial and technical education, page 359.) 

ED 313 Contemporary Vocational Agriculture 3 (3-0) F S 

(See agricultural education, page 248.) 

ED 318 (SOC 318) Educational Sociology 3 (3-0) F S 

(See sociology, page 451.) 

ED 327 History and Philosophy of Industrial and 

Technical Education 3 (3-0) F 

(See industrial and technical education, page 359.) 

ED 344 Secondary Education 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

An overview of secondary education, including development, problems, services, 
trends, teaching profession, role of school in the community; purposes and object- 
ives; the development and status of secondary education in North Carolina. 

Mr. Ivie, Miss Week 

ED 405 Industrial and Technical Education Shop and 

Laboratory Planning 3 (3-0) F 

(See industrial and technical education, page 359.) 

ED 410 Driver Education 3 (2-2) S Sum. 

The principles of teaching basic driving skills, including the new concept of 

defensive driving, observance and interpretation of motor vehicle laws, adverse 

driving conditions, handling of accident situations and care of the car. Staff 

ED 411 Student Teaching in Agriculture 8 (2-15) F 

(See agriculture education, page 248.) 

ED 412 Teaching Adults 2 (1-2) F S 

(See agricultural education, page 248.) 

ED 413 Planning Educational Programs 2 (1-2) F S 

(See agricultural education, page 248.) 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance 2 (2-0) F S 

(See guidance and personnel services, page 347.) 

ED 421 Principles and Practices in Industrial 

Cooperative Training 3 (3-0) F S 

(See industrial and technical education, page 359.) 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects 3,4 (3-2) F 

(See industrial and technical education, page 359.) 



302 



ED 423 Methods and Materials in Teaching Modern Languages 3 (3-0) F S 
Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, senior standing and admission to teacher education 
with a major in modern languages and an overall 2.0 average 

A study of the methods of teaching modern languages including the use of appro- 
priate instructional materials and audio-visual equipment. Mr. Reynolds 

ED 424 Student Teaching in Modern Languages 6 (2-15) F 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, senior standing and admission to teacher educa- 
tion with a major in French or Spanish and an overall 2.0 average 

This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity 
to acquire experience in the techniques and skills involved in teaching French or 
Spanish. Each student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks in a selected 
off-campus center. In addition to acquiring the competencies essential for teaching 
French or Spanish, the student teacher will also have an opportunity to become 
familiar with the total school program and to participate in as many school and 
community activities as time will permit during the period of student teaching. 

Mr. Reynolds 

ED 428 Organization of Related Study Materials 3 (3-0) F S 

(See industrial and technical education, page 360.) 

ED 440 Vocational Education 2 (2-0) F 

(See industrial and technical education, page 360.) 

ED 444 Student Teaching in Industrial Subjects 8 (2-15) F 

(See industrial and technical education, page 360.) 

ED 450 Methods and Materials in Teaching English 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, senior standing and admission to teacher educa- 
tion with a major in English and an overall 2.0 average 

A study of the purposes, curricula, materials and methods of teaching the skills 
of reading, writing, speaking and listening in secondary schools. 

Messrs. Betts, Walters 

ED 451 Teaching Secondary School Reading 2 (2-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher certification program 

A study of the nature of the reading process and of principles, methods and 
materials for the development of effective reading attitudes and skills as applied 
both to developmental and remedial programs. Staff 

ED 454 Student Teaching in English 6 (2-15) F S 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, senior standing and admission to teacher educa- 
tion with a major in English and an overall 2.0 average 

This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity to 
acquire experience in the techniques and skills involved in teaching English. Each 
student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks in a selected off-campus center. 
In addition to acquiring the competencies essential for teaching English, the 
student teacher will also have an opportunity to become familiar with the total 
school program and to participate in as many school and community activities as 
time will permit during the period of student teaching. Messrs. Betts, Walters 

ED 460 Methods and Materials in Teaching Social Studies 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, senior standing and admission to teacher educa- 
tion with a major in social studies and an overall 2.0 average 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices 
appropriate for teachers of social studies at the secondary level. Mr. Harper 



303 



ED 464 Student Teaching in Social Studies 8 (2-15) F S 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, senior standing and admission to teacher educa- 
tion and an overall 2.0 average 

This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity 
to acquire experience in the techniques and skills involved in teaching social 
studies. Each student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks in a selected 
off-campus center. In addition to acquiring the competencies essential for teaching 
social studies, the student teacher will also have an opportunity to become familiar 
with the total school program and to participate in as many school and community 
activities as time will permit during the period of student teaching. Mr. Harper 

ED 470 Methods of Teaching Mathematics 3 (3-0) F S 

(See mathematics and science education, page 386.) 

ED 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics 8 (2-15) F S 

(See mathematics and science education, page 387.) 

ED 472 Developing and Selecting Teaching Materials in 

Mathematics 2 (2-0) F S 

(See mathematics and science education, page 387.) 

ED 475 Methods of Teaching Science 3 (3-0) F 

(See mathematics and science education, page 387.) 

ED 476 Student Teaching in Science 8 (2-15) F 

(See mathematics and science education, page 387.) 

ED 477 Developing and Selecting Teaching Materials in Science 2 (2-0) F 
(See mathematics and science education, page 387.) 

ED 480 Methods and Materials in Teaching Speech 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, senior standing and admission to teacher educa- 
tion with a major in speech and 2.0 overall average 

A study of the purposes, curricula, materials and methods of teaching speech, 
including public speaking, discussion, debate, speech improvement, oral reading 
and play production. Mr. Munn 

ED 481 Student Teaching in Speech 6 (2-15) F S 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, senior standing and admission to teacher education with a 
major in speech and 2.0 overall average 
Corequisite: ED 480 

This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity to 
acquire experience in the techniques and skills involved in teaching speech. Each 
student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks in a selected off-campus center. 

Mr. Munn 

ED 482 Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts 2 (1-2) S 

(See industrial and technical education, page 360.) 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional Media 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate standing 

This course provides an introduction to the characteristics and utilization of media 
for instruction; study and implementation of the relationship between media and 
instructional objectives; and elementary projects in designing, developing, and 
using instructional media materials. Mr. Gibson 

ED 490 Senior Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 (1-0) F S 

(See agricultural education, page 248.) 

304 



ED 495 Senior Seminar in Mathematics and Science Education 3 (3-0) F S 
(See mathematics and science education, page 387.) 

ED 496 Senior Seminar in Education 1-3 F S Sum. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

An in-depth investigation and discussion of a topic or set of problems in the 

field of professional education. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 The Community College System 3 (3-0) F 

(See adult and community college education, page 246.) 

ED 501 (SOC 501) Leadership 3 (3-0) F S 

(See sociology, page 453.) 

ED 502 (PS 502) Public Administration 3 (3-0) F S 

(See politics, page 432.) 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and 

Community College Education 3 (3-0) F S 

(See adult and community college education, page 246.) 

ED 504 Principles and Practices of Introduction to Vocations 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours in education 

This course is designed for teachers in the public schools of North Carolina who 
teach Introduction to Vocations. The course emphasizes the place of the Introduction 
to Vocations Program in the overall school curriculum, special methods of instruc- 
tion, use of teaching aids and use of student evaluation instruments. An overview 
is also presented in the areas of community organization, job markets, group pro- 
cedures, occupational and educational information, and the changing occupational 
structure in our society. Staff 

ED 505 Public Area Schools 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Junior and community colleges, technical institutes, vocational schools and 
branches of universities: their development, status and prospects; policy and policy 
making, clientele, purposes, evaluation programs, personnel, organization adminis- 
tration, financing, facilities, research and development functions. Staff 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: Six hours education or psychology 

Discussion of principles and techniques of teaching the exceptional child with 
major interest on the mentally handicapped and slow learner. Practice will be given 
in curriculum instruction for groups of children, and individual techniques for 
dealing with retarded children in the average classroom. Opportunity for individual 
work with an exceptional child will be provided. Mrs. McCutchen 

ED 507 Analysis of Reading Abilities 3 (3-0) F 
Prerequisites: Six hours education or psychology 

A study of tests and techniques in determining specific abilities; a study of 

reading retardation and factors underlying reading difficulties. Mr. Rust 

ED 508 Improvement of Reading Abilities 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: Six hours education or psychology 

A study of methods used in developing specific reading skills or in overcoming 
certain reading difficulties; a study of methods used in developing pupil vocabularies 

305 



and word analysis skills; a study of how to control vocabulary burden of reading 
material. Mr. Rust 

ED 509 Methods and Materials — Teaching Retarded Children 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ED 506 

Emphasis on understanding and correlating developmental levels of mentally 
retarded children and appropriate educational methods and materials. Use of indi- 
vidual child's diagnostic data; consideration of long and short range educational 
goals; curriculum planning in terms of realistic usefulness; scheduling; teacher 
guidance of children toward social and emotional maturity. Mrs. McCutchen 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, 

Contemporary Nature 3 (3-0) F 

(See adult and community college education, page 246.) 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure, and 
Processes for the Teaching of Mathematics in the 
Elementary School 3 (3-0) F S 

(See mathematics and science education, page 387.) 

ED 512 Active Learning Approaches to Teaching Mathematics 

in the Elementary School 3 (3-0) F S 

(See mathematics and science education, page 388.) 

ED 513 (SOC 513) Community Organization 3 (3-0) F S 

(See sociology, page 454.) 

ED 516 Community Occupational Surveys 2 (2-0) S 

(See industrial and technical education, page 360.) 

ED 517 Implications for Data Processing in Education 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

Prerequisites: CSC 111; ED 529 or consent of instructor 

An intensive study of current attempts to apply new technologies to education. 
Attention will be given to research findings related to Computer Assisted Instruc- 
tion, gamed instructional simulation, approaches to guidance and prescription 
learning as well as administrative problems pertaining to student scheduling, pupil 
transportation and data reporting systems. Graduate Staff 

ED 518 Principles of School Law 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: Six hours graduate credit 

This course will be an intensive study of the legal right, duties, privileges and 
responsibilities entailed in the educational enterprise. It will cover the essentials of 
school law in such a way that the student will be able to obtain both a general 
understanding of the processes of law as they affect American education and also 
important specific legal aspects which affect vocational education. Included are 
the secondary, post-secondary and adult vocational education laws and their 
implications. Mr. Nerden 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education 3 (1-4) S Sum. 

Prerequisite: PSY 475 or PSY 576 

This course is concerned with the plannings, selection and utilization of human 
resources, activities, materials and facilities relating to the education of young 
children. Emphasis on student observation, participation and evaluation of educa- 
tional experiences appropriate for the developmental level of individual children, 
including flexible grouping, curricula planning and instructional techniques for an 
optimum learning environment. A synthesis of the student's knowledge of human 
development, learning theory and research findings as related to classroom appli- 
cation. Mrs. McCutchen 



306 



ED 520 Personnel and Guidance Services 3 (3-0) F S 

(See guidance and personnel services, page 347.) 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services Credits Arranged F S 
(See guidance and personnel services, page 347.) 

ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired 3 (3-0) Sum. 

The sensory processes and sensory cues on which independent mobility depends 
for the visually impaired person will be discussed. Various techniques and modes of 
travel will be considered. Particular emphasis will be given to instruction and 
background which will enable persons not teaching orientation mobility as a skill 
to reinforce the learning that takes place in other situations. Graduate Staff 

ED 524 Occupational Information 3 (3-0) S 

(See guidance and personnel services, page 347.) 

ED 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction 3 (3-0) F 

(See industrial and technical education, page 360.) 

ED 526 Teaching in College 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

Designed primarily for graduate students in the departments outside the School 
of Education, this course focuses on the development of competencies to perform the 
day-to-day tasks of a college teacher as well as consideration of more long-range 
tasks such as course development and the university responsibilities of a professor. 
In addition to attending lectures and other types of presentations, students will 
make video tapes of their teaching, develop tests, design an introductory course in 
teaching field, and engage in other similar types of activities. Staff 

ED 527 Philosophy of Industrial and Technical Education 3 (3-0) F S 

(See industrial and technical education, page 361.) 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

This course is designed to guide and assist in the growth patterns of individuals 
who are preparing to be directors, administrators or supervisors of vocational 
education programs at the local, state and/or national levels, with special empha- 
sis upon the organization and operation of cooperative occupational programs. The 
course will cover the entire field of cooperative occupational education on secondary, 
post-secondary and adult levels. It will refer to the accepted essentials of coopera- 
tive education in order that the application of the philosophy to the details of 
planning, organization, establishment, and operation of cooperative occupational 
programs will be practical and meaningful. Included will be student visitations to 
existing quality programs in cooperative occupational education, for the purpose 
of studying on-site conditions related to this specialized area of study. 

Mr. Smith 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development 3 (3-0) S 

(See industrial and technical education, page 361.) 

ED 530 Group Guidance 3 (3-0) F 

(See guidance and personnel services, page 347.) 

ED 531 (PSY 531) Mental Deficiency 3 (3-0) S Sum. 

Prerequisites: Nine hours psychology and special education 

This will be a course in description, causation, psychological factors and socio- 
logical aspects of mental retardation. Educational methods for the mentally re- 
tarded will be examined. The course is designed primarily for school psychologists 
and special-class teachers of retarded children, both educable and trainable. 

Mr. Corter 

307 



ED 533 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 3 (3-0) S 

(See guidance and personnel services, page 347.) 

ED 534 Guidance in the Elementary Schools 3 (3-0) S 

(See guidance and personnel services, page 348.) 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education 3 (3-0) F S 

(See guidance and personnel services, page 348.) 

ED 536 Structure and Function of the Eye and 

Use of Low Vision 3 (5-0) Sum. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

This is a special institute in which participants will spend a minimum of 45 hours 
in class and class-related activities. Medical and educational consultants will 
discuss the structure and function of the eye, eye anomalies likely to affect children 
with low vision, methods of evaluating type and potential use of residual vision, 
and methods of teaching children to use minimal vision effectively; for teachers 
and administrators either presently employed in educational programs for low 
vision persons or planning to participate in such programs next year. 

Mrs. Rawls 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in 

Higher Education 3 (3-0) S 

(See adult and community college education, page 247.) 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and 

Community College Education 3 (3-0) S 

(See adult and community college education, page 247.) 

ED 540 Individual and Group Appraisal I 3 (3-0) F 

(See guidance and personnel services, page 348.) 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in the Teaching of 

Social Studies 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or graduate, must have completed student 
teaching 

An analysis of the principles, strategies and applications of new teaching ap- 
proaches. Team-teaching, programmed instruction, inductive and reflective 
oriented teaching, role-playing, simulation and gaming, independent study and 
block-time organization will be explored. Graduate Staff 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent of instructor 

This course is designed as an introductory course in educational administration. 
Emphasizing basic principles of administration, the course will draw upon adminis- 
trative theory, business, and public administration models as well as theoretical 
constructs from various disciplines. 

ED 552 Industrial Arts in the Elementary School 3 (3-0) Sum. 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours education, consent of instructor 

This course is organized to help elementary teachers and principals understand 
how tools, materials and industrial processes may be used to vitalize and supple- 
ment the elementary school child's experiences. Practical children's projects along 
with the building of classroom equipment. Staff 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education 3 (3-0) F S 

(See agricultural education, page 248.) 



308 



ED 555 Comparative Crafts and Industries 
(See industrial and technical education, page 361.) 

ED 559 Learning Concepts and Theories Applied to 
Adult and Community College Education 
(See adult and community college education, page 247.) 



6 Sum. 



3 (3-0) S 



ED 560 (I A 560) New Developments in Industrial Arts Education 3 (3-0) F S 
(See industrial arts, page 364.) 

ED 563 Effective Teaching 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours education including student teaching 

Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course 
approaches; identifying problems of importance; problem solution for effective 
learning; evaluation of teaching and learning; making specific plans for effective 

Staff 

3 (3-0) F S 



teaching. 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations 
(See agricultural education, page 248.) 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture 
(See agricultural education, page 249.) 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture 
(See agricultural education, page 249.) 

ED 590 Individual Problems in Guidance 
(See guidance and personnel services, page 348.) 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education 
(See industrial and technical education, page 361.) 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching 
(See mathematics and science education, page 388.) 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education 
(See agricultural education, page 249.) 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching 
(See mathematics and science education, page 388.) 

ED 595 (I A 595) Industrial Arts Workshop 
(See industrial arts, page 364.) 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community 
College Education 
(See adult and community college education, page 247.) 



3 (3-0) F S 

3 (3-0) F S 

Maximum 6 F S 

Maximum 6 

3 (3-0) S 

Credits Arranged 

3 (0-3) F S 

3 (3-0) Sum. 

Credits Arranged 
3 (0-0) F S Sum. 



ED 597 Special Problems in Education 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor 

This course is designed to provide graduate students in education the opportunity 
to study problem areas in professional education under the direction of a member 
of the graduate faculty. Graduate Staff 



ED 598 Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, 

Motivating and Teaching Disadvantaged Adults 
(See adult and community college education, page 247.) 



3 (3-0) S 



309 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to 
Adult and Community College Education 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied 
to Adult and Community College Education 

ED 602 Curriculum 



3 (3-0) F 

3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F S 



ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Sciences in Higher Education 3 (3-0) F 

3 (3-0) F S 



ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in 
Science and Mathematics 



ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers 

of Mathematics and Science 3 (3-0) S 

ED 608 Supervision of Vocational and Industrial 

Arts Education 3 (3-0) F 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Technical Education Programs 3 (3-0) F 

ED 610 Administration of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

Education 3 (3-0) S 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Vocational 

Education 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting and Management of Vocational 

Education Programs 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 614 Modern Principles and Practices in 

Secondary Education 2 (2-0) F S 

ED 615 Introduction to Educational Research 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 617 Philosophy of Agricultural Education 3 (3-0) S 

ED 620 Cases in Educational Administration 3 (3-0) S Sum. 

ED 621 Internship in Education 3-9 F S Sum. 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts 2 (2-0) F S 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory 3 (3-0) F 

ED 633 Techniques of Counseling 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts 2 (2-0) F S 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work Maximum 3 

ED 640 Individual and Group Appraisal II 3 (3-0) F 

ED 641 Laboratory and Practicum Experiences in Counseling 2-6 F S 

ED 660 (I A 660) Industrial Arts Curriculum 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 



310 



ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 665 Supervising Student Teaching 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling 3 (1-8) F S 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

ED 689 Evaluation in Occupational Education 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education Maximum 2 F S 

ED 691 Seminar in Industrial Education 1 (1-0) F S 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education 1 (1-0) F S 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education Credits Arranged 

ED 694 Seminar in Agricultural Education Maximum 2 1 (1-0) F S 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education Maximum 2 F S 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education 1-3 F S 

ED 697 (PSY 697) Advanced Seminar in Research Design 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 698 Seminar in Occupational Education 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 699 Research Credits Arranged 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 201 Electric Circuits I 4 (2-5) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 102 

Fundamental laws of electric circuits. Introduction to transient and steady- 
state sinusoidal analysis. Problem drill and laboratory exercises. 

EE 202 Electric Circuits II 4 (2-5) S 

Prerequisites: EE 201, MA 201 

A continuation of EE 201. Circuit analysis by complex frequency. Introduction to 
two-part networks and polyphase circuits. Problem drill and laboratory exercises. 

EE 211 Electric Circuits I, Theory 3(3-0) 

Prerequisite: MA 102 

Theory part of EE 201. Offered only by correspondence. Enrollment subject to 
approval of electrical engineering department undergraduate administrator. 

EE 213 Electric Circuits I, Laboratory 1 (0-2) Sum. 

Prerequisite: EE 211 

Laboratory part of EE 201. Enrollment subject to approval of electrical engineer- 
ing department undergraduate administrator and limited to students who have 
passed EE 211. 



311 



EE 303 Electromagnetic Fields I 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: EE 201, PY 208 
Corequisite: MA 301 

Basic principles of electromagnetic field theory in vector analysis formulation 
emphasizing static and quasi-static electric and magnetic fields. Maxwell's equa- 
tions. 

EE 304 Electromagnetic Fields II 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: EE 303, MA 301 

Continuation of EE 303. Vector and scalar retarded potentials. Generation and 
propagation of energy by electromagnetic waves. Relationship between field theory 
and circuit theory. Applications of electromagnetic theory to devices and to distri- 
buted parameter systems. 

EE 305 Electromechanical Systems 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisites: EE 202, MA 202, EE 303 

A classroom and laboratory study of the principles, performance and character- 
istics of direct-current and alternating-current machinery. 

EE 314 Electronic Circuits 4 (2-5) F 

Prerequisites: EE 202, MA 202 

A study of active devices with emphasis on bipolar and field effect transistors as 
elements of electric circuits. Elementary physical electronics, linear and nonlinear 
equivalent circuits, small signal amplifiers. 

EE 331 Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: MA 201, PY 208 

Not available to undergraduates in electrical engineering. 

An introduction to the basic concepts, units and methods of analysis of electrical 
engineering. Current-voltage characteristics of linear and nonlinear electrical 
devices, analysis of d-c and a-c circuits, simple amplifiers and energy conversion 
devices. Demonstrations of equipment and procedures. 

EE 332 Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EE 331 

Not available to undergraduates in electrical engineering. 

Power distribution systems, motors, feedback, amplifiers, oscilloscopes, volt- 
meters, digital information, measurements by digital means, presented from the 
user's viewpoint. Demonstrations of equipment and procedures. 

EE 333 Principles of Electrical Engineering Laboratory 1 (0-3) S 

Corequisite: EE 332 

Not open to electrical engineering students. 

Laboratory work in the material covered in EE 332. 

EE 334 Electronics and Instrumentation 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EE 202 or EE 331 

Not available to undergraduates in electrical engineering. 

A survey of electrical and electronic circuits to provide nonelectrical engineering 
majors with a working understanding of electronic circuits and instruments which 
might be encountered in the practice of their own disciplines. Demonstrations of 
equipment and procedures. 

EE 335 Electronics and Instrumentation Laboratory 1 (0-3) S 

Corequisite: EE 334 

Not open to electrical engineering students. 

Laboratory work in the material covered in EE 334. 

312 



EE 336 Industrial Power and Control Systems 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EE 202 or EE 331 

Study of applications of power generation and transformation in industry, Trans- 
formers, DC generators and motors, single-phase and polyphase motors, manual and 
automatic starting and control of motors with special emphasis on use of solid-state 
devices. 

EE 337 Industrial Power Laboratory 1 (0-3) S 

Corequisite: EE 336 

Not open to electrical engineering students. 

Laboratory work in the material covered in EE 336. 

EE 339 Principles of Electrical Engineering Laboratory 1 (0-3) F S 

Corequisite: EE 331 

Not open to electrical engineering students. 

Laboratory work in the material covered in EE 331. 

EE 350 Electrical Power Utilization in Manufacturing Processes 3 (2-3) F S 

Prerequisites: PY 212, MA 201 

Not available to undergraduates in electrical engineering. 

Introduction to basic electrical theory; d-c and a-c circuits and measurements; 
study of d-c motors and of single-phase and polyphase utilization equipment; basic 
control systems and brief introduction to principles of automatic control. Applica- 
tion examples will be drawn from the technologies of particular interest to the 
students in the class. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 401 Advanced Electric Circuits 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EE 202, MA 301 

Transient analysis of electric circuits by the Laplace transform method, and the 
relationship of this method of analysis to steady-state performance, with empha- 
sis on feedback systems. 

EE 403 Electric Network Design 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EE 401 

The study of design methods for such electric networks as resonant systems, fil- 
ters, feedback stabilizers, audio amplifier compensation and dividing networks. 

EE 406 Dynamical Systems Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EE 202 or 331, EM 305, MA 301 

A study of dynamic systems in various branches of engineering and science with 
emphasis on the similarities that exist among such integrated groups of devices. 
Analogous elements and quantities in these fields as determined from equations 
basic to each. Analytical formulation of system problems in accoustical, electrical, 
mechanical and related fields and their solution by analog methods. Use of com- 
puters for the solution of system problems. 

EE 431 Electronics Engineering 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: EE 314 

Comprehensive study of circuits using discrete and integrated electron devices: 
amplifiers, oscillators, wave-shaping circuits, nonsinusoidal generators, feedback. 
Emphasis is on design of solid-state circuits, through development of analytical 
methods using graphical, slide-rule and computer techniques. 



313 



EE 432 Communication Engineering 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: EE 431 

Application of electronic circuits to communication systems employing amplitude, 
angle and pulse modulation. Elements of complete systems: modulators, demodula- 
tors, transmitters and receivers. Introduction to information theory and noise. 

EE 433 Electric Power Engineering 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: EE 305 or EE 332 

Electrical power supply for industrial and commercial applications; control of 
electrical motor drives; system safety and protection; practice in testing electrical 
machines. 

EE 434 Power System Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EE 305 

Analysis of problems encountered in the long-distance transmission of electric 
power. Line parameters by the method of geometric mean distances. Circle dia- 
grams, symmetrical components and fault calculations. Elementary concepts of 
power system stability. Applications of digital computers to power-system problems. 

EE 435 Elements of Control 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: EE 314, EE 305 

Introductory theory of open- and closed-loop control. Functions and performance 
requirements of typical control systems and system components. Dynamic analysis 
of eiTor detectors, amplifiers, motors, demodulators, analogue components and 
switching devices. Component transfer characteristics and block diagram repre- 
sentation. 

EE 438 Electronic Instrumentation 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: MA 301 or EE 314 or EE 334 

A survey of electrical-electronic measurement techniques and operating prin- 
ciples of electronic instruments. Includes a study of signal sources and their equi- 
valent circuits, basic electronics including junction and field effect transistors, 
operational amplifiers, switching logic and data display. Applications including 
low-level phenomena and noise problems will be included, with many lecture demon- 
strations. 

EE 440 Fundamentals of Digital Systems 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EE 314 

The basic theory of digital computation and control. Introduction to number 
systems, data handling, relay algebra, switching logic, memory circuits, the appli- 
cation of electronic devices to switching circuits, and the design of computer 
control circuits. 

EE 441 Introduction to Electron Devices 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MA 301 ; PY 207; or PY 208 

A study of the basic physical principles necessary for understanding modern 
electronic devices. Quantum and statistical mechanic concepts are introduced at 
an elementary level, and these ideas form the basis for a discussion of a wide variety 
of devices which are used in modern engineering and instrumentation. 

EE 442 Introduction to Solid-State Devices 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EE 441 or PY 407; MA 301 

An introduction to the microscopic phenomena responsible for the operation of 
solid-state electronic devices. A qualitative description of the band model of solids 
is followed by a description of the transport properties of charge carriers. P-n 
junction diodes and transistors, solar cells, controlled rectifiers, tunnel diodes and 
unijunction transistors are treated along with more recently developed devices. 



314 



EE 445 Introduction to Antennas 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: EE 304, EE 314 

An introduction to antenna engineering. Consideration will be given to radiation 
from single-element radiators, radiation patterns, directive properties aperture 
concepts, gain and impedances. Multielement antennas and arrays with various 
amplitude distributions and phasings, and thin linear antennas will be treated in 
some detail. Antennas of current usage. 

EE 448 Introduction to microwaves 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: EE 304, EE 314 

A study of the elementary theory and special techniques required at microwave 
frequencies. Both passive and active circuits will be considered. Transmission 
elements, special-purpose components, generators, to include klystrons, magne- 
trons, traveling wave tubes, and solid-state devices will be discussed. The descrip- 
tion of microwave networks by the scattering matrix will be presented. 

EE 492 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering 3 (3-0 to 0-9) F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

A course offered as needed to cover new or special subject matter. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 503 Computer-Aided Circuit Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EE 314, EE 401, B average in electrical engineering and mathematics 
Analysis of electrical circuits with emphasis on computer methods. Steady-state 
and transient analysis of linear and nonlinear networks; tolerance analysis; pro- 
gramming considerations. Mr. Staudhammer 

EE 504 Introduction to Network Synthesis 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EE 401, B average in electrical engineering and mathematics 

A study of the properties of network functions and the development of the methods 
of network synthesis of one-port and two-port passive structures. Mr. Hoadley 

EE 511 Electronic Circuits 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EE 314 or EE 430, B average in electrical engineering and math- 
ematics 

Electronic devices in amplifiers, feedback systems, oscillators, modulators, 
switching and wave-shaping circuits. Generation of nonlinear waveforms; electronic 
instruments; circuits basic to electronic computers. Use of complex frequency con- 
cepts to obtain generalized response. Communications, power and industrial appli- 
cations. Synthesis of circuits to satisfy system requirements. Mr. Barclay 

EE 512 Communication Theory 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EE 314, B average in electrical engineering and mathematics 

Material basic to information-bearing signals in linear systems. Signals in the 
frequency and time domains, probability and associated functions, random signal 
theory, modulation and frequency translation, noise, sampling theory and correla- 
tion functions. Principles of information theory including information measure, 
signal space and channel capacity. Fundamentals of encoding. Accent on methods 
and problems unique to the field of digital communication. (Offered fall every year 
and spring 1974.) Messrs. Barclay, Goetze, O'Neal, Stroh 

EE 516 Feedback Control Systems 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EE 435, or EE 401 and B average in electrical engineering and 
mathematics 

Study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities such as 
voltage, speed and mechanical position. Theory of regulating systems and servo- 

315 



mechanisms. Steady-state and transient responses. Evaluation of stability. Transfer 
function loci and root locus plots. Analysis using differential equation and opera- 
tional methods. Systems compensation and introduction to design. Mr. Peterson 

EE 517 Control Laboratory 1 (0-3) S 

Corequisite: EE 516 

Laboratory study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities 
such as voltage, speed and mechanical position. Characteristics of regulating 
systems and servomechanisms. The laboratory work is intended to contribute to 
an understanding of the theory developed in EE 516. Mr. Peterson 

EE 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EE 314 or EE 430, B average in electrical engineering and mathe- 
matics 

A study of elementary machine language theory, computer organization and 
logical design, logical algebras and function minimization (map method emphasized). 
Introductory combinational and sequential logic including circuits, basic building 
blocks, and theory construction using electronic and core elements. (Offered fall 
every year, summer 1974 and spring 1976.) Messrs. Bell, Gault, Staudhammer 

EE 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EE 520 

A study of the internal organization and structure of digital systems including 
gates, toggle circuits, pulse circuitry and advanced machine language theory. Ana- 
lysis and synthesis of the major components of computers, including the logic section, 
storage devices, registers, input-output and control. 

Messrs. Bell, Staudhammer 

EE 530 Physical Electronics 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EE 304, B average in electrical engineering and mathematics 

A study of behavior of charged particles under the influence of fields and other 
charged particles. Ballistics, quantum mechanics, particle statistics, electron 
emission and properties of dielectric and magnetic materials. (Offered fall every 
year, spring 1975 and summer 1973.) Mr. Matthews 

EE 533 Integrated Circuits 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EE 314, B average in electrical engineering and mathematics. 

A study of the implementation of solid-state circuits in integrated form. In- 
cludes characteristics of expitaxial, diffused, thin and thick film approaches. Digital 
and linear applications are examined. Mr. Manning 

EE 535 (MAE 535) Gas Lasers 3 (3-0) F S 

(See mechanical and aerospace engineering, page 394.) 

EE 540 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EE 304, B average in electrical engineering and mathematics 

Laws and concepts of static electromagnetism. Fundamental equations and their 
applications. Fundamentals, forms and applications of Maxwell's equations. Vector 
and scalar potentials, relativistic aspects of fields, energy and power. Waves in 
unbound and bounded regions, radiation, wave-guides and resonators. (Offered fall 
every year, summer 1975 and spring 1973.) Mr. Tischer 

EE 545 Introduction to Radio Wave Propagation 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EE 304, B average in electrical engineering and mathematics 

Characteristics of plane electromagnetic waves in homogeneous and nonhomo- 
geneous media with application to tropospheric and ionospheric propagation. 
Relationships between electron density, collision frequency and complex refrac- 

316 



tive index, theory of the formation and dynamics of ionospheric layers and theorems 
for the prediction of ionospheric propagation. Mr. Flood 

EE 591, 592 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: B average in technical subjects 

A two-semester sequence to develop new courses and to allow qualified students 
to explore areas of special interest. Graduate Staff 

EE 593 Individual Topics in Electrical Engineering 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: B average in technical subjects 

A course providing an opportunity for individual students to explore topics of 
special interest under the direction of a member of the faculty. 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EE 610 Non-Linear Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

EE 611 Electric Network Synthesis 3 (3-0) F S 

EE 613, 614 Advanced Feedback Control 3 (3-0) F S 

EE 616 Microwave Electronics 3 (3-0) S 

EE 617 Pulse and Digital Circuits 3 (3-0) S 

EE 618 Antennas and Radiation 3 (3-0) F 

EE 619 Guided Waves and Resonators 3 (3-0) S 

EE 622 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Materials I 3 (3-0) S 

EE 623 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Materials II 3 (3-0) F 

EE 624 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Devices 3 (3-0) S 

EE 625 Advanced Solid-State Device Theory 3 (3-0) F 

EE 640 Advanced Logic Circuits 3 (3-0) S 

EE 641 Sequential Machines 3 (3-0) F 

EE 642 Automata and Adaptive Systems 3 (3-0) S 

EE 651 Statistical Communication Theory 3 (3-0) S 

EE 652 Information Theory 3 (3-0) F 

EE 653 Fundamentals of Space Communications 3 (3-0) S 

EE 654 Communication Systems Analysis 3 (3-0) S 

EE 655 Wave Phenomena in Plasma 3 (3-0) S 

EE 659 Pattern Recognition 3 (3-0) F 

EE 691, 692 Special Studies in Electrical Engineering 3 (3-0) F S 



317 



EE 695 Electrical Engineering Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

EE 699 Electrical Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

ENGINEERING 

General Courses 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 (1-2) F S 

The theory of graphically representing and solving spatial problems. Emphasis 
is placed on the development of a logical and analytic approach to problem solution. 
Conventional methods of graphically describing size and shape are presented and 
the representation of basic mechanical elements is introduced. Practical engi- 
neering applications are utilized. Staff 

E 120 Engineering Concepts 3 (2-1) F S 

An introduction to engineering concepts by student involvement in realistic 

freshman design projects. The history, fields and functions of engineering, case 

studies, computational skills, and societal problems are covered. Staff 

E 201 Spatial Relations and Vector Applictions 3 (2-2) F S 

Prerequisites: First courses in graphics and physics 

A study of the spatial representation of points, lines, and planes and the 
determination of the lengths, sizes, and angles that exist between these elements, 
with the application of these studies to vector systems. Staff 

E 207 Engineering Graphics III 2 (1-3) 

Prerequisite: E 101 

A more exact presentation of engineering data in the graphical medium. Produc- 
tion dimensioning, detail and assembly production drawings, and free-hand sketch- 
ing are covered. Special emphasis is placed on the use of sketching in the com- 
munication of engineering data. Mr. Webb 

E 240 Furniture Graphics 3 (1-4) F 

Prerequisite: E 101 

Provides the student with an understanding of furniture drawings and their 
dimensioning. Special conventions applying to the furniture industry are covered. 
Free-hand sketching is emphasized. Mr. Freeman 

E 301 Graphical Solutions for Numerical Data 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: A first course in calculus 

A study of the available graphic methods to represent and manipulate numerical 
data. Topics include the proper selection of coordinate systems and axes, empirical 
equations, curve fitting, graphical calculus, nomography, and the design of special 
purpose slide rules. Computer applications are demonstrated. Mr. Hammond 

E 321 (CSC 321) Computer Graphics 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisites: MA 202 or MA 212, and CSC 101 or CSC 111 

The presentation of a wide range of computer-graphic methods of data manipu- 
lation in such a way that the student knows what computer-graphic methods are 
available and when and how they can be applied. Three-dimensional applications 
are covered. Mr. Houck 

E 432 Patents Trademarks and Copyrights 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

A course designed to acquaint students with the everyday patent, trademark and 
copyright problems that arise in engineering, scientific and industrial pursuits. It 

318 



includes the rights and remedies available to individual inventors and authors as 
well as companies. Consideration is also given to Patent Office procedures and 
practices. Mr. Mills 

E 492 Special Topics in Engineering 1-3 F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

A course offered as needed to cover special subject matter of a non-department- 
al nature. Staff 

ENGINEERING HONORS 

EH 346 Fluid Mechanics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EM 200; membership in the engineering honors program or consent 
of instructor 

Study of the concepts and principles relating to fluid mechanics. Equilibrium 
of liquids and gases, kinematics and dynamics of frictionless fluids. Motion of 
viscous fluids. Dynamics of gases. Flow measurement techniques. 

EH 371 Thermodynamics I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Membership in the engineering honors program or consent of 
instructor 

A study of the basic principles and concepts of thermodynamics. Particular em- 
phasis is placed on first and second laws, their implications and applications. The 
properties of actual and real gases are investigated and also the interrelation- 
ships between the properties as given by the general equations of thermodynamics. 

EH 372 Thermodynamics II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EH 371; membership in the engineering honors program or consent 
of instructor 

The statistical approach to thermodynamics and the application to determination 
of specific heats. Entropy and probability. The thermodynamics of fluid flow in- 
cluding supersonic flow. The basic laws of heat transfer. Ideal gas and vapor 
cycles. Introduction to chemical thermodynamics. 

EH 395 Contemporary Trends in Engineering and Science 1 (1-0) F 

Prerequisite: Membership in engineering honors program or consent of instructor 

Representatives from various fields of engineering or science discuss topics of 
current significance in their areas of interest. 

EH 401 Special Topics in Engineering 1-4 V S 

Prerequisite: Membership in the engineering honors program or consent of in- 
structor 

Individual projects in various phases of engineering, either of a research or 
design nature. 

EH 495 Engineering Honors Seminar 1 (1-0) S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in the engineering honors program or consent of 
instructor 

Individual presentation by the students of their projects conducted in connection 
with the honors program. 

EH 500 Engineering Analysis 1-4 F S 

Students working in small groups (or sometimes individually) with faculty ad- 
visors undertake the solution of realistic problems. These normally require the 
integration of knowledge from one or more engineering fields, physical sciences, 
mathematics, and occasionally life sciences; the aim is synthesis rather than mere 
analysis. 

319 



ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

EM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 (3-0) F S 

Corequisite: MA 301 

An introduction to the principles and concepts which form the basis for studies 
in dynamics, solid mechanics and fluid mechanics. The nature and properties of 
force systems and stress fields. The motion of particles and description of deforma- 
tion of continuous media. The role of Newton's laws, the concepts of continuity and 
equilibrium, and the conservational principles in problems in mechanics. Staff 

EM 205 Principles of Engineering Mechanics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: PY 205 
Corequisite: MA 202 

Basic concepts, forces and equilibrium, distributed forces, virtual work, and in- 
ertial properties; application to mechanics, structures and systems. Staff 

EM 206 Introductory Applications in Mechanics 1 (0-2) F 

Corequisite: EM 205 

Principles of mechanics applied to practical problems of engineering science in 
which numerical techniques of computation are emphasized. Staff 

EM 211 Introduction to Applied Mechanics 3 (3-0) F S 

Corequisites: MA 212, PY 212 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the concepts of particle and 
rigid body mechanics. The fundamentals of equilibrium, kinematics and kinetics 
are applied to engineering problems involving structures and machines. Staff 

EM 212 Mechanics of Engineering Materials 3 (2-1) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 211 

This course constitutes a study of the properties of engineering materials with 
special emphasis on the mechanical parameters. It is especially conceived to pre- 
pare the student for the selection and specification of materials common to engi- 
neering practice. A particular emphasis is given to mechanical aspects of materials 
employed in design. Staff 

EM 301 Solid Mechanics I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

Introduction to the mechanics of deformable solids. Development of the equations 
which describe the linear elastic solid. Approximate solutions and solutions 
governed by the theory of elasticity to problems involving prescribed force systems, 
states of motion or energy inputs. Staff 

EM 302 Solid Mechanics II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

Continuation of EM 301. Equations for thin plates. Introduction to the theory of 
plasticity. Theories of yielding, plastic stress-strain relationships and two-dimen- 
sional problems in plastic behavior. Staff 

EM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 200 or EM 205 

Development of the basic equations of fluid mechanics in general and specialized 
form. Application of these specialized equations to a variety of topics including (1) 
fluid statics, (2) inviscid, incompressible fluid flow and (3) viscous, incompressible 
fluid flow. Staff 



320 



EM 304 Fluid Mechanics II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 303 

Continuation of EM 303. Further applications of the basic equations of fluid 
mechanics to (1) boundary layers and analysis, (2) laminar and turbulent flows and 
(3) compressible fluid flow. Introduction to experimental methods in fluid mech- 
anics. Staff 

EM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 205 
Corequisite: MA 301 

Equations of motion; kinematics, kinetics of mass points and systems of mass 
points; kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies; dynamics of nonrigid systems. 

Staff 

EM 307 Mechanics of Solids 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: EM 205 
Corequisite: MA 301 

Stresses, strains, constitutive laws, yield and fracture; application to axial, 
bending, torsional and plane stress states; deflection and stability analyses. Staff 

EM 311 Experimental Engineering Science I 3 (1-6) F 

Corequisites: EM 303, EM 307 

A course which deals from the outset with the experimental analysis concept 
starting with question of how observations and measurements are made. Illustra- 
tions follow of experimental methods which enable the inference of one physical 
variable by the observation of another but related one. Mr. Bingham 

EM 312 Experimental Engineering Science II 3 (1-6) S 

Prerequisite: EM 311 

The background in EM 311 is utilized in the study of broader problems which 
require the synthesis from several experimental methods as well as mathematical 
and/or numerical methods of an analytical system. Mr. Bingham 

EM 315 (ARC 315) Architectural Mechanics I 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite': One semester of calculus; recommended: PY 221 or equivalent 

An introduction to the mechanics of architectural structures: a lecture- workshop 
course in which the determinants of architectural form are related to structural 
function through a study of mechanics; principles of statics including particle and 
rigid body mechanics, force systems, equilibrium, and internal force systems. 
Lectures will present concepts and methods; workshops will provide an opportunity 
for application and exploration of lecture material. Messrs. Clayton, Brantly 

EM 316 (ARC 316) Architectural Mechanics II 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: EM 315 (ARC 315) 

A continuation of EM 315 (ARC 315): a lecture-workshop course which in- 
vestigates the mechanical properties of construction materials and the purpose, 
geometrical characteristics, behavior, and design of structural elements. Lectures 
will present concepts and methods; workshops will provide an opportunity for 
application and exploration of lecture material. Messrs. Clayton, Brantly 

EM 411, 412 Engineering Cybernetics I, II 3 (1-4) F S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineering mechanics or equivalent background 

A year course to provide a forum for formal lectures on a range of common topics 
which would include, among others, the subjects of dynamics of linear and non- 
linear systems; hereditary and feedback couplings; continuous, discrete, random 
and stochastic inputs; system stability; reliability; optimization; and the ultra- 
stable autonomous system. A principal feature is student participation, in either 

321 



individual or collective form, in extra-class work of personal character in the 
design of particular engineering systems. Mr. McDonald 

EM 415 Engineering Science in Contemporary Design 2 (1-3) S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineering mechanics 

A course in which, drawing upon the student's background in engineering 
sciences, current problems are analyzed. Case histories and evaluations of selected 
designs are discussed. Mr. Douglas 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EM 501, 502 Continuum Mechanics I, II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EM 301, EM 303, MAE 301, MA 405 

The concepts of stress and strain are presented in generalized tensor form. Em- 
phasis is placed on the discussion and relative comparison of the analytical models 
for elastic, plastic, fluid, viscoelastic, granular and porous media. The underlying 
thermodynamic principles are presented, the associated boundary value problems 
are formulated and selected examples are used to illustrate the theory. 

Mr. T. S. Chang 

EM 503 Theory of Elasticity I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EM 301 
Corequisite: MA 511 or MA 401 

The fundamental equations governing the behavior of an elastic solid are 
developed in various curvilinear coordinate systems. Plane problems, as well as 
the St. Venant problem of bending, torsion and extension of bars are covered. Dis- 
placement fields, stress fields, Airy and complex stress functions are among the 
methods used to obtain solutions. Messrs. Douglas, Smith 

EM 504 Mechanics of Ideal Fluids 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EM 304 
Corequisite: MA 513 

Basic equations of ideal fluid flow; potential and stream functions; vortex 
dynamics; body forces due to flow fields, methods of singularities in two-dimensional 
flows; analytical determination of potential functions; conformal transformations; 
free-streamline flows. Messrs. C. M. Chang, Edwards, Sorrell 

EM 505 Mechanics of Viscous Fluids I 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EM 304 
Corequisite: MA 532 

Equations of motion of a viscous fluid (Navier-Stokes equations); general 
properties of the Navier-Stokes equations; some exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes 
equations; boundary layer equations; some approximate methods of solution of the 
boundary layer equations; laminar boundary layers in axisymmetric and three- 
dimensional flows; unsteady laminar boundary layers. 

Messrs. C. M. Chang, Edwards, Sorrell 

EM 506 Mechanics of Compressible Fluids I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EM 304, MAE 302 
Corequisite: MA 532 

Introduction to the flow of a compressible fluid: thermodynamics and one- 
dimensional energy equation for a compressible gas. Acoustics, normal shock 
waves and expansion waves, shock tube theory, general one-dimensional flow and 
flow in ducts and channels. Messrs. C. M. Chang, Sorrell 



322 



EM 507 Systems Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EM 305, MA 405 

An introduction to the principles and concepts underlying systems analysis. Major 
topics treated are: finite-dimensional vector spaces, matrices and linear operators, 
state space and state equations, linear differential systems, and equilibrium and 
stability. Illustrations and applications are chosen from the broad areas of 
engineering mechanics and dynamical systems theory. The state variable approach 
is emphasized. Messrs. Gogolewski, McDonald 

EM 508 Systems Synthesis 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EM 507 

A course in the design of engineering systems in which mechanics dominates. 

Messrs. Gogolewski, McDonald 

EM 509 Space Mechanics I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EM 302, EM 304 
Corequisite: MA 511 

The applications of mechanics to the analysis and design of orbits and trajec- 
tories. Trajectory computation and optimization; space maneuvers; reentry tra- 
jectories; interplanetary guidance. Messrs. Clayton, Maday 

EM 510 Space Mechanics II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EM 509, MA 511 

Continuation of EM 509. The analysis and design of guidance systems. Basic 
sensing devices; the characteristics of an inertial space; the theory of stabilized 
platforms; terrestrial inertial guidance. Messrs. Clayton, Maday 

EM 511 Theory of Plates and Shells 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 511 

Bending theory of thin plates; geometry of surfaces and stresses in shells. Various 
methods of analysis are discussed and illustrated by problems of practical interest. 

Messrs. Bingham, Clayton, Gurley 

EM 521, 522 Properties of Solids I, II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: EM 307, MAT 301, PY 413 

Micro and macro principles are applied toward an introductory understanding of 
material properties. The concepts of kinetic distribution and ensemble average of 
atomic behaviors are employed to characterize and interrelate material properties. 
Phenomenological behaviors and coupled effects are described within the con- 
tinuum concept. • Mr. Horie 

EM 551 Advanced Strength of Materials 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

Stresses and strains at a point; rosette analysis; stress theories, stress concen- 
tration and fatigue; plasticity; inelastic, composite and curved beams; prestress 
energy methods; shear deflections; buckling problems and column design; and 
membrane stresses in shells. Mr. Gurley 

EM 552 Elastic Stability 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EM 551, MA 301, MA 405 

A study of elastic and plastic stability. The stability criterion as a determinant. 
The energy method and the theorem of stationary potential energy. The solution of 
buckling problems by finite differences and the calculus of variations. The appli- 
cation of successive approximations to stability problems. Optimization applied to 
problems of aeroelastic and civil engineering structures. Mr. Gurley 



323 



EM 555 Dynamics I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 405 

The theory of vibrations from the Lagrangian formulation of the equations of 
motion. Free and forced vibrations with and without damping, multiple degrees of 
freedom, coupled motion, normal mode vibrations, wave propagations in solid 
bodies. Messrs. Clayton, Maday 

EM 556 Dynamics II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 405 

The dynamics of particles and rigid bodies by the use of formulations of the laws 
of mechanics due to Newton, Euler, Lagrange and Hamilton. Accelerated reference 
frames, constraints, Euler's angles, the spinning top, the gyroscope, precission, 
stability, phase space and nonlinear oscillatory motion. 

Messrs. Clayton, Maday 

EM 590 (PHI 590, REL 590) Technology and Human Values 3 (0-3) F S 

Prerequisites: A baccalaureate degree in a recognized field of engineering, liberal 
arts, science or social science; or for advanced undergraduates in these fields, 
two or more courses such as HI 341, UNI 301, UNI 302, UNI 401, or six hours 
in philosophy 

An exploration from two or more disciplinary perspectives (notably those of 
ethical theory and cybernetic information theory) the range of ways of conceptual- 
izing the relationship between the technologies of a society and the values of that 
society, and in areas of particular interests to students, a detailed analysis of con- 
temporary instances of the interrelation of technology and human values. 

Mr. McDonald 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EM 601, 602 Unifying Concepts in Mechanics I, II 3 (3-0) F S 

EM 603 Theory of Elasticity II 3 (3-0) S 

EM 604 Theory of Plasticity 3 (3-0) S 

EM 605, 606 (MAS 605, 606, OY 605, 606) Advanced 

Geophysical Fluid Mechanics I, II 3 (3-0) F S 

EM 611 Mechanics of Compressible Fluids II 3 (3-0) S 

EM 612 Mechanics of Viscous Fluids II 3 (3-0) F 

EM 613, 614 (MAS 613, 614, OY 613, 614) Perturbation 

Method in Fluid Mechanics I, II 3 (3-0) F S 

EM 631 (OR 631) Variational Methods in Optimization 

Techniques I 3 (3-0) F 

EM 632 (OR 632) Variational Methods in Optimization 

Techniques ii 3 (3-0) S 

EM 641 Optical Mechanics 3 (2-3) F 

EM 656 Nonlinear Vibrations 3 (3-0) S 

EM 695 Experimental Methods in Mechanics 3 (2-3) S 

EM 697 Seminars in Mechanics 1(1-0)FS 

324 



EM 698 Special Topics in Mechanics Credits Arranged F S 

EM 699 Research in Mechanics Credits Arranged F S 

ENGINEERING OPERATIONS 

EO 491 Seminar in Engineering Operations 1 (1-0) F 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

This seminar assists seniors in engineering operations in making the transition 
from a college environment to that of industry through lectures, guest speakers 
and class discussions. It should be scheduled for the last fall semester in residence. 

ENGLISH 

(Also see Speech) 

FRESHMAN ENGLISH 
Required of all Freshmen 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 (3-0) F S 

Intensive study and practice in the basic forms and principles of expository 

communication; conferences. Staff 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: ENG 111 

Continued practice in expository writing; introduction to literary types; collateral 
reading; conferences. Staff 

NOTE: Qualified students will be allowed to register for ENG 112 H and will be 
given credit for ENG 111 upon successful completion of the course. Eligibility for 
ENG 112H is based on the student's predicted grade in English, employing a formula 
determined by Counseling, plus a composition to be written at the first or second 
class meeting of the ENG 112H section. 

NOTE: The prerequisite for all advanced courses in writing, language, speech, 
or literature is the completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112 with a grade of C or 
better in at least one semester. Desirable preparation for literature courses of the 
300 level or above is ENG 205 or any semester of ENG 261, ENG 262, or ENG 265, 
ENG 266. 

WRITING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ENG 200 Writing Laboratory (0-3) F S 

A three-hour noncredit remedial course in composition designed for upper- 
classmen, chiefly juniors and seniors, who in any curriculum may be found 
deficient in composition. Mr. Easley 

ENG 215 Principles of News and Article Writing 3 (3-0) F S 

An introduction to the techniques of conducting interviews and writing news 

stories (including feature articles) for a variety of news media. Mrs. Bradley 

ENG 321 The Communication of Technical Information 3 (3-0) F S 

Intensive training in the fundamentals of business and industrial expository and 

persuasive writing. Mrs. Bradley, Messrs. Dandridge, Davis 

325 



ENG 322 Advanced Expository Writing 3 (3-0) F 

A course for upperclassmen designed to examine the rhetoric of the sentence, the 
paragraph and the whole discourse in order to develop awareness of the relationship 
between structure and effect in expository writing. A section designated ENG 
322H is restricted to teacher certification English majors. 

Messrs. Dandridge, Meyers 

ENG 323 Creative Writing 3 (3-0) F 

Especially designed for students who have demonstrated ability; emphasis on 

short prose fiction. Messrs. Barrax, Owen, Walters 



LITERATURE 



FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 (3-0) F S 

Selected masterworks drawn from American, English, and European literature. 

Staff 



ENG 261 English Literature I (Beginnings to 1790) 



3 (3-0) F S 
Staff 



ENG 262 English Literature II (1790 to present) 



3 (3-0) F S 
Staff 



ENG 265 American Literature I (Beginnings to 1850) 



3 (3-0) F S 
Staff 



ENG 266 American Literature II (1850 to present) 



3 (3-0) F S 
Staff 



ENG 290 Classical Backgrounds of English Literature 3 (3-0) F 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the classical background, the 
central story-matter of the ancient world — Greek, Roman, and Hebrew — which has 
exerted such a profound influence on the civilization, and especially on the liter- 
ature, of the Western world. Mr. Lasseter 

ENG 315 Reporting and Editing 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ENG 215 

A journalism course in techniques of analyzing sources and readership; planning, 
organizing, and writing various kinds of articles; and editorial processes such as 
copyediting, headline writing, and page layout. Mrs. Bradley 



ENG 325 (REL 325) Religion and the Modern Literary 
Imagination 
(See religion, page 449.) 



3 (3-0) F 



ENG 346 Comparative Literature I 3 (3-0) F S 

Selected great books ranging from the earliest Hebraic and Greek literature to 

the beginnings of the Renaissance. Mrs. Smoot, Mr. Smith 

ENG 347 Comparative Literature II 3 (3-0) S 

Masterworks of Continental literature from the Renaissance to 1900. 

Mrs. Smoot 



326 



ENG 369 American Novel of the 19th Century 3 (3-0) S 

Analysis of selected romantic, realistic, and naturalistic novels. 

Messrs. Clark, West 

ENG 370 The British Novel of the 18th and 19th Centuries 3 (3-0) F 

A study of the background of the English novel from its beginnings to the end of 
the 19th century, and an analysis of the novel as a form. 

Miss C. Moore, Messrs, Durant, F. Moore 

ENG 371 The Modern Novel 3 (3-0) S 

A study of the background and patterns, and an analysis of major examples of 

the 20th-century novel. Miss C. Moore, Messrs. Halperen, Reynolds 

ENG 372 Modern Poetry 3 (3-0) S 

An introductory course with the objective of defining the "modern temper" by 

comparison of contemporary poetry with that of the past. Reading and analysis of 

individual poems. Messrs. Lasseter, Owen 

ENG 382 Short Prose Fiction 3 (3-0) S 

Contemporary British and American short stories. Mr. Kincheloe 

ENG 391 Introduction to American Folklore 3 (3-0) F 

A systematic study of the principal types of folklore, combined with field work in 

collecting and assimilating materials from the various cultural traditions, with 

major emphasis on American folklore and its origins. Mr. Betts 

ENG 395 Black American Literature 3 (3-0) F S 

A survey of Black American literature from significant beginnings to the present. 

Mr. Barrax 

ENG 397 Literature of the Non-Western World 3 (3-0) F 

Selected translations from the literature of Persia, India, China, and Japan. 

Messrs. Lasseter, Owen 

ENG 398 Contemporary Literature I (1900 to 1940) 3 (3-0) F 

A study of a broad range of imaginative literature from the period 1900-1940 
with emphasis upon themes and techniques rather than genre or nationality. 

Messrs. Heffernan, Knowles, Reynolds 

ENG 399 Contemporary Literature II (1941 to Present) 3 (3-0) S 

The study of representative French, American, and British writers of the period 

1940 to the present. Messrs. Knowles, Reynolds 

ENG 439 17th-century English Literature 3 (3-0) S 

An examination of the major nondramatic literary figures in England during the 

period 1600-1700. Messrs. Blank, Heffernan, White 

ENG 449 The Renaissance 3 (3-0) F 

A study of nondramatic prose and poetry of the 16th century, with consideration 

of literary types and movements, and with special emphasis on the works of 

major authors. Messrs. Blank, T. Hester 

ENG 451 Chaucer 3 (3-0) F S 

An undergraduate introduction to the study of Chaucer through an intensive 
reading of his masterpieces, The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. 

Messrs. Koonce, Toole 

327 



ENG 453 The Romantic Period 3 (3-0) F 

The poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, with readings in 

the prose of Lamb, DeQuincey, and others. Messrs. P. Williams, Hargrave 

ENG 462 18th-century English Literature 3 (3-0) F 

The major figures in English literature between 1660 and 1790 in the light of 

social, cultural, and religious change. Messrs. Durant, White 

ENG 463 The Victorian Period 3 (3-0) S 

Major poets and selected prose writers studied against the social, economic, 
scientific, and theological background of the century. 

Messrs. Hargrave, Lasseter 

ENG 468 American Romanticism 3 (3-0) F 

A study of major American writers from 1825 to 1865. 

Messrs. Kincheloe, Stein, West 

ENG 469 American Realism and Naturalism 3 (3-0) S 

A study of major American writers from 1865 to 1935. 

Messrs. Kincheloe, Stein, West 

ENG 480 Modern Drama 3 (3-0) F 

Major plays from Ibsen to Albee. Mr. Halperen 

ENG 485 Shakespeare 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of the principal plays with emphasis on the development of the play- 
wright. Messrs. Blank, Champion, Hartley, Toole, P. Williams 

ENG 496 Literary Analysis (Senior Seminar) 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the department 

A flexible course in reading and criticism designed to synthesize some aspect of 
the student's preceding work in literature and to provide a capstone for his under- 
graduate program. A section designated ENG 496H, restricted to teacher certifica- 
tion English majors, will be offered each semester. Staff 

ENG 498 Special Topics in English 1-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Six hours of English above the freshman level 

A detailed investigation of a special topic in language or literature, the topic and 
mode of study to be determined by the faculty member in consultation with the head 
of the English department. Staff 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

ENG 504 Problems in College Composition 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor 

Directed study of the development of rhetorical skills in composition in classroom 
situations. Enrollment restricted to graduate assistants. Messrs. Betts, Walters 

ENG 524 Modern English Usage 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor 

An intensive study of English grammar, with attention to new developments in 
structural linguistics and with emphasis on current usage. Mr. Meyers 

ENG 526 History of the English Language 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor 



328 



A survey of the growth and development of the language from its Indo-European 
beginnings to the present. Mr. Meyers 

ENG 561 Milton 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ENG 261 or equivalent 

An intensive reading of Milton with attention to background materials in the 
history and culture of 17th-century England. Messrs. F. Moore, White 

ENG 575 Southern Writers 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ENG 266 or equivalent 

A survey of the particular contribution of the South to American literature, with 
intensive study of selected major figures. Messrs. Kincheloe, West 

ENG 578 English Drama to 1642 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: ENG 261 or equivalent 

Intensive study of the English drama from the beginnings to 1642. 

Messrs. Champion, Toole 

ENG 579 English Drama of the Restoration and 18th Century 3 (3-0) S 
Prerequisite: ENG 261 or equivalent 

Intensive study of the English drama from 1660 to 1800. Mr. Durant 

ENG 590 Literary Criticism 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ENG 261 or equivalent 

An examination of the critical process as it leads to the definition and analysis of 
literature, together with attention to the main literary traditions and conventions. 

Messrs. Halperen, P. Williams 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENG 608 Bibliography and Methodology 3 (3-0) F 

ENG 610 Middle English Literature 3 (3-0) F 

(Offered in alternate years.) 

ENG 615 American Literature of the Colonial Period 3 (3-0) F 

(Offered in alternate years.) 

ENG 620 16th-century Non-Dramatic English Literature 3 (3-0) F 

ENG 630 17th-century English Literature 3 (3-0) S 

ENG 650 19th-century English Literature: 

The Romantic Period 3 (3-0) F 

ENG 651 Studies in Chaucer 3 (3-0) F 

ENG 655 19th-century American Literature: 

The Romantic Period 3 (3-0) F 

ENG 658 Studies in Shakespeare: The Tragedies 3 (3-0) F 

ENG 659 Studies in Shakespeare: The Comedies 3 (3-0) S 

ENG 660 Victorian Prose 3 (3-0) S 



329 



ENG 662 18th-century English Literature 3 (3-0) F 

ENG 665 19th-century American Literature: The Period 

of Realism and Naturalism 3 (3-0) S 

ENG 670 20th-century British Literature (Prose) 3 (3-0) S 

(Offered in alternate years.) 

ENG 671 20th-century British Literature (Poetry) 3 (3-0) S 

(Offered in alternate years.) 

ENG 675 20th-century American Literature (Prose) 3 (3-0) F 

(Offered in alternate years.) 

ENG 676 20th-century American Literature (Poetry) 3 (3-0) F 

(Offered in alternate years.) 

ENG 680 20th-century Drama (British) 3 (3-0) S 

(Offered in alternate years.) 

ENG 681 20th-century Drama (American) 3 (3-0) S 

(Offered in alternate years.) 

ENG 692 Special Topics in American Literature 3 (3-0) F S 

ENG 693 Special Topics in English Literature 3 (3-0) F S 

ENG 699 Research in Literature (Thesis) Credits Arranged F S 

ENTOMOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 301 Introduction to Forest Insects 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: FOR 264 

An introductory course covering the fundamentals of classification, development, 
habit and control of forest insects. Mr. Farrier 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Insects 3 (2-2) F S 

A basic course, covering the fundamentals of insect classification, development, 

food habits and controls. Mr. Brett 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 401 (ZO 401) Bibliographic Research in Biology 1 (1-0) F 

A general course intended to acquaint students with literature problems of the 
scientist, mechanics of the library book classifications, bibliographies, abstract 
journals, taxonomic indexes and preparation of scientific papers in agriculture, 
forestry, biology and their subdivisions. (Offered fall 1974 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Farrier 

ENT 410 (BS 410) Biology of Insects 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: ZO 201 

The course brings together current knowledge concerning major functional, 
behavioral, and adaptive characteristics of insects and stresses the biological 
principles underlying them. Topics will include growth and development, endocrines, 
receptor and nervous systems, flight and energetics, food, defenses, habitats, com- 



330 



munication, reproduction, orientation and learning, social organizations, and migra- 
tion and dispersal. Mr. Yamamoto 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 502 Insect Diversity 4 (2-4) F 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of biology 

An introduction to the external morphology of insects and a survey of the biology 
and identification of immature and adult insects. Evolutionary relationships of 
insects and other arthropods, speciation, insect zoogeography, nomenclature, and 
classical and recent approaches to systematics are also considered. 

Messrs. Axtell, Neunzig, Rabb, Young 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects 4 (2-6) S 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of biology, nine hours of chemistry, three hours of 
biochemistry, ENT 301 or equivalent 

Structure of morphological variations of organ systems in insects including con- 
siderations of their histology and function. Sensory and general physiology will 
then lead into basic elements of insect orientation and behavior. 

Messrs. Campbell, Hodgson, Yamamoto 

ENT 504 Insect Morphology 3 (1-4) F 

Prerequisite: ENT 502 

Concerned with external morphology, primary and comparative phases, with 
emphasis on knowledge and techniques which can be applied to specific problems. 
(Offered fall 1973-74 and alternate years.) Mr. Young 

ENT 511 Systematic Entomology 3 (1-4) F 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 or equivalent 

A somewhat detailed survey of the orders and families of insects, designed to 
acquaint the student with those groups and develop in the student some ability in 
the use of the taxonomic literature. (Offered fall 1974 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Young 

ENT 520 Insect Pathology 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: Introductory entomology and introductory microbiology 

A treatment of the noninfectious and infectious diseases of insects, the 
etiological agents and infectious processes involved, immunological responses 
and applications. (Offered spring 1973 and alternate years.) Mr. Brooks 

ENT 531 Insect Ecology 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: ENT 502 

The environmental relations of insects, including insect development, habits, 
distribution and abundance. (Offered fall 1973-74 and alternate years.) Mr. Rabb 

ENT 541 Immature Insects 2 (1-3) F 

Prerequisite: ENT 502 or equivalent 

An advanced study of the immature stages of selected orders of insects with 
emphasis on generic and specific taxa. Primary consideration is given to the larval 
stage, but a brief treatment of eggs and pupae is also included. (Offered fall 1974 
and alternate years.) Mr. Neunzig 

ENT 542 Acarology 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 or ZO 201 

A systematic survey of the mites and ticks with emphasis on identification, 
biology and control of the more common and economic forms attacking material, 
plants and animals including man. (Offered spring 1973 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Farrier 

331 



ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisites: ENT 312 or ENT 301 

The course is divided into two phases. The first deals with the basic causes of 
insect problems, an evaluation of the biological and economic aspects of insect 
attack and the fundamental methods employed in insect control. The second part 
deals with the critical chemical, physical and biological properties of compounds 
used for insect control. The material presented in the course is directed toward 
obtaining fundamental knowledge of the scientific principles underlying modern 
methods of protection of food, clothing, shelter and health from arthropods. 

Mr. Guthrie 

ENT 562 Agricultural Entomology 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A study of the taxonomy, biology and ecology of beneficial and injurious insects 
and arachnids of agricultural crops. Advantages and limitations of the advanced 
concepts for controlling insect and mite populations on different crops will be 
emphasized. (Offered spring 1973 and alternate years.) Messrs Bradley, Rock 

ENT 575 (PHY 575, ZO 575) Physiology of Invertebrates 3 (3-0) S 

(See zoology, page 484.) 

ENT 582 (ZO 582) Medical and Veterinary Entomology 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: ENT 301 or ENT 312 and ZO 315 or equivalent 

A study of the morphology, taxonomy, biology and control of the arthropod 
parasites and disease vectors of man and animals. The ecology and behavior of 
vectors in relation to disease transmission and control will be emphasized. (Offered 
spring 1973-74 and alternate years.) Mr. Axtell 

ENT 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Original research on special problems in entomology not related to a thesis 
problem, but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENT 602 Principles of Taxonomy 3 (1-4) S 

ENT 611 Biochemistry of Insects 3 (3-0) F 

ENT 622 Insect Toxicology 3 (2-3) S 

ENT 690 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

ENT 699 Research Credits Arranged F S 



NUTRITION 

NTR 301 (ANS 301, FS 301) Nutrition and Man 3 (3-0) F S 

(See animal science, page 250.) 

NTR 415 (ANS 415, PO 415) Comparative Nutrition 3 (3-0) F 

(See animal science, page 252, or poultry science, page 437.) 

NTR 416 (ANS 416) Quantitative Nutrition 3 (1-6) F 

Prerequisite: BCH 351 or equivalent 

332 



The quantitative evaluation of dietary ingredients and utilization of nutrients, 
and the application of quantitative methods to the determination of nutrient require- 
ments of animals. 

NTR 490 Nutrition Seminar 1 F S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Reviews, analysis and discussions of information and proposals relating to se- 
lected problems of current interest and concern in the field of human nutrition and 
allied areas. 

NTR 590 Topical Problems in Nutrition 1-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate or senior standing 

Discussions, readings and analysis of problems of current interest in nutrition 
and closely allied fields. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NTR 601 Amino Acids, Vitamins and Minerals in Nutrition 4 (4-0) S 

NTR 608 Energy Metabolism 3 (3-0) F 

NTR 690 Advanced Special Problems in Nutrition 1-6 F S 

NTR 699 Research in Nutrition 1-6 F S 

PHYSIOLOGY 

PHY 502 (ANS 502) Reproductive Physiology of 

Vertebrates 3 (3-0) S 

(See animal science, page 252.) 

PHY 513 (ZO 513) Comparative Physiology 4 (3-3) F 

(See zoology, page 482.) 

PHY 553 (BCH 553) Physiological Biochemistry 3 (3-0) S 

(See biochemistry, page 257.) 

PHY 575 (ENT 575, ZO 575) Physiology of Invertebrates 3 (3-0) S 

(See zoology, page 484.) 

PHY 590 Special Problems in Physiology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor 

Special study of a particular area of physiology not specifically related to the 
thesis problem. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent advances. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PHY 604 (ANS 604) Experimental Animal Physiology 4 (2-4) F 

PHY 690 Physiology Seminar 1 S 

PHY 695 Selected Topics in Physiology 1-4 

PHY 699 Physiological Research Credits Arranged 



333 



TOXICOLOGY 

TOX 510 Introduction to Biochemical Toxicology 2 (2-0) F 

Prerequisite: Biochemistry, senior status 

TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisite: Two years of biology 

TOX 590 Special Problems in Toxicology 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TOX 690 Toxicology Seminar 1 (1-0) S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 



FOOD SCIENCE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

FS 201 Food Science and Technology 3 (2-3) F 

An introduction to the sciences involved in the processing of foods. The role of 
foods and the food industry in the development of man. The relationships between 
production, processing and consumption. Principles and methods of food preserva- 
tion. Laboratories and field trips will acquaint students with typical processing 
operations and representative food industries. Mr. Warren 

FS 301 (ANS 301, NTR 301) Nutrition and Man 3 (3-0) F S 

(See animal science, page 250.) 

FS 331 (BAE 331) Food Engineering 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: PY 211 or PY 221 

Engineering concepts and their application to the food industry will be presented. 
Principles of thermodynamics, fluid flow, heat transfer, refrigeration and electricity 
will be emphasized. Messrs. Jones, Holmes 

FS 400 Foods and Nutrition 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: CH 220 

A study of the health of an individual as related to food and the ability of his 
body to use food. Evaluation of normal diets and factors that promote optimal 
nutrition throughout life, and the application of biochemistry to utilization of foods. 

Mr. Aurand 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CH 220 or CH 221 

An introduction to the biochemistry of foods with emphasis on the basic composi- 
tion, structure, properties and nutritive value of food. The chemistry of changes 
occurring during processing and utilization of foods will also be studied. 

Mr. Hansen 

FS 404 (PO 404) Poultry Products 3 (2-3) F 
Prerequisites: CH 101, BS 100 

Biological principles of processing, preservation and marketing of poultry meat 

and eggs. Mr. Ball 



334 



FS 405 (MB 405) Food Microbiology 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: MB 301 or MB 401 

The microorganisms of importance in foods, and their cultural and metabolic 
activities in foods. The physical and chemical destruction of microorganisms in 
foods and kinetics involved. The conversion of raw foods by microorganisms into 
altered foods, and the nutrition, growth and preservation of the cultures involved. 
Foods as vectors of human pathogens. The evolution of microbiological standards 
for foods. Mr. Speck 

FS 409 (ANS 409) Meat and Meat Products 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: CH 220 

A study of the basic principles involved in processing of beef, pork and lamb from 
the live animal to the various representative cured, fresh, canned and comminuted 
meat items currently produced. Mr. Blumer 

FS 432 Food Engineering II 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: FS 331 (BAE 331) 

The theory and principles of evaporation, drying and distillation will be dis- 
cussed with emphasis on applications in the processing of foods. Instrumentation 
and control systems used in the food industry will also be presented. Mr. Jones 

FS 490 Food Science Seminar 1 (1-0) S 
Prerequisite: Senior standing 

A review and discussion of scientific articles, new developments and topics 

of current interest in the food industry. Messrs. Roberts, Warren 

FS 491 Special Topics in Food Science 1-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor 

Special topics are selected or assigned in various phases of food science. Oppor- 
tunities to study current topics and/or problems and to gain additional knowledge 
and interpretative experience in a specific area. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FS 503 Food Analysis 3 (1-6) S 

Prerequisites: CH 315, BCH 351, FS 402 

A study of the principles, methods and techniques necessary for quantitative 
physical and chemical analyses of food and food products. Results of analyses will 
be studied and evaluated in terms of quality standards and governing regula- 
tions. Mr. Johnson 

FS 504 Advanced Food Chemistry 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: BCH 551 

Studies on the molecular properties of food components, their interactions and 
reactions and the physico-chemical alterations occurring in the maturation, har- 
vest, process and storage stages. Mr. Aurand 

FS 506 (MB 506) Advanced Food Microbiology 3 (1-6) S 

Prerequisite: FS 405 or equivalent 

The interactions of microorganisms in foods and their roles in food spoilage and 
bioprocessing. Cellular and molecular relationships in bacterial injury, repair and 
aging resulting from environmental stresses. Bacterial sporulations, germination, 
and physiological properties of bacterial spores. Mr. Speck 

FS 511 Food Research and Development 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: FS 331, FS 402, FS 405 



335 



A study of the scientific principles underlying the development of new and im- 
proved food products and processes. Special emphasis will be placed on the 
application of research and development principles to meat, poultry and fisheries 
industries. Mr. Webb 

FS 516 Quality Control of Food Products 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: FS 331, FS 402, FS 405 

A study of quality control fundamentals in the food industry including specifica- 
tions and standards, testing procedures, sampling, statistical and quality control 
and organization. Food products and industry problems will be used in the presenta- 
tion with special emphasis on dairy products. Mr. Hansen 

FS 521 (HS 521) Food Preservation 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: MB 401 or FS 405, FS 402 or BO 421 

An examination of principles and methods employed in the preservation of foods. 
Major emphasis will be focused on thermal, freezing, drying and fermentation 
processes and their relationship to physical, chemical and organoleptic changes in 
product. In addition, the relationship of these preservation techniques to the 
development of an overall processing operation will be considered. Mr. Carroll 

FS 562 (HS 562) Post-Harvest Physiology 3 (3-0) S 

(See horticultural science, page 358.) 

FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science Maximum 6 F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate or senior standing 

Analysis of scientific, engineering and economic problems of current interest in 
foods. Credit for this course will involve the scientific appraisal and solution of a 
selected problem. The problems are designed to provide training and experiences in 
research. Graduate Faculty 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FS 601 Theory of Physical Measurements of Biopolymers 3 (2-3) S 

FS 690 Seminar in Food Science 1 (1-0) F S 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science Credits Arranged 

FS 699 Research in Food Science Credits Arranged 



FORESTRY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 101 (WPS 101) Introduction to Forest Resources 1 (1-0) F 

The profession of forestry, its scope and opportunities; conservation of natural 

resources. Staff 

FOR 204 Silviculture 2 (0-6) Sum. 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Prerequisite: Junior standing in forestry 

Field exercises to enable the student to describe and measure factors of the 
forest environment, the ecology of forest communities, tree structure and growth, 
and tree and stand response to treatments which are normal parts of forest man- 
agement operations. Mr. Duffield 



336 



FOR 210 Dendrology — Gymnosperms 2 (1-2) S 

Prerequisite: BO 200 

Identification, relationships and distribution of gymnosperm trees, with emphasis 
on the characteristics of genera and higher taxonomic groups. Mr. Duffield 

FOR 211 Dendrology — Angiosperms 2 (1-2) F 

Prerequisite: BO 200 

Identification, relationships and distribution of angiosperm trees, with empha- 
sis on the characteristics of genera and higher taxonomic groups. Mr. Preston 

FOR 219 (WPS 219) Forest Economy and Its Operation 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: EC 206 or EC 212 

Multiple use concept of forestry; economic principles underlying production; 
investment problems; factors which influence demand for forest products. 

Mr. Steensen 

FOR 263 Dendrology 1 (0-3) Sum. 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Prerequisite: Junior standing in forestry 

Identification of trees, shrubs and woody vines of the Piedmont and mountain 
regions of North Carolina, principally by bark, foliage, flowers and developing 
fruits. Messrs. Duffield, Perry 

FOR 264 Forest Protection 2 (0-6) Sum. 
Sophomore Summer Camp 
Prerequisite: Junior standing in forestry 

Identification and control of forest insects and diseases. Behavior of fire and the 

meteorological factors affecting fire behavior. Supression of a large simulated 

fire, including use of modern ground equipment, aircraft and communications 

systems. Staff 

FOR 272 Forest Mensuration 3 (2-2) S 

Scientific basis for the measurements and estimates required in the management 
of forest resources and the goods and services derived from forest land. Included are 
theory of measurements, the required procedures, instrumentation and statistical 
prerequisites, with emphasis on sampling problems. Mr. Steensen 

FOR 273 (WPS 273) Quantitative Methods in Forest Resources 3 (2-2) F S 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

Problem solving techniques in the areas of forestry, wood technology, pulp and 
paper technology and recreation resources. Historical development of past techni- 
ques, assessment of present technology, and an evaluation of problem solving 
tools, including an introduction to the use of computers. Mr. Gemmer 

FOR 274 Mapping and Mensuration 4 (0-12) Sum. 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Prerequisite: FOR 272 

Use of surveying instruments and graphic methods in preparation of topographic 
and planimetric maps of forested areas. Measurement of height, diameter, bole form 
and age of trees. Study of stand density, growing stock levels and financial 
maturity. Stem analysis sampling and site index determinations. 

Messrs. Jervis, Steensen 

FOR 284 Utilization 1 (0-3) Sum. 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Prerequisite: Junior standing in forestry 

Inspection of wood industries; expositions on manufacturing processes. 

Staff 

337 



FOR 318 (PP 318) Forest Pathology 3 (2-3) S 

(See plant pathology, page 426.) 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Theory, principles and techniques of utilizing air photos as data sources for 
planning and management of renewable resources. Particular attention will 
be directed to stereoscopic identification and examination of the bioecological factors 
of terrain, plants, growing conditions, water, wildlife and the changes brought 
about by the activities of man. Mr. Lammi 

FOR 405 Forest Land Management 5 (2-6-2) F 

Prerequisites: FOR 272, FOR 452 

Management of forest lands for multiple benefits. The principles and techniques 
applied in regulating regeneration, species composition, growth and quality of 
woody vegetation; the use of planting, seeding, cutting, herbicides and fire in the 
management of vegetation. The application of financial principles in making 
decisions regarding investments in forest management. 

Messrs. Bryant, Duffield 

FOR 406 Forest Land Inventory and Planning 6 (2-12) S 

Prerequisite: FOR 405 

Applications of land management systems, including silviculture, protection, 
utilization and related problems in evaluation of assigned forest areas. Students 
complete a resource inventory and submit individual plans for management of the 
assigned tract. Mr. Bryant 

FOR 423 (WPS 423) Logging and Milling 3 (2-3) F 

(See wood and paper science, page 478.) 

FOR 435 (WPS 435) Systems Analysis in Forest Products 3 (3-0) S 

(See wood and paper science, page 478.) 

FOR 452 Silvics 4 (3-2) S 

Prerequisites: BO 200, CH 103, PY 221 or PY 212, mathematics through calculus 
Forest production can be increased by manipulating the physical environment, 
the genotype, and plant competition. The theoretical bases for these manipulations 
are the topics of this course in applied ecology. Mr. Perry 

FOR 462 Artificial Forestation 2 (1-3) S 

Biology of seed production for forest trees; forest tree seed collection, extraction, 
storage and testing; biology of tree seedling growth; soil aspects of nursery man- 
agement; forest nursery operation; soil aspects of site preparation, planting and 
direct seeding; reforestation operations. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate 
years.) Messrs. Duffield, Davey 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: A basic course in biology and economics; junior or senior standing 

The concepts and problems of coordinated use and management of the renewable 
resources namely soil, water, vegetation and fauna. Man as a biological factor 
interacting with other components of terrestrial ecological systems, particularly 
forests and related communities. Consideration is given to the interrelationships 
of forests, water, range-land, wildlife and outdoor recreation and their aesthetic 
and economic values. Inventory and management techniques and economic policies 
relating to renewable resources are examined and discussed. (Not open to forestry 
majors.) Mr. Preston 



338 



FOR 491 (WPS 491) Senior Problems in Forest 

Resources Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Problems selected with faculty approval in the areas of management or technology. 

Staff 

FOR 492 (WPS 492) Senior Problems in Forest Resources Credits Arranged 
Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Problems selected with faculty approval in the areas of management or technology. 

Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 501 Forest Influences and Watershed Management 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing 

Study of the effects of vegetation on climate, water and soil, with applications of 
the knowledge of forest influences to management of forest land resources, 
including conservation and yield of water, stabilization of streamflow and soils, 
reduction of sedimentation and general improvement of the environment. 

Mr. Maki 

FOR 512 Forest Economics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Six hours of microeconomics 

Objective is to gain understanding of the setting and functioning of the forest 
economy. Topics include: Supply and demand of industrial forest products and 
timber raw material; competition and pricing in the forest industries; competitive 
advantage of major forest regions; optimum rotation decision and financial 
returns to forest management; problems of timber production on non-industrial 
woodlands; economic analysis of non-timber forest products. Mr. Holley 

FOR 553 Forest Photogrammetry 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: Basic measurements course 

TJie stereoscopic use of aerial photographs for land use and vegetation interpre- 
tation will be emphasized. Some developments in remote sensing of environment 
will be reviewed, including infrared light, thermal infrared, microwave and radar 
imagery. Laboratory exercises include identification of plant cover and culture, 
measurement of elevations and heights of objects, determination of tree cover 
densities and volumes, road location and rudimentary mapping. Mr. Lammi 

FOR 571 Advanced Forest Mensuration 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisites: FOR 272, ST 311 

Study of the development of mathematical models to describe forest resources 
phenomena; criteria for evaluating the "goodness" of such models; and methods of 
data collection for use in the evaluation. Mr. Hafley 

FOR 572 Conservation Policy Issues 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing 

Analysis of the attitudes of selected private groups and public agencies toward 
multiple resource development. Special attention is directed to the trends in 
development of forest resource policies, timber management objectives, private 
industry activity in forestry development, recreation and multiple use, education, 
research, watersheds, governmental activity, interaction in international 
forestry affairs and the role of professional foresters and related specialists in 
multiple use resource management. Mr. Lammi 



339 



FOR 591 Forestry Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing 

Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, harvesting operations, 
lumber manufacturing, wood science, pulp and paper science, wood chemistry or 
forest management. Staff 

FOR 599 (WPS 599) Methods of Research in Forestry Credits Arranged 
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing 

Research procedures, problem analysis, working plan preparation interpretation 
and presentation of results; evaluation of selected studies by forest research organi- 
zations; techniques and constraints in the use of sample plots. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FOR 611 (GN 611) Forest Genetics 3 (3-0) S 

FOR 612 (GN 612) Advanced Topics in Quantitative Genetics 3 (3-0) F 

FOR 613 Special Topics in Silviculture 3 (2-1) F 

FOR 614 Advanced Topics in Forest Land Management 3 (3-0) F 

FOR 691 (WPS 691) Graduate Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

FOR 692 Advanced Forest Management Problems Credits Arranged 

FOR 699 Problems in Research Credits Arranged 

GENETICS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 3 (3-0) F S 

Fundamental principles of genetics will be presented at a level not requiring 
courses in biological sciences but sufficient for an understanding of the relation of 
genetics to society and technology. A survey will be given of current knowledge of 
inheritance of human traits. Messrs. Bostain, McKenzie 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: BS 100 (Junior standing) 

An introductory course. The physical and chemical basis of inheritance; genes 
as functional and structural units of heredity and development; qualitative and 
quantitative aspects of genetics variation. Mr. Mettler 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory 1 (0-2) F S 

Prerequisite or corequisite: GN 411 

Experiments and demonstrations to provide an opportunity to gain practical 
experience in crossing and classifying a variety of genetic materials including two 
generations of Drosophilia. Mr. Mettler, Graduate Assistants 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 504 Human Genetics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: GN 301 or GN 411, or equivalent 

340 



The basic principles needed for an understanding of the genetics of man will be 
presented. Current knowledge and important areas of research in human genetics 
will be surveyed. Messrs. Bostain, Schaffer 

GN 505 Genetics I 4 (3-2) F 

Prerequisites: GN 411 or equivalent 

Part I of a course sequence designed to serve as a foundation for graduate 
programs in genetics. As such, a balanced and comprehensive survey of each of 
the major fields of genetics must be presented in integrated form. Concepts based 
upon family analysis and a study of individual organisms will be presented here. 
Coverage will include general plant and animal genetics, biochemical and microbial 
genetics, and physiological and developmental genetics. 

Messrs. Grosch, Kloos 

GN 506 Genetics II 4 (3-2) S 

Prerequisite: GN 505 or consent of instructor 

This course represents the second portion of a two-semester sequence in general 
genetics, which is presented at the intermediate level and directed primarily to 
beginning graduate students. Emphasis is placed on the basic principles and modern 
concepts of cytogenetics, population genetics, and quantitative genetics. These sub- 
jects are integrated with those of the first semester course as much as possible, 
with the primary synthesis being directed toward the dynamic aspects of evolu- 
tionary theory, including both intra- and inter-populational phenomena. 

Mr. Mettler, Staff 

GN 508 (ANS 508) Genetics of Animal Improvement 3 (3-0) S 

(See animal science, page 252.) 

GN 513 Cytogenetics 4 (3-2) F 

Prerequisite: GN 506 or consent of instructor 

Classical and contemporary problems of chromosome structure, behavior and 
transmission. Euchromatin and heterochromatin. Recombination. Structural and 
numerical aberrations of chromosomes and the effects upon breeding systems of 
plants and animals. Interspecific hybridization. Polyploidy. 

Messrs. Galletta, Gerstel 

GN 520 (PO 520) Poultry Breeding 3 (2-2) F 

(See poultry science, page 437.) 

GN 532 (ZO 532) Biological Effects of Radiations 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: BS 100 or GN 301 or consent of instructor 

Qualitative and quantitative effects of radiations (other than the visible 
spectrum) on biological systems, to include both morphological and physiological 
aspects in a consideration of genetics, cytology, hystology, and morphogenesis. 

Mr. Grosch 

GN 540 (ZO 540) Evolution 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: GN 411, Undergraduate needs consent of instructor 

The facts and theories of evolution in plants and animals. The causes and con- 
sequences of organic diversity. Mr. Smith 

GN 541 (CS 541, HS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 3 (3-0) F 

(See crop science, page 290.) 

GN 542 (CS 542, HS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 2 (0-4) Sum. 
(See crop science, page 290.) 



341 



GN 545 (CS 545) Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants 2 (2-0) S 
(See crop science, page 290.) 

GN 550 (ZO 550) Experimental Evolution 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: GN 506 or consent of instructor 

Experimental evolution deals with processes examined at the inter- and intra- 
population levels. A review of the results from experimental population studies 
and analyses of natural populations concerning variation patterns and adapta- 
tion, natural selection, polymorphism, hybridization, introgression, population 
breeding structure, isolating mechanisms, etc., is made and interpreted in relation 
to Darwinian and the modern synthesis concepts of the origin of species. (Offered 
1973-74 and alternate years.) Mr. Mettler 

GN 561 (BCH 561, MB 561) Biochemical and Microbial Genetics 3 (3-0) F 
Prerequisites: BCH 351 or BCH 551, GN 411 or GN 505, MB 401 or equivalent 

A study of the development of the fields of biochemical genetics and microbial 
genetics emphasizing both techniques and concepts currently used in research in 
these areas. Includes lectures and discussions of current research publications. 

Mr. Armstrong 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GN 603 (ANS 603) Population Genetics in Animal 

Improvement 3 (3-0) F 

GN 611 (FOR 611) Forest Genetics 3 (3-0) S 

GN 612 (FOR 612) Advanced Topics in Quantitative Genetics 3 (3-0) F 

GN 613 (CS 613, HS 613) Plant Breeding Theory 3 (3-0) S 

GN 626 (ST 626) Statistical Concepts in Genetics 3 (3-0) S 

GN 631 Mathematical Genetics 3 (3-0) F 

GN 633 Physiological Genetics 3 (3-0) S 

GN 641 Colloquium in Genetics 2 (2-0) F S 

GN 691 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics 1-3 F S 

GN 699 Research Credits Arranged 

GEOLOGY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

GY 101 Earth Science 3 (3-0) S 

Not to be taken after GY 120 

Introductory course in general geology; changes in the earth, and underlying 
physical and life processes. 

GY 120 Physical Geology 3 (2-3) F S 

Dynamic processes acting on and within the earth; materials and makeup of the 

342 



earth's crust; emphasis on engineering and agricultural applications in the South- 
east. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. 

GY 208 Environmental Physical Geography 3 (2-3) S 

Study of the physical conditions on the earth's surface that influence human 
activities; factors of man's environment; including planetary conditions, geographic 
location, climate and weather, soils and land forms. 

GY 220 Physical- Historical Geology 4 (3-3) Sum. 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

A broad introductory survey of earth materials, processes and history. Common 
minerals and rocks. Effect of solar, gravitational, chemical and internal-thermal 
energy in transforming crustal constitution, structure, position and surface form. 
Measurement and subdivision of geologic time scale. The time scale, geosynclinal 
and tectonic cycles. Typical major geologic events in North America. Evolution of 
the main fossil groups. 

GY 222 Historical Geology 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: GY 120 

Chronologic account of the geologic events during the development of the earth's 
crust, mainly in North America. Evolution and environmental significance of the 
principal fossil animal and plant groups. Field trips. 

GY 323 Paleontology 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: GY 220 or GY 222 

Study of fossil life forms, with major emphasis on classification and structure 
of the invertebrate animals and their application to problems of correlation of strata. 
Lecture, laboratories and field trips. 

GY 330 Crystallography and Mineralogy 3 (2-3) S 

Corequisite: GY 120 

The elements of morphological crystallography. Space lattices, crystal symmetry, 
systems and classes. Stereographic projection of common forms. Identification of 
minerals by crystallographic features, cleavage, fracture, luster, color, streak, 
hardness, specific gravity, etc. Chemical composition, varieties, occurrence, associa- 
tions, important localities and uses. Crystal structures of selected minerals. 

GY 331 Optical Mineralogy and X-Ray Diffraction 4 (2-4) F 

Prerequisite: GY 330 

Techniques and underlying optical theory for identifying minerals with the 
polarizing microscope. Determination of index of refraction and birefringence; iso- 
tropic, uniaxial or biaxial character; optical sign and orientation. Adjunct 
apparatus for statistical and petrographic studies. Generation of X-rays, techniques 
and underlying theory for identifying by X-ray diffraction. 

GY 351 Tectonic Structures 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: GY 120 or GY 220 

Applications of the principles of mechanics to an understanding of rock deforma- 
tion. Analysis of fracture, solid flow and fluid flow structure imposed on igneous, 
sedimentary and metamorphic rock masses by internal crustal forces and gravita- 
tional movements. Stress-strain relations of rocks and minerals under surface 
conditions, and the modification of behavior which results from pore solutions and 
increase of confining pressure, temperature and time. 

GY 415 Mineral Exploration and Evaluation 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: GY 440, GY 452 

Application of the principles of geology, geophysics, and geochemistry to the 

343 



discovery and evaluation of mineral deposits. Design of mineral exploration and 
development programs based on knowledge of the unique thermodynamic, geo- 
chemical and tectonic features that control mineral formation and concentrations 
in well-known mining districts, especially those yielding ferrous, base, and precious 
metals. Review of economic and technological factors governing the value of 
mineral deposits. Field trips. 

GY 440 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisite: GY331 

Minerals, rocks and mineral deposits that are formed at high temperatures and 
pressures by crystallization or solidification of molten magma or by solid-state 
recrystallization of older rocks. Application of principles of thermodynamics and of 
phase-rule chemistry, and of the results of modern high pressure -temperature 
laboratory research on the stability fields of crystalline phases, to an understanding 
of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Identification, classification, occurrence, origin, 
and economic value of the principal igneous and metamorphic rocks. 

GY 452 Exogenic Materials and Processes 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisite: GY 331 

Identification, classification, geologic occurrences, origin and economic value 
of minerals, rocks and mineral deposits formed by physical, chemical, and biological 
processes at low temperatures and pressures at and near the earth's surface. Hydro- 
dynamics of sediment transport and deposition, settling velocities, and size sorting, 
chemical and biochemical precipitation from aqueous solutions. Principles of 
divisions of stratified terranes into natural units, correlation of strata, identification 
of depositional environments, and facies analysis. 

GY 461 Engineering Geology 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: GY 120 or GY 220 

The application of geologic principles to engineering practice; analysis of geologic 
factors and processes affecting specific engineering projects. (Offered fall 1973 and 
alternate years.) 

GY 462 Geological Surveying 3 (1-5) S 

Prerequisite: GY 120 

Methods of field observation and use of geologic surveying instruments in sur- 
face and underground work; representation of geologic features by maps, sections 
and diagrams. Lectures, laboratories and field work. 

GY 465 Geological Field Procedures 6 Sum. 

Prerequisite: GY 351 or special consent 

A six week summer field course. Practical field procedures and instruments 
commonly used to procure geologic data for evaluating mineral deposits, solving 
engineering: problems involving earth materials, and drawing scientific conclusions. 
Observation of geologic phenomena in their natural setting. Large and intermediate 
scale geologic mapping of surface features and large scale mapping underground in 
mine workings. 

GY 491, 492 Seminar on Selected Geologic Topics 1-3 F S 

Reports and discussion of geological topics of current interest with attention to 
methodology, bibliography and research techniques. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GY 522 Petroleum Geology 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: GY 452 

Properties, origin and modes of occurrence of petroleum and natural gas. Geologic 
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and economic features of the principal oil and gas fields, mainly in the United States. 
(Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) 

GY 524 Continental Evolution 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: GY 222, GY 351, GY 440, GY 452 

Study of the stratigraphic and tectonic events which have shaped the continents, 
with emphasis upon North America; field trips. (Offered fall 1974 and alternate 
years.) 

GY 532 Ore Microscopy 3 (0-6) F 

Prerequisite: GY331 

The theory and technique of microscopic investigation of opaque ore minerals, 
ores and mill products produced by benefication of ores. Studies of compositions 
and textures of materials in polished surfaces are based on observations of 
optical and physical properties, etch reactions and microchemical tests. (Offered 
fall 1973 and alternate years.) 

GY 542 Microscopic Petrography 3 (1-4) S 

Prerequisite: GY 440 

Systematic study by microscopic techniques of the constitution and origin of 
consolidated rocks. 

GY 545 Advanced Igneous Petrology 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: GY 440 

Study of physiochemical principles related to igneous and metamorphic pedo- 
genesis; consideration of general principles and specific problems such as differen- 
tiation, origin of magmas and metamorphism. (Offered fall 1973 and alternate 
years.) 

GY 546 Advanced Metamorphic Petrology 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: GY 440 

Study of physiochemical principles related to igneous petrogenesis; consideration 
of general principles and specific problems including the origin, differentiation 
and emplacement of magmas and the possible relationships of igneous processes to 
global tectonics. (Offered fall 1974 and alternate years.) 

GY 552 Exploratory Geophysics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: GY 351, PY 208 or PY 212 

Fundamental principles underlying all geophysical methods; procedure and 
instruments involved in gravitational, magnetic, seismic, electrical and other 
methods of studying geological structures and conditions. Spontaneous potential, 
resistivity, radioactivity, temperature, and other geophysical logging methods. 
Study of applications and interpretations of results. (Offered spring 1973 and 
alternate years.) 

GY 563 Applied Sedimentology 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: GY 452, ST 361 

Extension of GY 452, with emphasis on coarser grained detrital and chemical 
sedimentary rocks. Sampling of sedimentary population, critical study of assump- 
tions underlying standard measurement techniques; treatment, testing and evalua- 
tion of sedimentary data; application to problems in sedimentology. 

GY 564 LlTHOSTRATIGRAPHY AND BASIN ANALYSIS 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: GY 452 or graduate standing 

Fabric of large sedimentary basins in terms of the spatial distribution of com- 
ponent major rock facies; current litho-genetic models illustrating internal lithic 
relationships, variability, and predictability; evolution of litho-genetic units; 
comparison with recent equivalents; field trips. 

345 



GY 565 Hydrogeology 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: GY 452 

Occurrence and sources of surface and subsurface water. Relationships of sur- 
face water to subsurface water. Rock properties affecting infiltration, movement, 
lateral and vertical distribution, and quality of ground water. Determination of 
permeability, capacity, specific yield, and other hydraulic characteristics of acqui- 
rers. Principles of well design, legal aspects of water supplies. (Offered spring 1973 
and alternate years.) 

GY 567 Geochemistry 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: CH 331 or CH 433 

The quantitative distribution of elements in the earth's crust, the hydrosphere 
and the atmosphere. Application of the laws of chemical equilibrium and resultant 
chemical reactions to natural earth systems. Geochemical application of Eh-pH 
diagrams. Geochemical cycles. Isotype geochemistry. (Offered fall 1974 and alternate 
years.) 

GY 581 Geomorphology 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: GY 120 plus appropriate background 

The study of land forms and their relations to processes, stages of development, 
and adjustments to structure. Emphasis on mass-wasting, fluvial geomorphology 
of humid and arid climates, coasts, karst, and eolian processes. Lectures, map 
interpretations, and field trips. 

GY 582 Quaternary Geology 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: GY 120, senior standing 

Glaciology, glacial geology, Pleistocene stratigraphy, periglacial geomorphology; 
Quaternary volcanism, tectonism, and sea-level fluctuations; late Cenozoic climate 
changes; field trips. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) 

GY 583 Photogeology 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: GY 120 

The stereoscopic study of aerial photographs to obtain geologic information. The 
construction of bedrock and surficial geologic maps from aerial photographs. Aspects 
of remote sensing useful in geologic interpretation. 

GY 584 (MAS 584) Marine Geology 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: GY 452 or GY 120 plus appropriate background 

Morphology, structure and origin of ocean basins with their diverse features and 
their relations to the continents. Physical and chemical properties of the oceans, 
sedimentation in the marine environment and near-shore features. The economic 
potential of mineral resources derived from oceanic areas. (Offered spring 1974 and 
alternate years.) 

GY 593 Advanced Topics in Geology 1-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of staff 

Special study of some advanced phases of geology. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GY 611, 612 Advanced Economic Geology 3 (3-0) F S 

GY 695 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

GY 699 Geological Research Credits Arranged 



346 



GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance 2 (2-0) F S 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

This is a course designed to provide basic principles of guidance for teachers, 
teacher-counselors, administrators and others in the school, as well as workers in 
other areas such as the community agency, business, industry, group work and the 
like. 

Among the topics covered are need for guidance; basis of guidance services, 
programs of studying the individual; counseling for educational, vocational, social 
and personal problems; group procedures in guidance. Emphasis is on the practical 
application of guidance principles and procedures. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 520 Personnel and Guidance Services 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Six hours of education or psychology 

An introduction to the philosophies, theories, principles and practices of personnel 
and guidance services; the relationship of personnel services with the purposes 
and objectives of the school and the curriculum. Graduate Staff 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services Credits Arranged F S 
Prerequisite: 18 hours in department 

A continuous full-time internship of at least one-half semester. Framework of 
school and community. Work with students, teachers, administrators, guidance and 
pupil personnel workers, parents, and resource personnel in the community. Super- 
vision of intern by guidance personnel in a school as well as by course instructors. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 524 Occupational Information 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: Six hours education or psychology, ED 520 or equivalent 

This course is intended to give teachers, counselors, placement workers and 
personnel workers in business and industry an understanding of how to collect, 
classify, evaluate and use occupational and educational information. This will in- 
clude a study of the world of work, sources of occupational information, establishing 
an educational-occupational information library, using educational, occupational 
and social information and sociological and psychological factors, influencing 
career planning. Graduate Staff 

ED 530 Group Guidance 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: Six hours education or psychology, ED 520 or equivalent 

This course is designed to help teachers, counselors, administrators and others 
who work with groups, or who are responsible for group guidance activities, to 
understand the theory and principles of effective group work, to develop skill in 
using specific guidance techniques, and to plan and organize group activities in 
the secondary school and other institutions. Graduate Staff 

ED 533 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, ED 520 or equivalent 

This course is designed for school guidance counselors, prospective counselors, 
personnel and guidance directors, and school administrators. The philosophy and 
scope of guidance and personnel services; the functions and responsibilities of 
personnel involved; basic principles and current practices in planning, developing, 
operating and supervising guidance and personnel services will be considered. 

Graduate Staff 

347 



ED 534 Guidance in the Elementary School 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: Nine hours psychology or consent of instructor 

Designed for acquainting elementary school teachers, counselors and adminis- 
trators with theory, practice and organization of elementary school guidance. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Nine hours psychology or consent of instructor 

Examines practices in various areas of student personnel work. Studies both 
structure and function of personnel programs in higher education. Graduate Staff 

ED 540 Individual and Group Appraisal I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: ED 520, PSY 535, or equivalent 

Use of group tests of intelligence, interest and achievement in educational and 
career planning and in placement. Theories of intelligence and interest will be 
followed by laboratory in evaluating, administering and interpreting widely used 
group tests of intelligence, interest and achievement. Emphasis is on the use of 
group tests in group guidance. Graduate Staff 

ED 590 Individual Problems in Guidance Maximum 6 F S 

Prerequisite: Six hours graduate work in department or equivalent 

Intended for individual or group studies of one or more of the major problems in 
guidance and personnel work. Problems will be selected to meet the interests of 
individuals. The workshop procedure will be used whereby special projects, reports, 
and research will be developed by individuals and by groups. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory 3 (3-0) F 

ED 633 Techniques of Counseling 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work Maximum 3 F S 

ED 640 Individual and Group Appraisal II 3 (3-0) F 

ED 641 Laboratory and Practicum Experiences in Counseling 2-6 F S 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling 3 (1-8) F S 

HISTORY 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES: (200 level) Open to all students without pre- 
requisite. Previous course work in any particular field of history is not necessary 
in order to take any introductory courses. 

HI 204 Western Civilization to 1400 3 (3-0) F S 

A survey of Western Civilization from earliest times to the end of the medieval 
era, treating the major civilizations which contributed to the development of West- 
ern Civilization until the end of the medieval period. 

HI 205 Western Civilization Since 1400 3 (3-0) F S 

An introductory survey of the development of Western Civilization during the 
modern period from the Renaissance to the present. 

348 



HI 207 The Ancient World to 180 A.D. 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of the ancient cultures of the Middle East and Graeco-Roman civiliza- 
tion. Includes study of Egyptian, Minoan, Mycenean, Greek, and Roman societies 
and cultures. 

HI 208 The Middle Ages 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of medieval civilization as it emerged from the declining Roman empire 
through its apogee in the 13th century. Treatment of the transition from the 
classical to the medieval world, the impact of the Germanic influx, and the political, 
economic, and social institutions of the High Middle Ages. 

HI 209 Renaissance to Waterloo 1300-1815 3 (3-0) F S 

A survey of all aspects of the period of transition from the medieval to the 
modern world. Includes study of the decline of medieval institutions, the Renais- 
sance, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, rise of Absolutism, the English 
17th century revolution, the French Revolution and Napoleonic era. 

HI 210 Europe Since 1815 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of the major political, economic and cultural developments in Europe 
since 1815. Subjects treated are the settlement of the Congress of Vienna, the 
impact of liberalism and nationalism, thought and culture of the 19th and 20th 
centuries, European imperialism, and the two World Wars and their aftermath. 

HI 215 Latin America to 1826 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of the origins and development of social, political, economic and relig- 
ious institutions from pre-conquest times to the achievement of independence. The 
ancient American cultures; Spain and Portugal before 1492; the conquest and 
settlement; Spanish rule in theory and practice; economic life; the Church; land 
and labor; the African contribution; the Portuguese in Brazil; the independence 
movements. 

HI 216 Latin America Since 1826 3 (3-0) F S 

A survey of social, political, economic and intellectual life in the 19th and 20th 
centuries. Major attention is given to Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Peru and Cuba. 
Topics include the social structure of the new nations; 19th century liberalism; the 
force of tradition; relations with Europe and the United States; the Monroe 
Doctrine and U. S. intervention; economic change; caudillo rule; 20th century 
upheavals; the Mexican Revolution; Peron's Argentina; Castro and Latin America. 

HI 233 The World in the 20th Century 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of national and international problems in the Western and non- Western 
world, including institutions and ideas at the turn of the century, origins and 
effects of the First World War, the post-war challenge to Western demo- 
cratic supremacy from within and without, the Second World War, and problems 
of the post-war period. 

HI 241 United States to 1783 3 (3-0) F S 

The European background of American history; establishment of English colonies 
in America; colonial historical development; the conflict with England, the securing 
of independence and the establishment of independent government. 

HI 242 United States 1783-1845 3 (3-0) F S 

Inauguration of the new nation; territorial expansion and the westward move- 
ment; growth of democracy and social reform; development of national feeling and 
sectional tensions. 



349 



HI 243 United States 1845-1914 3 (3-0) F S 

The coming of the Civil War; the war and the reconstruction of the nation; the 
rise of industrialism and the Populist and Progressive response; the emergence 
of the United States as a world power. 

HI 244 United States Since 1914 3 (3-0) F S 

The United States and the First World War; the society of the 1920's; the Great 
Depression and the New Deal; the Second World War and post-war international 
problems; the Truman and Eisenhower years; America in the 1960's and 1970's. 

HI 263 Traditional East Asia: Prehistory to 1800 3 (3-0) F S 

An introduction to the civiliations of China, Japan and Korea prior to the pene- 
tration of Western institutions and ideas. 

HI 264 Modern East Asia: 1800 to Present 3 (3-0) F S 

An introduction to the impact of modernization on China, Japan and the 
smaller nations of East Asia. 

HI 265 Introduction to South Asian Civilization 3 (3-0) F S 

A general introduction to the traditional civilizations of the Indo-Pakistani sub- 
continent. A broad cultural approach will be used in which the historical, political, 
economic, religious and literary factors which shaped the central thought patterns 
and institutions of these civilizations will be presented. Concentration will be on the 
three major religious systems which are the core of the Indo-Pakistani way of life: 
Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam. 

HI 266 Modern South Asia 1700 to Present 3 (3-0) F S 

This course will deal with the major developments in the history of modern South 
Asia from the British conquest to the present. Emphasis will be on the development 
of Indian and Pakistani nationalism under British rule, on the changes in Indo- 
Pakistani society under the impact of modernization and on post-independence 
histories of India and Pakistan. 

HI 272 The Afro-American in America 3 (3-0) F S 

After a brief consideration of his African background, the course considers the 
particular role, experience and influence of the Afro-American at various stages 
in the development of the United States. 

SERVICE COURSES: (300 level) Courses required in particular curricula but 
also open to general election. Prerequisite: Three hours of history. 

HI 321 Ancient and Medieval Science 3 (3-0) F 

This course will focus on selected topics in the history of pre-modern science 
in an effort to determine how this "science" differed from the science that emerged 
after the "Scientific Revolution" of the seventeenth century. Attention will be paid 
to the relations of science to social and economic factors, technology, magic, and 
religion. Examples will be taken from pre-history, Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, 
India, Greece, Rome, Islam and the medieval and Renaissance West. Mrs. Sylla 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science 3 (3-0) F S 

The "Scientific Revolution" of the 16th and 17th centuries is presented, and 
Newton's System analyzed. The origins of modern chemistry, geology and 
evolution theory are discussed, and the radical revision of Newtonian theory in 
the 20th century is briefly described. These developments are always considered 
within the context of the great historic movements of their time. 

Mrs. Sylla, Mr. Mulholland 



350 



HI 341 Technology in History 3 (3-0) S 

This course traces the role of technology in society from earliest times to the 
present. The achievements of technology and their impact on society as a whole 
are examined along with the social status, education, sources of support, and 
relationships to church and government of scientists and engineers — in various 
periods. Mr. Mulholland 

HI 351 English History (to 1688) 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of the history of England from the earliest times to 1688, stressing the 
evolution of the English constitution and the political, social, and economic back- 
ground of English cultural development. Messrs. Carlton, Downs 

HI 352 English History (Since 1688) 3 (3-0) F S 

A study of the history of England from 1688 to the present, stressing the evo- 
lution of the English constitution and the political, social, and economic background 
of English cultural development. Messrs. Carlton, Downs 

HI 370 (EC 370) The Rise of Industrialism 3 (3-0) F 

(See economics, page 294.) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NOTE: Prerequisite: (U00 level) Three hours of history. 

HI 400 Civilization of the Ancient Near East 3 (3-0) S 

A survey of the civilization of Mesopotamia and Egypt from earliest times to 

the fall of Babylon in 539 B.C. Mr. Sack 

HI 403 Ancient Greek Civilization 3 (3-0) S 

The history of the Hellenes is traced from the Minoan civilization through Alex- 
ander's legacy, with readings in Herodotus and Thucydides. Mr. Sack 

HI 404 Rome to 180 A.D. 3 (3-0) F 

Tracing the development of Rome from the Etruscans through Emperor Marcus 
Aurelius (180 A. D.), this course examines critically the great political achievement 
which saw Rome rise from a cattle-town on the Tiber to the head of an Empire. 
This rise is examined through readings in Livy and Tacitus. Mr. Riddle 

HI 406 From Roman Empire to Middle Ages 3 (3-0) S 

Using primarily translated Latin sources the course deals with the decline of 
Imperial Rome, and its succession by new Christian, Germanic, and Islamic civili- 
zations. Mr. Riddle 

HI 410 Italian Renaissance 3 (3-0) F 

Renaissance humanism, an educational ideal and an awareness of man as the 
sole creator in the historical world, will be examined in its relationship to the 
Italian republics and princedoms of the 14th through the 16th century. 

Mr. Banker 

HI 411 The Protestant and Catholic Reformation 

of the 16th Century 3 (3-0) S 

A study of the conditions and criticisms which led to reform and the nature of 
the institutional and theological changes affected by the various churches and sects. 
Special attention will be given to Luther and Calvin. Mr. Banker 



351 



HI 414 The Age of Absolutism 3 (3-0) F 

This course will concentrate on the development of royal absolutism in 17th 
century Europe, the nature of the institutions which supported it, the particular 
cultural forms and patterns which it generated, and the reasons for its decline in 
the 18th century. Mr. Greenlaw 

HI 415 Revolutionary Europe 3 (3-0) S 

A broadly based analysis of Europe's first revolutionary era. Starts with the 
revolution in thought called the Enlightenment, then examines the causes and 
character of the Revolution in France, and finally traces the impact of these events 
in France and Europe. Mr. Greenlaw 

HI 418 Fascism in Germany and Italy, 1919-1945 3 (3-0) S 

Hitler and Mussolini: two aspects of European Fascism in the interwar period. 

Mr. Suval 

HI 425 Tudor and Stuart England 3 (3-0) S 

A study of the permanent political crisis set into motion by the Reformation 
which culminates in the English Civil War. Primary emphasis will be given to cer- 
tain key developments in social, political and economic life such as the development 
of a new concept of kingship, the growing independence of Parliament, the search 
for religious uniformity and the changing status of the aristocracy and gentry. 

Mr. Carlton 

HI 428 England in the Age of the American Revolution 3 (3-0) F 

A study of English political, economic, social and imperial ideas and institu- 
tions between 1763 and 1783 with special emphasis on how these affected and were 
effected by the War of the American Revolution. Mr. Downs 

HI 429 Twentieth Century Britain 3 (3-0) S 

An examination of British political, social and economic history since 1914, with 
special reference to the effects of two world wars, the growth of the welfare state, 
British decline as a power, and the search for a new role in the world. 

Mr. Carlton 

HI 430 France Since the Revolution 3 (3-0) S 

An examination of the major trends in French history since the downfall of 
Napoleon I. Cultural, economic, social and intellectual trends are stressed as well 
as the political. The ways in which France has been a seedbed for new movements 
in Europe are particularly noted. Mr. Brown 

HI 432 Germany Since 1848 3 (3-0) S 

A history of Germany from the revolutions of 1848 to the present, concentrating 

on the problems of German nationalism and political and social reform. Mr. Suval 

HI 435 A Century of Nationalism: East-Central Europe, 1848-1948 3 (3-0) S 
A study of nationalistic movements, largely within the Austro-Hungarian, Rus- 
sian, Ottoman, and German Empires for independent sovereignty, and with the 
attainment of this goal the continuing conflicts within and between the successor 
states and their roles in the conflicts of the great 20th-century forces. Mr. Brown 

HI 438 History of Russia to 1881 3 (3-0) F 

This course surveys the social, political, economic and cultural history of Kiev 
Rus., Muscovy and Imperial Russia through the period of the emancipation of 
the serfs and the fundamental reforms that followed. While the emphasis is on 
internal developments, some attention is given to foreign policy. Mrs. Wheeler 



352 



HI 439 History of Russia Since 1881 3 (3-0) S 

This course surveys the history of Russia and the Soviet Union from the great 
reforms of the 19th century to modern times, with emphasis on the political, relig- 
ious, and cultural trends that underlie the development of the Russian state and 
society and the position of the U.S.S.R. in the world today. (Some attention is 
given to foreign policy with emphasis on Soviet period.) Mrs. Wheeler 

HI 442 United States: Revolution to Constitution 3 (3-0) F 

The historical steps in the establishment of the United States as an independent 
nation. The conflict with Great Britain after 1763 leading to the declaring of 
independence; the war for American independence in its military and diplomatic 
aspects; the domestic problems; the foreign relations in the post-war years; the 
establishment of government in the new nation. Mr. Seegers 

HI 443 The Age of Jefferson 3 (3-0) S 

A study of the political, social, economic, intellectual and diplomatic aspects of 
the history of the United States from the adoption of the Constitution in 1789 
through the second Madison administration. The establishment of the federal govern- 
ment; the implementation of Hamilton's financial system; foreign affairs during 
the Wars of the French Revolution; the rise of political parties; the triumph of the 
Jeffersonian Republicans; the territorial expansion of the United States; the War 
of 1812. Mrs. Pulley 

HI 444 The Age of Jackson, 1815-1850 3 (3-0) F 

The major political, economic, cultural, and economic developments from the 

Era of Good Feelings to the Compromise of 1850, with readings organized 

around four topics related to four major interpretations of the period Mrs. King 

HI 446 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 (3-0) S 

A study of the period of sectional strife and war, with an examination of the im- 
pact of the war on the United States and the efforts to reconstruct the South on a 
national basis. Mr. Harris 

HI 448 Populism and Progressivism 3 (3-0) F 

This course concentrates on the two most important general reform movements 
in the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The "agrarian 
crusade" and the Progressive movement are examined in the context of the econo- 
mics, politics, society, and ethics of their time. Mr. Noblin 

HI 452 Recent America 3 (3-0) F 

An examination of some of the major problems in American life since 1939. 

Mr. Hobbs 

HI 454 U. S. Foreign Relations 3 (3-0) F 

An examination of the origins of American foreign policy and the conduct of 
diplomacy in the era since the United States became a world power. Stress is 
given to the complex array of personalities, ideas, institutions and forces involved 
in shaping and implementing policy. Mr. Beers 

HI 458 Significant Figures in 20th Century America 3 (3-0) S 

An examination of the impact of American life in the 20th century of some 

important people in the fields of politics, war and peace, sports and various 

forms of communication. Mr. Hobbs 

HI 461 Civilization of the Old South 3 (3-0) S 

A study of the distinctive features of the Old South as part of the regional 



353 



development of United States history. Consideration is given to the colonial factors 
in the making of the South, the development of the plantation system and Negro 
slavery, the Southern social order, intellectual and cultural life, economic develop- 
ment, and the rise of Southern nationalism. Mr. Elliott 

HI 463 North Carolina to 1860 3 (3-0) F 

A study of the history of North Carolina from the earliest explorations through 

the 1850's. Mr. Elliott 

HI 464 North Carolina Since 1860 3 (3-0) S 

A study of the history of North Carolina from the eve of the Civil War to the 

present. Mr. Noblin 

HI 467 Modern Mexico 3 (3-0) F 

A study of the major developments in Mexican national life since 1821. The first 
half of the course will deal with the 19th century: the era of Santa Anna, the war 
with the United States, the Reform, the French intervention, and the dictatorship 
of Porfirio Diaz. The second half will investigate the 1910 Revolution and the 
resulting transformation of Mexico's political, social and economic institutions. 
A reading knowledge of Spanish will be helpful but is not required. Mr. Beezley 

HI 469 Twentieth-Century Latin American Revolutions 3 (3-0) F 

A study of the variety of revolutionary changes in certain 20th century Latin 
American republics. Readings and lectures will concentrate on Argentina, Bolivia, 
Peru, and Cuba, but will include some consideration of other nations. The course 
will examine movements dedicated to the overthrow of traditional liberal 
institutions and their replacement by other political, social, and economic systems. 

Mr. Beezley 

HI 470 (EC 470) Evolution of the American Economy 3 (3-0) S 

(See economics, page 298.) 

HI 471 Revolutionary China 3 (3-0) S 

An intensive examination of the failure of traditional Chinese society to find 

means of accommodation with the West and of the emergence of the revolutionary 

Communist state and society. Mr. Metzgar 

HI 472 Modern Japan, 1850 to Present 3 (3-0) F 

An intensive examination of Japan's emergence as a nation and world power. 

Staff 

HI 473 20th Century Asian Revolutionaries 3 (3-0) S 

An intensive study using psycho-historical techniques for the comparative study 

of the lives and works of four great figures in twentieth century Asian history: Sun 

Yat-sen, Mao Tse-tung, Mohandas Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Metzgar 

HI 477 British Empire and Commonwealth 3 (3-0) S 

A history of the British Empire and Commonwealth in the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies, stressing the evolution of colonial self-government and the transformation of 
imperial relationships in the former British dependencies in Canada, the West 
Indies, Africa, Asia and the Pacific Islands. Mr. Downs 

HI 491 Seminar in History 3 (3-0) F S 

Open to seniors majoring or concentrating in history. Open to other seniors and 

graduate students with departmental permission. Staff 



354 



HI 492 Seminar in History 3 (3-0) F S 

Required of all history majors. Open to other seniors and graduate students 

with departmental permission. Staff 

HI 498 Special Topics in History 1-6 F S 

Students in the course will read extensively on special predetermined topics 
focused around a central theme. The topics and themes will vary each year de- 
pending on the particular interests and competence of the assigned professor. 

Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HI 500 (BS 500) The Development of Contemporary 

Concepts in Biology 3 (3-0) S 

(See biological sciences, page 262.) 

NOTE: The prerequisite for all history courses at the 500- and 600-level is six 
hours advanced history or equivalent. 

HI 515 High Middle Ages 3 (3-0) S 

An analysis of various aspects of medieval culture. Selected topics such as the 
revival of the Roman Empire, monastic and papal reform, the rise of universities, 
the evolution of representative bodies, the Gothic style, troubadour and goliardic 
poetry, scholasticism, and the revival of Roman law will be examined using source 
readings. Research techniques will also be discussed. Mr. Riddle 

HI 530 Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon 3 (3-0) F 

An examination of aspects of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era which 

are currently subject to differing interpretations. Mr. Greenlaw 

HI 532 History of Great Britain, 1820-1914 3 (3-0) F 

A history of Great Britain from the Regency of George IV to the outbreak of 
World War I with special emphasis on studies in depth of the most significant 
developments in constitutional, religious, and economic ideas and institutions. 

Mr. Downs 

HI 536 History of International Relations Since 1870 3 (3-0) F 

A study of European diplomatic history and of the larger area of world inter- 
national relations from the Franco- Prussian war through both World Wars up to 
the present. Emphasis on policies and attempts to solve international problems. 

Mr. Brown 

HI 545 The American Civil War 3 (3-0) F 

The course traces and analyzes events that led to the disruption of the union and 

provides an intensive study of the war, with emphasis upon its nonmilitary aspects. 

Only the major military campaigns are discussed. Mr. Harris 

HI 546 Reconstruction of the American Union 3 (3-0) S 

This course is an in-depth study of the difficulties involved in the restoration 
and readjustment of American society after the Civil War. Special attention is 
given to social and economic conditions in the defeated South, military reconstruc- 
tion and Republican ascendancy in the region. Mr. Harris 

HI 548 The American Response to Industrialism 3 (3-0) S 

Focuses on the industrialization of the American economy and on efforts to deal 

with the ensuing transformation of American life through politics, social institutions 

and ideas. Mr. Noblin 

355 



HI 551 History and Principles of the Administration 

of Archives and Manuscripts 3 (3-0) F 

A study of the nature, importance and use of original manuscript resources; the 
history and evolution of written records, and the institutions administering them. 

Mr. Coker 

HI 552 Application of Principles of Administration 

of Archives and Manuscripts 3 (3-0) F 

Internship training in the application of the principles and practices of archival 

management. Mr. Coker 

HI 561 U. S. Far Eastern Relations 3 (3-0) S 

A study of American expansion into the Pacific and involvement in Asian affairs. 
Both official diplomatic relations and unofficial contacts (by missionaries, edu- 
cators, businessmen, and the like) which influenced Americans, are examined. 

Mr. Beers 

HI 565 The History of Urban Life in the U. S., 1607-1865 3 (3-0) F 

The history of urban life in the United States, 1607-1865. This course is designed 

primarily to give the student an understanding of the historical background of 

today's urban problems. Mrs. King 

HI 566 The History of Urban Life in the U. S., 1865-Present 3 (3-0) S 

The history of urban life in the United States, from 1865 to present. This course 
is designed primarily to give the student an understanding of the historical back- 
ground of today's urban problems. Mrs. King 

HI 572 History of Soviet Russia Since 1930 3 (3-0) F 

An analysis of the domestic and foreign policies of the Soviet Union since 1930 
with special emphasis on the position of the Soviet Union in the world since 1945. 

Mrs. Wheeler 

HI 598 Special Topics in History 1-6 F S 

An investigation of topics of particular interest to advanced students under the 

direction of faculty members on a tutorial basis. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

HI 601 Historiography and Historical Method 3 (3-0) F 

HI 602 Seminar in American History 3 (3-0) S 

HI 604 Seminar in European History 3 (3-0) S 

HI 606 Seminar in Diplomatic History 3 (3-0) S 

HI 699 Research in History Credits Arranged 

HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 3 (3-0) F S 

Attention will be directed to the basic principles involved in the application of 

these principles to the production, processing and utilization of fruit, vegetable and 



356 



ornamental crops. Attention will also be given to the economic importance and 
distribution of horticultural enterprises. Mr. Cochran 

HS 211, 212 Ornamental Plants 3 (1-5) F S 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

Distribution, botanical characters and relationships, adaptation and usage of 
ornamental trees, shrubs, vines and herbaceous plants. Mr. Southall 

HS 301 Plant Propagation 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisite: BS 100 or BO 200 

A study of principles, methods and practices in seedage, cuttage, division, bud- 
ding, grafting and other methods of propogation. Consideration will also be 
given to scion and stock relationships and dormancy. Mr. Nelson 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 3 (2-3) F 

The application of the principles of design to the landscaping of small properties 
and the selecting and planting of trees, shrubs, flowers and lawn grasses. Students 
will be required to work out detailed landscape plans. Field trips will be made to 
homes and gardens. Mr. Halfacre 

HS 411 Nursery Management 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200 

The principles and practices involved in the production, management and mar- 
keting of field-grown and container-grown nursery plants. Field trips will be taken. 

Mr. Halfacre 

HS 414 Residential Landscaping 4 (2-6) S 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, HS 211, HS 212 

The landscape planning and development of residential properties to create an 
aesthetical and functional landscape composition to complement the home. Stu- 
dents will be required to complete planting plans, including design, plant lists, 
planting details and technical specifications. Mr. Halfacre 

HS 421 Fruit Production 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200 

A study of identification, adaptation and methods of production and marketing of 
the principal tree and small fruits. Modern practices as related to selection of sites, 
nutritional requirements, management practices and marketing procedures will be 
discussed. Mr. Correll 

HS 432 Vegetable Production 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200 

A study of the origin, importance, distribution, botanical relationships and 
principles of production and marketing of the major vegetable crops. Mr. Miller 

HS 441 Floriculture I 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200 

The scope and importance of the commercial flower industry; the basic principles 
and practices involved in the production and marketing of flowers grown in the 
greenhouse and in the field. (Offered fall 1973 and alternate years.) Mr. Larson 

HS 442 Floriculture II 3 (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200 

Principles and methods of production of commercial flower crops in the green- 
house and in the field including fertilization, moisture, temperature and light 
relationships, insect and disease control, and marketing of cut flowers and pot 
plants. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) Mr. Larson 



357 



HS 471 Arboriculture 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200 

A study of the principles and practices in the care and maintenance of orna- 
mental trees and shrubs, such as pruning, fertilization, control of insects and dis- 
eases, and tree surgery. Field trips will be taken. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate 
years.) Mr. Cannon 

HS 491 Senior Seminar in Horticultural Science 1 (1-0) F S 
Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Presentation of scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special 

problems in horticulture and related fields. Mr. Donoho 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HS 514 (CS 514) Principles and Methods in Weed Science 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisite: CS 414 or equivalent 

Studies of the losses caused by weeds, the ecology of weeds, biological control, 
basic concepts of weed management, herbicide-crop relationships and herbicide 
development. Introduction to greenhouse and bioassay techniques used in herbicide 
work and to field research techniques supplemented by laboratory and field exer- 
cises. Messrs. Monaco, Schrader 

HS 521 (FS 521) Food Preservation 3 (2-3) F 

(See food science, page 336.) 

HS 541 (GN 541, CS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 3 (3-0) F 

(See crop science, page 290.) 

HS 542 (GN 542, CS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 2 (0-4) Sum. 

(See crop science, page 290.) 

HS 552 Growth of Horticultural Plants 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

An examination of metabolism underlying growth and development of horticul- 
tural plants throughout their life cycles. Biosynthetic pathways which are unique 
to higher plants will receive strong emphasis. The roles of hormones, growth 
regulators, and environmental factors will be considered. Mr. Pharr 

HS 562 (FS 562) Post-Harvest Physiology 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

A study of chemical and physiological changes that occur during handling, trans- 
portation and storage which affect the quality of horticultural crops. Considera- 
tion will be given to pre- and post-harvest conditions which influence these changes. 

Mr. Ballinger 

HS 599 Research Principles Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Investigation of a problem in horticulture under the direction of the instructor. 
The students obtain practice in experimental techniques and procedures, critical 
review of literature and scientific writing. The problem may last one or two sem- 
esters. Credit will be determined by the nature of the problem, not to exceed a total 
of four hours. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

HS 613 (CS 613, GN 613) Plant Breeding Theory 3 (3-0) S 



358 



HS 614 (CS 614, SSC 614) Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils 3 (3-0) F 

HS 621 Methods and Evaluation of Horticultural Research 3 (3-0) F 

HS 622 Mineral Nutrition in Plants 3 (2-3) S 

HS 691 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

HS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

INDUSTRIAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 100 Introduction to Industrial Education 2 (2-0) F 

The place of vocational education in a program of public education and the 

fundamental principles upon which this work is based. Mr. Parker 

ED 305 Analysis of Technical Education Programs and 

Course Construction 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: ED 100, advanced undergraduate standing 

Principles and techniques of selecting and analyzing suitable teaching activities 
and arranging such material into a functional instructional order. Instructional 
units prepared will be based on an analysis of a technical occupation or activity. 
A detailed course of study will be prepared. Mr. Shore 

ED 327 History and Philosophy of Industrial and 

Technical Education 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: ED 100 

Historical study of trade and technical education movement. Place, function and 
changing concepts of industrial and technical education in American education. 
Economic, sociological and psychological aspects. Mr. Nerden 

ED 405 Industrial and Technical Education Shop and 

Laboratory Planning 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, six hours of drawing and design 

Principles and techniques to assist teachers in planning and organizing shop and 
laboratory facilities. Problems of locating and equipping vocational schools; the 
planning and layout of shops and related technology laboratories and classrooms. 
Individual and group assignments on planning and layout of post- secondary 
school buildings. Mr. Shore 

ED 421 Principles and Practices in Industrial Cooperative 

Training 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: ED 327, ED 344 

A study of the developments, objectives and principles of industrial cooperative 
training. The organization, promotion and management of programs in this area of 
vocational education. Mr. Smith 

ED 422 Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects 3, 4 (3-2) F 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 
For majors only. 

A study of effective methods and techniques of teaching industrial subjects. Em- 
phasis is given to class organization; student-teacher planning; methods of teaching 
manipulative skills and related information; lesson planning; shop safety; and 
evaluation. Teaching problems will be studied and analyzed following directed 
observations in the public schools. Staff 

359 



ED 428 Organization of Related Study Materials 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: ED 327, ED 344 

The principles of selecting and organizing both technical and general related 
instructional material for trade extension and industrial cooperative training 
classes. Mr. Smith 

ED 440 Vocational Education 2 (2-0) F 

Prerequisites: ED 444, PSY 304 

A comprehensive study of the types of vocational education of less than college 
grade, provided for through federal legislation; an evaluation of the effectiveness of 
the program; and a detailed study of the North Carolina Plan. Staff 

ED 444 Student Teaching in Industrial Subjects 8 (2-15) F 

Prerequisites: ED 334, PSY 304, senior standing, admission to teacher education 
and an overall 2.0 average 

Students in the industrial arts, vocational industrial education and technical 
education curricula will devote 10 weeks during the fall semester to full-time, off- 
campus student teaching in selected public schools throughout the State. They will 
be assigned to their teaching center in the preceding spring and will report to their 
supervising teachers when the public schools (to which they are assigned) open in 
the fall. During the remainder of the term, additional courses will be taken in 
concentrated form. Staff 

ED 482 Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts 2 (1-2) S 

Prerequisites: PSY 304 or six hours in education 

This course is devoted to planning and organizing learning units in industrial 
arts. Staff 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional Media 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate standing 

Analysis of learning units and the preparation of industrial instructional aids 
and devices. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 516 Community Occupational Surveys 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisites: Six hours education, consent of instructor 

Methods in organizing and conducting local surveys and evaluation of findings 
in planning a program of vocational education. Graduate Staff 

ED 517 Implications for Data Processing in Education 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: CSC 111; ED 529 or consent of instructor 

An intensive study of current attempts to apply new technologies to education. 
Attention will be given to research findings related to Computer Assisted 
Instruction, gamed instructional simulation, approaches to guidance and pre- 
scription learning as well as administrative problems pertaining to student 
scheduling, pupil transportation and data reporting systems. Graduate Staff 

ED 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of determining 
teaching content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial course organiza- 
tion based on occupational analysis covering instruction in skills and technology 
and including course outlines, job sequences, the development of industrial materials 
and instructional schedules. Graduate Staff 



360 



ED 527 Philosophy of Industrial and Technical Education 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: ED 422, ED 440 

A presentation of the historical development of industrial and technical 
education; the types of programs, philosophy, trends and problems of vocational- 
industrial education; study of federal and state legislation pertaining to industrial 
education, practical nurse education and technical education. Mr. Nerden 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor 

This course is designed to guide and assist in the growth patterns of individuals 
who are preparing to be directors, administrators or supervisors of vocational 
education programs at the local, state and/or national levels, with special emphasis 
upon the organization and operation of cooperative occupational programs. The 
course will cover the entire field of cooperative occupational education on secondary, 
post- secondary and adult levels. It will refer to the accepted essentials of cooperative 
education in order that the application of the philosophy to the details of planning, 
organization, establishment, and operation of cooperative occupational programs will 
be practical and meaningful. Included will be student visitations to existing 
quality programs in cooperative occupational education, for the purpose of studying 
on-site conditions related to this specialized area of study. Mr. Smith 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: ED 525 

Selection and organization of curricula used in vocational-industrial and technical 
education; development of curricula and instructional materials. Mr. Hanson 

ED 552 Industrial Arts in the Elementary School 3 (3-0) Sum. 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours in education, consent of instructor 

This course is organized to help elementary teachers and principals understand 
how tools, materials and industrial processes may be used to vitalize and supplement 
the elementary school child's experience. Practical children's projects along with 
the building of classroom equipment. Staff 

ED 555 Comparative Crafts and Industries 6 Sum. 

Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing, consent of instructor 

A travel seminar as a cultural appreciations course involving study of indigenous 
crafts and industries, their materials, processes, products and design in foreign 
countries. Mr. Olson 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Six hours graduate credit, consent of department head 

Directed study to provide individualized study and analysis in specialized areas 
of trade, industrial or technical subjects. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 608 Supervision of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education 3 (3-0) F 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Technical Education Programs 3 (3-0) S 

ED 610 Administration of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

Education 3 (3-0) S 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting 

Vocational Education 3 (3-0) F S 



361 



ED 612 Finance, Accounting and Management of 

Vocational Education Programs 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts 2 (2-0) F S 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts 2(2-0) 

ED 691 Seminar in Industrial Education 1 (1-0) 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education 1 (1-0) F S 

ED 699 Research Credits Arranged 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

IA 100 Introduction to Industrial Arts 1 (1-0) F 

A basic course designed to orient the student to college life and to introduce him 
to the philosophy, objectives and scope of industrial arts as related to teacher 
education and industrial employment. A study of the problems and opportunities in 
the profession. Staff 

IA 102 Fundamentals of Materials and Processes 4 (2-4) F S 

A systematic study of the structure and characteristics of selected materials and 
the processes utilized in shaping, forming, cutting, machining and finishing 
them into products. Attention will be given to the requirements of manufacturing 
of products. Experiences in graphic communication, demonstrations of hand and 
machine tools, and student participation in laboratory problems in the identification 
and testing of materials will be provided. Staff 

IA 103 Drafting I 3 (1-4) S 

Service course for agricultural education. 

Graphical communication encompassing sketching and instrument drawing. 
Theory and practice taught through the medium of freehand sketching involving 
oblique, isometric, perspective, exploded, assembly, sections and orthographic 
projection type drawings. Also included is blackboard sketching. Mr. Troxler 

IA 105 Drafting 4 (2-4) F S 

Prerequisite: IA 102 

This course covers theory and practice in the area of technical communication 
through the sketching and drafting media. The student will get practice in both 
sketching and instrument drawing in the orthographic projection, pictorial 
drawing, sections, revolutions and sheet metal development. Mr. Troxler 

I A 203 Technical Sketching 2 (1-2) S 

The application of drawing practices for the layman. Freehand sketching, pic- 
torial representation, production sketches, template drawing, exploded views, 
shades and shadows. Individual problems and selected graphic representation. 

Mr. Troxler 

IA 205 Industrial Arts Design 3 (1-4) F S 

Prerequisites: IA 100, IA 209, IA 210 

A study of design as related to industry and the industrial arts laboratory. 
Creative design and individual expression through problems involving utilization 
of industrial material for human needs. Mr. Troxler 



362 



IA 209 Wood Processing 4 (2-4) F S 

Prerequisite: I A 102 

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the processes of designing, 
developing and producing wood products through lectures, discussions and planned 
experiences in the various woodworking areas. Emphasis will be on planning and 
developing wood products in the industrial arts laboratory, together with an analy- 
sis of typical products and industrial practices. A research report will be required. 

Staff 

IA 210 Metal Technology 4 (2-4) F S 

Prerequisites: IA 102, I A 105 

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the process of designing, 
developing and producing metal products. Instruction will be given through lec- 
tures, discussions and planned experiences in the basic metal-working areas. Empha- 
sis will be on planning and developing of metal products in the industrial arts 
laboratory, coupled with analysis of typical products and industrial practices. A 
research report will be required. Staff 

IA 230 Drafting II 3 (1-4) S 

Prerequisite: I A 105 

This is a depth course in drawing. The student will have laboratory exercises in 
problem solutions through the drawing method. The skill of application and utiliza- 
tion of drawing as a means of communication will be emphasized. Mr. Troxler 

I A 304 General Shop Organization 2 (1-2) S 

Prerequisites: IA 105, IA 209, IA 210, IA 312 

Application of principles of general shop organization and operation. Analysis 
of products. Methods and techniques of production of laboratory projects including 
a variety of materials suitable to varying educational levels. Mr. Young 

IA 306 Graphic Arts 4 (2-4) S 

Prerequisite: I A 102 

An introduction to the basic printing areas of letterpress, offset, photography, 
silk scree*n and bookbinding with emphasis on course outline and subject matter 
for the secondary schools. Mr. Bame 

IA 312 Electricity-Electronics 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisites: PY 211, PY 212 or consent of instructor 

A study of the principles of electricity and electronics, basic principles; AC and 
DC circuits; electrical machinery; and electronics, including power supplies, ampli- 
fiers, oscillators and tuned circuits. Applications and examples of the common 
experiences which the student encounters such as power and light circuits, motors 
and controls, measuring and servicing instruments, power supplies, amplifiers, 
radios and electronic control circuits. Mr. Young 

IA 315 General Ceramics 3 (1-4) S 

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to work with 
ceramic materials as a medium of expression and to get experience in the basic 
manufacturing processes of the ceramic industry. Emphasis will be given to a 
study of the sources of clay, designing, forming, decorating and firing of ceramic 
products. Mr. Olson 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IA 412 Electrical Practicum 3 (1-4) S 

Prerequisite: I A 312 or equivalent 



363 



A study of design, layout and construction of basic apparatus in the fields of 
electricity and electronics. Special emphasis upon the use of the tools and hardware 
used in the electrical trades. Mr. Young 

IA 465 Independent Study in Industrial Arts Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

A course designed to develop problem-solving ability through research activities 
in industrial arts. Problems in industrial arts curriculum, method and content are 
carefully selected, designs or plans of action are prepared, and final papers are 
presented and defended before a faculty committee. Staff 

I A 480 Modern Industries 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

An overview of the function and organization of modern industry. Principles of 
work simplification, motion economy, processing and scheduling are reviewed. 
The effects of technological change on labor, management, and consumer are con- 
sidered. Attention will be focused on contributions of technology to specific indus- 
trial processes in machining, forming, fabricating in relationship to principles, types 
of equipment and usage areas. Mr. Young 

I A 484 School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection 3 (3-0) F 

The physical planning of school shops and laboratories; selection of tools and 

equipment. Whenever possible, actual contemplated school buildings will be used 

for class work. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IA 510 Design for Industrial Arts Teachers 3 (2-2) Sum. 

Prerequisites: Six hours drawing, I A 205 or equivalent 

A study of new developments in the field of design with emphasis on the relation- 
ship of material and form in the selection and designing of industrial arts projects. 

Graduate Staff 

IA 560 (ED 560) New Developments in Industrial Arts Education 3 (3-0) F S 
Prerequisites: Twelve hours education, teaching experience 

This course is a study of the new developments in industrial arts education. It 
is designed to assist teachers and administrators in developing new concepts and 
new content based on the changes in technology. They will be required to reevaluate 
their programs in the light of these new concepts and the new content. Mr. Olson 

IA 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, consent of instructor 

Courses based on individual problems and designed to give advanced majors in 
industrial arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify their knowledge 
and abilities through investigation and research in the various fields of indus- 
trial arts, such as metals, plastics or ceramics. Graduate Staff 

IA 592 Special Problems in Industrial Arts Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: One term of student teaching or equivalent 

The purpose of these courses is to broaden the subject matter experiences in the 
areas of industrial arts. Problems involving experimentation, investigation and 
research in one or more industrial arts areas will be required. Graduate Staff 

IA 595 (ED 595) Industrial Arts Workshop 3 (3-0) Sum. 

Prerequisite: One or more years of teaching experience 

A course for experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of industrial 

364 



arts. The primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and practices for 
initiating, conducting and evaluating programs in this field. Enrollees will pool 
their knowledge and practical experiences and will do intensive research work on 
individual and group programs. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

I A 645 Technology and Industrial Arts 3 (3-0) F S 

IA 660 (ED 660) Industrial Arts Curriculum 3 (3-0) F S 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

IE 241 Furniture Manufacturing Processes I 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: E 240 

A survey of furniture manuracturing technology. Emphasis is on equipment and 
its relationship to furniture product engineering. Mr. Clark 

IE 301 Engineering Economy 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Not open to students scheduling IE 311. 

Criteria and techniques of engineering economy for management decisions in 
relation to economy of design, economy of selection and economy of operation. Study 
of effects of depreciation policies and machine replacement consideration. Emphasis 
on problem solving and development of detailed project economy studies. Staff 

IE 311 Engineering Project Analysis 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

An introduction to the organizational and production problems of industry with 
emphasis on the development and use of analytical methods for the evaluation of 
engineering alternatures. Mr. Bernhard 

IE 321 Business Data Processing 3 (2-2) F S 

Prerequisite: CSC 111 

The nature, flow, characteristics and handling of business data; classifying, 
sorting and calculating using unit record and simple business machines; collection 
for processing data on digital computers; information storage and retrieval, filing 
systems; computer programming of business problems, report generation, inte- 
gration of data flows. Course will emphasize programming of several small pro- 
jects and one major project on the campus computer equipment. Selection and 
balancing of computer systems. Mr. Llewellyn, Staff 

IE 328 Manufacturing Processes 3 (2-3) F S 

Prerequisite: MAT 201 

The forming, finishing and joining operations used in the manufacture of 
industrial products of metallic and nonmetallic materials are treated. Principles 
and methods of measuring and gaging for quality assurance and for interchange- 
ability in volume production are discussed. Laboratory work deepens the under- 
standing of the lecture material and guides the student toward analytical thinking 
and reporting. Throughout the course the technical, supervisory and economic 
functions of the manufacturing engineer are emphasized. Mr. Kamal 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study 4 (3-3) F S 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

Principles and techniques of motion and time study; detailed study of charting 
operator movements; micromotion study. Predetermined time data and its applica- 






365 



tions; stopwatch time study with emphasis on rating, allowances and standard 
data theory and practice. Mr. Anderson 

IE 338 (PSY 338) Human Factors in Equipment Design 3 (2-2) F S 

Prerequisite: IE 332 or PSY 337 

An introduction to methodology in human factors research, equipment design, 
biomechanics, and accident study. Men's sensory, motor and decision-making 
abilities are related to problems of systems design, operator efficiency, and 
safety as these involve displays, controls, work place layout and environmental 
stressors. Mr. Soliday 

IE 340 Furniture Manufacturing Processes II 4 (2-6) F 

Prerequisites: IE 241, WPS 209 

A survey of furniture manufacturing technology. Emphasis is on sequence of 
operations, production rates and the integration of many types of equipment into a 
manufacturing system. Mr. Prak 

IE 341 Furniture Plant Layout and Design 3 (1-6) S 

Prerequisite: IE 340 

Problems in industrial plant design with special reference to furniture manu- 
facture; building structures, equipment location, space utilization, layout for opera- 
tion and control; allied topics in power utilization, light, heat, ventilation and 
safety. Mr. Prak 

IE 343 Plant Layout and Materials Handling 3 (1-4) F S 

Prerequisites: IE 328, IE 332 

Problems in plant arrangement and layout to obtain most effective utilization of 
men, materials and machines as related to space and costs. Includes consideration 
of heat, light ventilation, organization, control, material flow and handling, 
working conditions, safety and other factors as they affect the most satisfactory 
layout of the plant. Mr. Alvarez 

IE 345 Principles of Upholstering 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisite: IE 241 

Properties of seating equipment: evaluation of these properties. Introduction in 
the technology of flexible foam materials; slab foam; molded foam; stress-strain 
diagrams; compression set; evaluation tests. Properties of coil springs. Properties 
of fibrous filling materials. Upholstering constructions. Testing of upholstered 
furniture. Manufacturing procedures. Cost aspects. Mr. Clark 

IE 346 Furniture Design and Construction 2 (2-0) S 

Prerequisite: IE 241 

Lecture and laboratory work on the design and construction of modern and period 
furniture. The course emphasizes construction features that are economical of labor 
and materials and are adaptable to mass production. The course covers the use of 
new engineering materials and their effect on furniture construction. Mr. Prak 

IE 351 Product and Process Engineering 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: MAT 201 

A study of the selection of materials and processes required in the manufacture 
of component parts and assembled products. Included will be the study of the inter- 
relationship of product design, materials selected and processes employed in manu- 
facturing operations. Project work will include application of basic principles in 
typical manufacturing processes. Capabilities and limitations of typical manu- 
facturing equipment and processes will be stressed. Mr. Harder 

IE 352 Work Analysis and Design 4 (2-6) S 

Prerequisite: A course in mathematical statistics 



366 



A study of the production processes and work methods for the purpose of im- 
proving manpower utilization, reducing human effort and reducing the costs of 
production. This includes techniques successfully applied in industry such as 
operations sequencing, operations analysis, man-machine combination, motion 
economy, predetermined motion standards, time study, elemental standard data, 
production line balancing, manufacturing progress function, lot evaluation, wage 
incentives and administrative functions. Mr. Anderson 

IE 353 Statistical Quality Control 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: A course in mathematical statistics 

An introduction to statistical techniques applied to industrial problems, including 
control of industrial systems, and decision-making under uncertainty. Included will 
be a thorough discussion of control chart techniques applied to the control of 
industrial processes as well as an introduction to the extension of these techniques 
to the control of other industrial systems. Mr. Prak 

IE 354 Human Factors Engineering 3 (2-2) S 

Corequisite: IE 352 

The course is designed for industrial engineering majors. The material covers 
basic anatomy and physiology with emphasis on how to use this knowledge in 
designing equipment; systems analysis from the standpoint of the operator; the 
use of anthropometric data in designing equipment; and design and layout of 
displays, controls and work spaces. Mr. Soliday 

IE 361 Quantitative Methods in Industrial Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

Introduction of the mathematical tools used in the formulation and solution to 
problems arising in industrial engineering. Topics include linear algebra, techniques 
in maxima and minima and the use of Laplace and Z-transforms. Applications of 
these techniques will be stressed. Mr. Magazine 

IE 401 Industrial Engineering Analysis I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: IE 361 or MA 405 

A study of linear programming methods and their applications in industrial 
engineering; the transportation method with applications to scheduling in trans- 
portation and production problems; the simplex method and its application in 
production planning, production scheduling and allied fields; upper bound, integer, 
parametric and primal-dual methods with their typical applications; the inter- 
relationships between linear programming and game theory. Mr. Baker 

IE 402 Industrial Engineering Analysis II 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: IE 401 

An introductory study of several aspects of operations research methods with 
emphasis on their industrial engineering applications; replacement theory, sequenc- 
ing problems, inventory control methods and dynamic programming and their 
applications. Mr. Bennington 

IE 403 Industrial Engineering Analysis III 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: IE 401 

An introductory study of several aspects of operations research methods with 
emphasis on their industrial engineering applications; continuous and discrete 
cybernetics with emphasis on Markov processes; finite and infinite queuing models; 
industrial control methods and industrial dynamics. Mr. Magazine 

IE 408 Production Control 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: IE 361, IE 401 

Forecasting, production planning, models for scheduling and sequencing, inven- 



367 



tory models and operational systems, as well as the reporting and evaluation 
functions necessary for the design and control of a production system will be dis- 
cussed. Application of quantitative methods to these areas of applications will be 
emphasized. Mr - Bennington 

IE 420 Manufacturing Controls 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: IE 301 

Theory and methodology for developing and maintaining profitable manufacturing 
operations. Development of principles and procedures for control of materials, man- 
power and costs. Special attention to production and inventory control, equipment 
utilization, wage classification and cost reduction programs. Mr. Tucker 

IE 421 Data Processing and Production Control Systems 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: CSC 111, IE 352 

This course is an introduction to the design of integrated control systems 
necessary for effective management of production. It will include the methods of 
systems design, the basic concepts of computer processing systems, the design of 
control procedures and reports, and their application to mechanized and electronic 
data processing equipment. Major emphasis will be placed on the design of control 
procedures for production scheduling, labor performance, quality control. Systems 
flow charts, block diagrams and program statements in compiler form will be 
used for each system application. Mr. Llewellyn 

IE 432 Standard Data 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: IE 332 

Theory and practice in developing standard data from measured and predeter- 
mined time data; methods of analysis and synthesis; applications of standard data 
in production planning and scheduling; wage incentive plans. Mr. Kamal 

IE 440 Furniture Management Analysis 3 (1-4) F 

Prerequisite: IE 341 

A course in economic decision making applied to the furniture industry. The 
selection of equipment, materials, methods and strategy, from several feasible 
alternatives is studied with the aid of actual case histories. Mr. Prak 

IE 443 Quality Control 3 (2-2) F S 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

Economic balance between cost of quality and value of quality, and techniques 
for accomplishing this balance. Organization for, specification and utilization of 
quality controls. Statistical theory and analyses as applied to sampling, control 
charts, tolerance determination, acceptance procedures and control of production. 

Mr. Anderson 

IE 453 Operations Planning and Plant Layout 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: IE 352 

This course will provide an opportunity for the student to apply the basic prin- 
ciples contained in the prerequisite courses to the design of plantwide production 
programs with emphasis placed on planning, arrangement layout and implementa- 
tion of such programs. It will include operations sequencing, tooling and equipment 
selection, materials handling, systems design, manpower and facilities forecasting. 
Suitable cases will be drawn from both mass production and jobbing operations. 

Mr. Alvarez 

IE 495 Project Work in Industrial Engineering 2-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Special investigations and research related to furniture construction and process- 
ing, and other assigned problems. Staff 



368 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IE 505 (MA 505, OR 505) Mathematical Programming I 3 (3-0) F Sum. 

Prerequisite: MA 405 

A study of mathematical methods applied to problems of planning. Linear 
programming will be covered in detail. This course is intended for those who desire 
to study this subject in depth and detail. It provides a rigorous and complete 
development of the theoretical and computational aspects of this technique as well 
as a discussion of a number of applications. Graduate Staff 

IE 509 (OR 509) Dynamic Programming 3 (3-0) S Sum. 

Prerequisites: MA 405, ST 421 

An introduction to the theory and computational aspects of dynamic program- 
ming and its application to sequential decision problems 

Messrs. Elmaghraby, Nuttle 

IE 511 Advanced Engineering Project Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: IE 311, ST 421 

Analysis of project economy models with certainty assumed; advantages and 
limitations of models, effects of income tax and depreciation methods. Risk 
analyses employing probability concepts; sensitivity studies and measure of 
utility. Estimation techniques and use of accounting information, time series 
analysis and judgment factors. Planning and uses of capital funds. Mr. Bernhard 

IE 515 Process Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: IE 328, IE 443 

The technical processes of translating product design into a manufacturing pro- 
gram. The application of industrial engineering in the layout, tooling, methods, 
standards, costs and control functions of manufacturing. Laboratory problems 
covering producer and consumer products. Mr. Harder 

IE 517 Automatic Processes 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: IE 328, IE 443 

Principles and methods for automatic processing. The design of product, process 
and controls. Economic, physical and sociological effects of automation. 

Mr. Harder 

IE 521 Control Systems and Data Processing 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: IE 421 

This course is designed to train the student in the problems and techniques 
required for systematic control of the production process and the business enter- 
prise. This includes training in the determination of control factors, the collection 
and recording of data, and the processing, evaluation and use of data. The course 
will illustrate the applications and use of data processing equipment and information 
machines in industrial processes. Case problems will be used extensively. 

Mr. Llewellyn 

IE 522 (OR 522) Dynamics of Industrial Systems 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: IE 421 

A study of the dynamic properties of industrial systems; introduction of servo- 
mechanism theory as applied to company operations. Simulation of large nonlinear, 
multiloop, stochastic systems on a digital computer; methods of determining 
modifications in systems design and/or operating parameters for improved system 
behavior. Mr. Llewellyn 

IE 523 Inventory Control Methods I 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: OR 501, ST 421, or ST 515 

369 



A study of inventory policy with respect to reorder sizes, minimum points and 
production schedules. Simple inventory models, models with restrictions, price 
breaks, price changes, analysis of slow-moving inventories. Introduction to the 
smoothing problem in continuous manufacturing. Applications of linear and 
dynamic programming. Mr. Alvarez 

IE 540 (PSY 540) Human Factors in Systems Design 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: ST 513 or ST 515, IE 338 (PSY 338), IE 441 or consent of instructor 

Introduction to problems of the systems development cycle, including man- 
machine function allocation, military specifications, display- control compatibility, 
the personnel subsystem concept and maintainability design. Detailed treatment is 
given to man as an information processing mechanism. Mr. Pearson 

IE 541 Research Methods in Accident Study 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisites: IE 338 (PSY 338), ST 421 

Consideration of the methods used in accident-injury study, including field 
investigation, experimental engineering and biomedical research, statistical 
studies, and computer simulation. (Offered in alternate years.) Mr. Ayoub 

IE 542 Physiological Criteria in Work Measurement 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

The course first provides the student with a background of physiological knowl- 
edge appropriate to the study of men at work. It then covers application of this 
knowledge of the study of equipment design and its use. Mr. Soliday 

IE 546 Advanced Quality Control 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: IE 353, ST 421 

The statistical foundations of quality control are emphasized in this course as 
well as its economic implications. Mathematical derivations of most of the formulae 
used are given. Sampling techniques are treated extensively and many applications 
of this powerful technique are explained. Graduate Staff 

IE 547 Engineering Reliability 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: IE 353, ST 421 

The methodology of reliability including application of discrete and continuous 
distribution models and statistical designs; reliability estimation, reliability 
structure models, reliability demonstration and decisions, and reliability growth 
models. Examples of reliability evaluation and demonstration programs. 

Graduate Staff 

IE 561 (OR 561) Queues and Stochastic Service Systems 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 421 

General concepts of stochastic processes are introduced. Poisson processes, 
Markov processes and renewal theory are presented. These are then used in the 
analysis of queues, starting with a completely memoryless queue to one with 
general parameters. Applications to many engineering problems will be considered. 

Mr. Magazine 

IE 586 (OR 586) Network Flows 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: IE 505 (MA 505, OR 505) or equivalent 

This course will study problems of flows in networks. These problems will include 
the determination of the shortest chain, maximal flow and minimal cost flow in 
networks. The relationship between network flows and linear programming will be 
developed as well as problems with nonlinear cost functions, multi-commodity flows 
and the problem of network synthesis. (Offered in alternate years.) 

Mr. Bennington 



370 



IE 591 Project Work 2-6 F S 
Prerequisite: Graduate or senior standing 

Investigation and report on an assigned problem for students enrolled in the 

fifth-year curriculum in industrial engineering. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

IE 608 Linear Programming Applications 3 (3-0) S 

IE 611 The Design of Production Systems 3 (3-0) F 

(Alternate years.) 

IE 622 Inventory Control Methods II 3 (3-0) F 

IE 640 (PSY 640) Skilled Operator Performance 3 (3-0) S 

IE 641 Environmental Factors and Human Performance 3 (3-0) S 

IE 651 Special Studies in Industrial Engineering Credits Arranged 

IE 692 (MA 692, OR 692) Special Topics in Mathematical 

Programming 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

IE 693 Seminar in Systems Safety Engineering 1 (1-0) S 

IE 694 Advanced Problems in Human Factors Engineering 3 (3-0) S 

IE 695 Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

IE 699 Industrial Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ORIENTATION 

ISO 100 International Student Orientation 1 (1-0) F S 

An orientation course required of all foreign students, new to the United States, 
which serves to acquaint them with the Raleigh community, American culture, 
University academic procedures and U.S. Government regulations. Undergrad- 
uates should enroll for credit and graduates for audit. Mr. Weaver 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

LAR 211 Introduction to Landscape Architecture 3 (3-0) F S 

A survey course of the profession of landscape architecture for majors in the 
related fields of recreation resources administration, civil engineering, forestry 
and horticultural sciences, including the function, responsibilities and training of 
the landscape architect; the design process (criteria, approaches, sequence); office 
procedures and practices; formulation, presentation and interpretation of 
contract documents; and the relationships of landscape architecture to related 
fields. Staff 

LAR 312 Site Planning 3 (1-6) S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

The course is an introduction into the problems of small scale design and techni- 
cal operations such as grading, alignment, controls will be covered. Staff 



371 



LAR 321, 322 Landscape Materials I, II 3 (1-4) F S 

Prerequisite: Science electives 

A professional option for those students wishing to concentrate on small scale 
physical design. The course will cover identification and properties of materials. 
Exercises in design will stress implementation and use of materials for particular 
situations. Staff 

LAR 400 Intermediate Landscape Architecture Design (Series) 4 (1-9) F S 
Prerequisite: DN 202 or equivalent or consent of department 

The LAR 400 Series is intended to permit students a flexibility in scheduling. 
The courses will cover small scale design, urban landscape architecture, public 
and institutional design. Each course will be conducted as a workshop/studio to 
study the problems of project organization, design and execution. The course may be 
scheduled four times. Staff 

LAR 411, 412 Landscape Technology 3 (1-6) F S 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Techniques and procedures of construction drawing. Contracts, specifications and 
office practices. Consolidation of previous technical course work by case study 
projects of various scales. Staff 

LAR 491 Special Projects in Landscape Architecture 2-4 F S 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and 3.0 G.P.A. 

The course is intended as a special projects framework for advanced undergrad- 
uates to do research on a tutorial basis. The course may be scheduled two times. 

Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

LAR 501, 502 Landscape Design I, II 6 (3-9) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Regional research and analysis. Social criteria of urban and regional design. 
Transportation systems, land use determination and the design of large scale en- 
vironmental complexes. Open to graduate students in related fields. Evaluation 
of nonmajors based on contribution of their discipline to group effort. (Not avail- 
able after spring 1973.) Staff 

LAE 503 Regional Design Workshop I 3 (0-9) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Study of current literature in regional design and planning with emphasis on 
extracting a number of premises, theoretical structures and information handling 
techniques as a basis for seminar discussions and activities. Staff 

LAR 504 Regional Design Workshop II 3 (0-9) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Case study projects designed to explore the relationship between the resource 
base and the development intentions with the purpose of evolving clear statements 
or problems involved and their susceptibility to solution problem situations will 
be developed from differing viewpoints and levels of complexity. Staff 

LAR 512 Physical Systems 3 (2-2) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Analysis of physical systems and methods of determining relationships between 
systems with particular reference to natural systems, managed resource systems, 
development systems and their relationship to development objectives. Staff 



372 



LAR 521 Introduction to Regional Design 3 (2-2) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

A perspective of the measures man has taken to ensure his relation to the 
general environment. Ecologic determinism, economic and political functionalism 
and aesthetic movements will be developed in an historical context. Staff 

LAR 591, 592 Special Projects 4 (2-6) F S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Student-evolved projects with emphasis on utilization and expansion of technical 
processes and techniques to reinforce design solutions. Introduction and investiga- 
tion of experimental methodology. Development of student-evolved interest in 
specific areas. Open to graduate students in related fields. Evaluation of nonmajors 
based on contribution of their discipline to group effort. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

LAR 603 Regional Design III 3 (0-9) F 

LAR 604 Regional Design IV 3-6 S 

LAR 611 Physical Design Policy 3 (2-2) F S 

LAR 691 Degree Seminar 

MARINE SCIENCES 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAS 200 (OY 200) Introduction to the Marine Environment 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: High school physics, chemistry, algebra, trigonometry and biology or 
equivalent 

A descriptive account of the ocean as a part of our environment; subjects covered 
include interactions between atmosphere and ocean, ocean circulation, physical 
and chemical properties of sea water, marine geology and marine biology. 

MAS 471 (MAE 471) Undersea Vehicle Design 3 (3-0) F S 

(See mechanical and aerospace engineering, page 392.) 

MAS 487 (CE 487, OY 487) Physical Oceanography 3 (3-0) S 

(See physical oceanography, page 420.) 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAS 529 (ZO 529) Biological Oceanography 3 (3-0) S 

(See zoology, page 483.) 

MAS 541 (OY 541, CE 541) Gravity Wave Theory I 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EM 303 or PY 411 

Classical gravity wave theory with emphasis on the basic mechanics of wave 
motions, mass transport induced by waves and various conservation laws with 
their applications in wave study. 

MAS 551 (OY 551) Ocean Circulation 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: EM 303 or PY 411 



373 



Basic study of the mechanics of ocean circulation with emphasis on various 
simple models of circulation systems. 

MAS 581 (CE 581) Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

(See civil engineering, page 283.) 

MAS 584 (GY 584) Marine Geology 3 (3-0) S 

(See geology, page 346.) 

MAS 591, 592 Marine Sciences Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 

A seminar designed to give perspective in the field of oceanology; topics vary 
from semester to semester. In order to obtain credit a student must deliver a 
seminar. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAS 601 (OY 601) Advanced Physical Oceanography I 3 (3-0) F 

MAS 602 (OY 602) Advanced Physical Oceanography II 3 (3-0) S 

MAS 605 (OY 605, EM 605) Advanced Geophysical Fluid 

Mechanics I 3 (3-0) F 

MAS 606 (OY 606 EM 606) Advanced Geophysical Fluid 

Mechanics II 3 (3-0) S 

MAS 613 (OY 613, EM 613) Perturbation Method in Fluid 

Mechanics I 3 (3-0) F 

MAS 614 (OY 614, EM 614) Perturbation Method in Fluid 

Mechanics II 3 (3-0) S 

MAS 693 Special Topics in Marine Sciences 1-3 

MATERIALS ENGINEERING 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

MAT 200 Mechanical Properties of Structural Materials 2 (1-3) 

Prerequisites: CH 105 and the first course in engineering mechanics 

The dependence of mechanical properties of structural materials on macro-, 
micro- and crystalline structure; control of structure through treatment. 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials I 3(2-3) 

Prerequisite: CH 105 

An introduction to the fundamental physical principles governing the structure 
and constitution of metallic and nonmetallic materials of construction, and the 
relation of these principles to the control of properties. 

MAT 301 Equilibrium and Rate Processes in Materials Science 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: CH 331 or equivalent 

Application of thermodynamic and kinetic principles to engineering materials in 
the liquid and solid states. 

MAT 310 Physical Examination of Materials 3 (1-6) 

Prerequisite: MAT 201 

Experiments designed to demonstrate basic techniques in crystallography. X-ray 
diffraction, optical and electron microscopy. 

374 



MAT 311 Ceramic Processing I 4 (3-3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 201 

A detailed study covering the basic chemical and physical laws underlying the 
processes and behavior of diverse ceramic compositions in the sequential manu- 
facturing operations required to produce ceramic materials with controlled pro- 
perties. Included are such topics as size reduction, separation and analysis; 
particle packing, mixing, agglomeration, surface chemistry, rheology of liquid- 
solid and solid-polymer systems; and behavior of ceramics in a wide variety of 
forming processes. 

MAT 312 Ceramic Processing II 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: MAT 311 

Basic principles underlying the thermal processing of ceramics are covered. Ap- 
propriate subject material in basic and engineering sciences are included. Particular 
reference is made to obtaining desired microstructures. Included are such topics as 
fuels; combustion and heat sources; heat transfer and heat utilization; gas and 
liguid flow relation; psychrometry and drying; high temperature processing such 
as calcining; sintering in the presence and absence of liquid phases, melting and 
hot forming; and supplementary finishing processes after firing of the ceramic. 

MAT 401 Materials Processing 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: MAT 301, MAT 450, MAT 412 

Techniques for the processing of ceramic, metallic, and polymeric materials 
to control properties, form, and appearance through considerations of thermal, 
chemical, mechanical, electrical, magnetic and nuclear energy. Both traditional 
and exotic processes are covered utilizing fundamental materials science and 
engineering science principles. 

MAT 411, 412 Physical Principles in Materials Science I, II 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: (411) MAT 201; (412) MAT 411 

Introduction to the fundamental physical concepts of ceramic, metallic and 
polymeric materials. Relation between properties and structure. 

MAT 417 Ceramic Subsystem Design 3 (2-3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 312 

Individual and team study involving the interdependence of plant layout, pro- 
cesses, equipment and materials in the economic design of engineering systems and 
subsystems. Discussion of design principles, sources of data, creativity and 
economic analysis to encourage original solutions to problems of current and 
future need and interest in the ceramic profession. 

MAT 423, 424 Materials Factors in Design I, II 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: (423) MAT 450; (424) MAT 423 
Corequisite: (423) MAT 431 

Selection of materials for specific engineering applications. Manufacturing pro- 
cesses and their relation to product use. 

MAT 431, 432 Physical Metallurgy I, II 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: (431) MAT 412; (432) MAT 431 

Alloy design; control of properties through microstructures; principles of heat 
treatment; strengthening mechanisms. 

MAT 435, 436 Physical Ceramics I, II (435) 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: (435) MAT 412; (436) MAT 435 (436) 3 (2-3) 

A project-oriented course in which starting materials of various types of 

ceramic products are characterized including analysis of reactions, selection of pro- 



375 



cessing parameters, processing, measurement and properties appropriate to the 
ceramic analysis; and correlation of all materials and processing parameters with 
properties and microstructures. Projects are selected to exemplify characteristic 
types of ceramics. 

MAT 437 Introduction to the Vitreous State 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: MAT 301 

An introductory study of the vitreous state to include the structure, properties 
and type of glasses (including glazes and enamels). Opacity color and devitri- 
fication. Nature of the glassy phase in kiln-fired ceramics. 

MAT 450 Mechanical Properties of Materials 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisites: MAT 201 and EM 205 

Elastic, plastic, and fracture phenomena in solids including yielding, strain 
hardening, brittle fracture, creep and fatique. 

MAT 491 Materials Engineering Seminar 1 (1-0) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Literature survey of selected topics in materials engineering. Oral and writ- 
ten reports and discussions. 

MAT 493, 494 Ceramic Field Exercises I, II 1 (0-3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Selected plant visitations, lectures by practicing ceramic engineers, reports on 
industrial organizations engaged in manufacture or use of ceramics. Discussions of 
professional organizations and professional ethics. 

MAT 495, 496 Experimental Engineering I, II 3 (1-6) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific project dealing with 
metallurgy, materials or general experimental work. A seminar period is provided 
and a written report required. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAT 500 Modern Concepts in Materials Science 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MAT 412 

Applications of current theories of materials such as crystal theory, continuum 
and quasi-continuum theories, phenomenological theories, etc., to the solution of 
materials problems. 

MAT 503 Ceramic Microscopy 3 (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: GY 331 

Transmitted and reflected light techniques for the systematic study of ceramic 
materials and products. 

MAT 509 High Vacuum Technology 3 (2-3) Sum. 

Prerequisite: CH 433 or MAE 301 

Properties of low-pressure gases and vapors. Production, maintenance and 
measurement of high vacuum; design, construction and operation of high vacuum 
high temperature facilities. Properties and reactions of materials which are pro- 
cessed, tested and/or utilized in high vacuum environments. 

MAT 510 Structure of Crystalline Materials 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MAT 411 
Corequisite: MAT 500 



376 



The lattice structure of crystals, including group theory applications, reciprocal 
lattice concept and the study of crystal structure as related to bonding. 

MAT 520 Theory and Structure of Materials 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MAT 510 

Structure of liquids, and crystalline and amorphous solids used in engineering 
systems. Crystallinity and thermal properties. Ionic crystals in ceramic systems. 
The metallic state and alloy behavior. Emphasis is placed on the relation between 
fundamental materials parameters and engineering properties. 

MAT 527 Refractories in Service 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MAT 411 

A study of the physical and chemical properties of the more important refrac- 
tories in respect to their environment in industrial and laboratory furnaces. 

MAT 529 Properties of High Temperature Materials 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MAT 201 

Effects of temperature on the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of 
inorganic materials; relationships between microstructure and high temperature 
properties; applications of ceramics, metals and composites at elevated temperatures. 

MAT 530 Phase Transformation in Materials I 3 (3-0) F 

Corequisite: MAT 500 

Kinetic theory of transformations, nucleation theory, homogenous and hetero- 
geneous mucleation, growth of crystals, epitaxial thin films. 

MAT 533, 534 Advanced Ceramic Engineering Design I, II 3 (2-3) F S 

Prerequisite: MAT 417 

Advanced studies in analysis and design of ceramic products, processes and 
systems leading to original solutions of current industrial problems and the devel- 
opment of new concepts of manufacturing. 

MAT 540 Glass Technology 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MAT 437 

Fundamentals of glass manufacture including compositions, properties and 
application of the principal types of commercial glasses. 

MAT 541, 542 Principles of Corrosion I, II 3 (2-3) F S 

Prerequisite: MAT 431 or CH 431 

The fundamentals of metallic corrosion and passivity. The electro-chemical 
nature of corrosive attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, methods 
of corrosion protection. Laboratory work included. 

MAT 550 Dislocation Theory 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MAT 450 

Structure, energetics, stress and strain fields, interactions and motion of dis- 
locations in solids. 

MAT 556 Composite Materials 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MAT 450 

Basic principles underlying the properties of composite materials as related to 
properties of the individual constituents and their interaction. Emphasis is placed 
on the design of composite systems to yield desired combinations of properties. 

MAT 562 (NE 562) Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering 3 (3-0) F 
Prerequisite: PY 410 or consent of instructor 



377 



Reactor component design considerations determined by materials properties 
as well as by nuclear function are covered. Emphasis is placed on radiation 
effects and other concepts pertinent to the selection of materials for nuclear 
reactors for either terrestrial or space applications. 

MAT 573 (NE 573) Computer Experiments in Materials 

Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: PY 407, MA 301 

The basic techniques for constructing both statistical (Monte Carlo) and deter- 
ministic computer experiments will be explained and discussed from the stand- 
point of immediate use in the solution of current engineering research and develop- 
ment problems. 

MAT 595, 596 Advanced Materials Experiments I, II 3 (1-6) F S 

Prerequisite: MAT 411 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific experimental project 
dealing with materials. A seminar period is provided and a written report is 
required. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAT 601 Ceramic Phase Relationships 3 (3-0) S 

MAT 603 Advanced Ceramic Reaction Kinetics 3 (3-0) S 

MAT 610 X-ray Diffraction 3 (3-0) F 

MAT 615 Electron Microscopy 3 (3-0) F 

MAT 621 Theory and Structure of Amorphous Materials 3 (3-0) S 

MAT 622 Theory and Structure of Ceramic Materials 3 (3-0) F 

MAT 623 Theory and Structure of Metallic Materials 3 (3-0) F 

MAT 630 Phase Transformation in Materials II 3 (3-0) F 

MAT 631, 632 Advanced Physical Ceramics I, II 3 (2-3) F S 

MAT 633 Advanced Mechanical Properties of Materials 3 (3-0) F 

MAT 661 Diffraction Theory 3 (3-0) F 

MAT 691, 692 Special Topics in Materials Engineering 3 (3-0) F S 

MAT 695 Materials Engineering Seminar 1 (1-0) F S 
MAT 699 Materials Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

MATHEMATICS 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 (3-2) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 
Credit in both MA 102 and MA 112 is not allowed. 

The first of three semesters of a unified course in analytic geometry and calculus. 
Functions and graphs, limits, derivatives of algebraic functions and applications, 

378 



indefinite integral, definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas 
and volumes, plane analytic geometry. 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 (3-2) F S 

Sets, and logic, the real number system, polynomials, algebraic fractions, exponents 
and radicals, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, functions and relations, 
logarithms, plane trigonometry. (Students in the Schools of Engineering, Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences, Design and Departments of Agricultural Engineering 
and Mathematics Education who may be required to take this course will not 
receive credit hours for MA 111 toward the graduation requirements). 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 (4-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 111 

Credit in both MA 102 and MA 112 is not allowed. 

Limits and derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications, logarithmic 
and exponential functions, higher derivatives, definite integral, applications, inte- 
gration techniques, multivariate calculus, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, 
examples and applications in biological and behavorial sciences. 

MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 

Addition and multiplication of matrices, linear equations, linear dependence 
and vector space, linear inequalities and linear programming, binary relations, 
eigenvalues, quadratic forms, finite Markov chains, examples and applications in 
biological and behavioral sciences. 

MA 115 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics I 3 (3-0) F S 

Credit in MA 115 is not allowed if the student already has credit in MA 102, MA 112 
or MA 114. 

The number system and other scales of notation; algebraic operations, inequalities; 
sets, logic and Boolean algebra; logarithmic and trigonometric functions. The point 
of view is intuitive. Some emphasis is placed on the history of certain mathematical 
concepts and on the importance of mathematics in contemporary life. 

MA 116 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 115 

Credit in MA 116 is not allowed if student already has credit in MA 201, MA 112 or 
MA 114. 

Permutations, combinations and the binomial theorem; probability; mathematical 
induction, the group as an example of a finite mathematical system; graphs of 
systems of linear inequalities and linear programming; solutions of linear systems 
by Cramer's rule and by matrix methods; introduction to analytic geometry and 
calculus. 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance and Elementary Statistics 4 (3-2) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or MA 115 

Simple and compound interest, annuities and their application to amortization 
and sinking fund problems, installment buying, calculation of premiums of life 
annuities and life insurance, elementary statistics. 

MA 127 Recreational Mathematics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or MA 115 

Covers traditional subject matter of recreational mathematics with an eye to 
introducing mathematical concepts. Requires only algebra and trigonometry, but 
student must be willing to engage in new types of mathematical thought. Topics 
include games and puzzles, problems, tricks, geometric figures, model building, 
fallacies, paradoxes, curiosities, anecdotes, conjectures, famous problems, mathemat- 



379 



ical humor, and more. Mathematical treatments will involve number theory, set 
theory, algebra, topology, cominatorics, geometry, probability, analysis, computer 
science and math history. 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 (4-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 102 

The second of three semesters of a unified course in analytic geometry and calculus. 
Applications of the definite integral. Transcendental functions, methods of integra- 
tion, polar coordinates, parametric equations, introduction to infinite series. 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 (4-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

The third of three semesters of a unified course in analytic geometry and calculus. 
Brief introduction to determinants and matrices, vector functions, analytic geometry 
of three dimensions and partial differentiation, multiple integration, applications. 
Line integral and Green's Theorem. 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 112 

Sequences, series, Taylor's Theorem, trigonometric functions, difference equations, 
differential equations, examples and applications in biological and behavioral 
sciences. 

MA 214 Elementary Probability 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 112 or MA 102 

Basic concepts, elementary counting procedures, conditional probability, discrete 
random variables, infinite sample spaces, continuous random variables, continuous 
time stochastic processes, examples and applications in biological and behavioral 
sciences. 

MA 231 Introduction to Linear Algebra 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations, linear equations, determinants, 
eigenvalues and quadratic forms. 

MA 232 Introduction to Multivariable Calculus 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 231 

Functions of several variables, limits, continuity, differentiability, chain rule, 
implicit functions, multiple integrals. 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or equivalent 

First order equations, applications, linear equations of higher order, applications 
to mechanical and electrical systems, series solutions, special functions, Laplace 
transforms. 

MA 312 Introduction to Differential Equations 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 231, MA 201 

First order differential equations, basic theory and application of linear equations. 
Systems of linear equations, matrix methods, series solutions, Laplace transforms, 
existence and uniqueness. 

MA 381 Special Topics 1-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

This course will be used to develop unusual or new mathematics courses for the 
needs of students in any curriculum. 



380 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 

The wave, heat and Laplace equations. Solutions by separation of variables and 
expansion in Fourier Series or other appropriate orthogonal sets. 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

Sets and mappings; equivalence relations; groups, homomorphisms, cosets, 
Cayley's theorem, symmetric groups, quotient groups, rings, integral domains; 
Euclidean algorithm, polynomial rings, ideals, quotient rings. 

MA 404 Affine and Projective Geometries 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: MA 231 and MA 403 

An introduction tq the geometry of euclideon, affine and projective spaces with 
special emphasis on the important groups of symmetries of these spaces. 

MA 405 Introduction to Matrices and Linear Transformations 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

Determinants, linear equations, linear transformations and matrices, operations 
with matrices, eigenvalues, introduction to bilinear and quadratic forms. 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean Geometry 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 403 

A critique of Euclid's Elements, incidence and order properties, congruence of 
triangles, absolute and non-Euclidean geometry, the parallel postulate, real numbers 
and geometry. 

MA 410 Theory of Numbers 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

This course is concerned with the investigation of the arithmetic properties of the 
integers. Topics include congruences, arithmetic functions, quadratic residues, the 
quadratic reciprocity Law of Gauss, primitive roots, diophantine equations, and 
algebraic number fields. 

MA 421 Introduction to Probability 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

Axioms of probability, conditional probability, combinatorial analysis, random 
variables, expectation, simple stochastic processes. 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 232 

Real number system, functions and limits, topology on the real line, continuity, 
differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. 

MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 425 

Infinite series, uniform convergence, calculus of several variables, topology in 
n-dimensions, limits, continuity, differentiability, implicit functions, multiple inte- 
grals, line and surface integrals. 

MA 430 Introduction to Applied Mathematics 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MA 426, MA 421, or MA 214 

Formulation of scientific problems in mathematics terms, interpretation and 
evaluation of the solutions. Topics discussed will be chosen from problems in mana- 



381 



gerial, behavior and life sciences as well as the physical sciences. 

MA 433 History of Mathematics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

Evolution of the number system, trends in the development of modern mathematics; 
lives and contributions of outstanding mathematicians. 

MA 491 Reading in Honors Mathematics 2-6 F S 

Prerequisites: Membership in honors program, consent of department 

MA 493 Special Topics in Mathematics 1-6 F S 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 504 (NE 504) Mathematical Methods in Engineering 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 

Survey of mathematical methods for engineers. Topics include ordinary differential 
equation matrices, partial differential equations, difference equations, numerical 
methods, elements of statistics. Techniques and applications to engineering are 
stressed. This course cannot be taken for credit by mathematics majors. 

MA 505 (IE 505, OR 505) Mathematical Programming I 3 (3-0) F Sum. 

(See industrial engineering, page 369.) 

MA 511 Advanced Calculus I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 

Fundamental theorem on continuous functions; convergence theory of sequences, 
series and integrals; the Riemann integral. 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 

General theorems of partial differentiation; implicit function theorems; vector 
calculus in 3-space; line and surface integrals; classical integral theorems. 

MA 513 Introduction to Complex Variables 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 511 or MA 425 

Operations with complex numbers, derivatives, analytic functions, integrals, 
definitions and properties of elementary functions, multivalued functions, power 
series, residue theory and applications, conformal mapping. 

MA 514 Methods of Applied Mathematics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 511 or MA 425 

Introduction to integral equations, the calculus of variations and difference 
equations. 

MA 515 Linear Functional Analysis I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 426 

Metric spaces, Lebesgue measure and integration; L and 1 spaces; Reisz- 
Fischer and Reisz representation theorems; normed linear spaces and Hilbert 
spaces. 

MA 516 Linear Functional Analysis II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 515 

Basic theorems in Banach spaces, dual spaces, weak topologies; basic theorems 
in Hilbert spaces, and detailed theory of linear operators on Hilbert spaces; spectral 
theorem for self-adjoint completely continuous linear operators. 

382 



MA 517 Introduction to Topology 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 426 

Sets and functions, metric spaces, topological spaces, compactness, separation, 
connectedness. 

MA 518 Calculus on Manifolds 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 426 

Calculus of several variables from a modern viewpoint. Differential and integral 
calculus of several variables, vector functions, integration on manifolds, Stoke's and 
Green's theorems, vector analysis. 

MA 520 Linear Algebra 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 231 or MA 405 

Vector spaces, linear mappings and matrices, determinants, inner product spaces, 
bilinear and quadratic forms, canonical forms, spectral theorem. 

MA 521 Fundamentals of Modern Algebra 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 403 

Groups, normal subgroups, quotient groups, Cayley's theorem, Sylow's theorem. 
Rings, ideals and quotient rings, polynomial rings. Fields, extension fields, elements 
of Galois theory. 

MA 523 Topics in Applied Mathematics 3 (3-0) F 

Corequisites: MA 515, MA 520 

Formulation of scientific problems in mathematical terms, interpretation and 
evaluation of the mathematical analysis of the resulting models. The course will 
discuss problems in behavioral and biological sciences as well as problems in 
mechanics of discrete and continuous systems. Some discussion of optimization and 
the calculus of variations. 

MA 524 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MA 405, MA 512 

Green's functions and two point boundary value problems; elementary theory of 
distributions; generalized Green's functions. Finite and infinite dimensional inner 
product spaces; Hilbert spaces; completely continuous operatoi-s; integral equa- 
tions, the Fredholm alternative; eigenfunction expansions; applications to potential 
theory. Nonsingular and singular Sturm- Liouville problems; Weil's theorem. 

MA 525 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 524 

Distribution theory in n-space; Fourier transforms; partial differential equations, 
generalized solutions, fundamental solutions, Cauchy problem, wave and heat 
equations, well-set problems, Laplace's equation, the Dirichlet and Neumann 
problems, integral equations of potential theory, Green's functions, eigenfunction 
expansions. 

MA 527 (CSC 527) Numerical Analysis I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: CSC 101 or CSC 111, MA 301 or MA 312 and MA 231 or MA 405 

Theory of interpolation, numerical integration, iterative solution of nonlinear 
equations, numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, matrix inversion 
and solution of simultaneous linear equations. 

MA 528 (CSC 528) Numerical Analysis II 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MA 527 

Least squares data approximation, expansions in terms of orthogonal functions, 
Gaussian quadrature, economization of series, minimax approximations, Pade 
approximations, eigenvalues of matrices. 

383 



MA 532 Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: MA 301 or MA 312, MA 405, advanced calculus 

Existence and uniqueness theorems, systems of linear equations, fundamental 
matrices, matrix exponential, series solutions, regular singular points; plane 
autonomous systems, stability theory. 

MA 536 Logic for Digital Computers 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 405 

Introduction to symbolic logic and Boolean algebra, finite state-valued calculus 
and its application to combinational networks; sequential finite-state machines and 
their mathematical formulation; analysis and synthesis problems of sequential 
machines. 

MA 537 Mathematical Theory of Digital Computers 3 (3-0) S 

The sequential machine and its characteristic semi-group; micro-programmed 
computers; general purpose computers and special purpose computers; Turning 
machine and infinite-state machines; nondeterministic switching system and prob- 
abilistic automata. 

MA 541 (ST 541) Theory of Probability I 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MA 425 or MA 511 

Axioms, conbinatorial analysis, conditional probability, independence, random 
variables, expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, probability 
and moment generating functions, central limit theorem, laws of large numbers, 
branching processes, recurrent events, random walk. 

MA 542 (ST 542) Theory of Probability II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: MA 405, MA 541 

Markov chains and Markov processes, Poisson process, birth and death processes, 
queueing theory, renewal theory, stationary processes, Brownian motion. 

MA 545 Set Theory and Foundations of Mathematics 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MA 403 

Logic and the axiomatic approach, the Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms and other 
systems, algebra of sets and order relations, equivalents of the Axiom of Choice, one- 
to-one correspondences, cardinal and ordinal numbers, The Continuum Hypothesis. 

MA 555 (PY 555) Mathematical Introduction to 

Celestial Mechanics 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: One year of advanced calculus 

Central orbits, N-body problems, 3-body problems, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, 
Perturbation theory, applications to motion of celestial bodies. 

MA 556 (PY 556) Orbital Mechanics 3 (3-3) S 

Prerequisites: MA 301, MA 405, knowledge of elementary mechanics and computer 
programming 

Keplerian motion, iterative solutions, numerical integration, differential corrections 
and space navigation, elements of probability, least squares, sequestial estimation, 
Kalman fields. 

MA 571 (BMA 571, ST 571) Biomathematics I 3 (3-0) F 

(See biomathematics, page 263.) 

MA 572 (BMA 572, ST 572) Biomathematics II 3 (3-0) S 

(See biomathematics, page 263.) 



384 



MA 581 Special Topics 
Prerequisite: Consent of department 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MA 600 Advanced Differential Equations I 

MA 601 Advanced Differential Equations II 

MA 602 Partial Differential Equations I 

MA 603 Partial Differential Equations II 

MA 604 Topology 

MA 605 Homology and Manifolds 

MA 606 (ST 606, OR 606) Mathematical Programming II 

MA 611 Analytic Function Theory I 

MA 612 Analytic Function Theory II 

MA 613 Techniques of Complex Analysis 

MA 615 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable 

MA 617 (ST 617) Measure Theory and Advanced Probability 

MA 618 (ST 618) Measure Theory and Advanced Probability 

MA 619 (ST 619) Topics in Advanced Probability 

MA 620 Modern Algebra I 

MA 621 Modern Algebra II 

MA 622 Linear Transformations and Matrix Theory 

MA 623 Theory of Matrices and Applications 

MA 626 Algebraic Topology 

MA 628 General Topology 

MA 632 Operational Mathematics I 

MA 633 Operational Mathematics II 

MA 634 Theory of Distributions 

MA 635 Numerical Analysis III 

MA 637 DlFFERENTIABLE MANIFOLDS 

MA 641 Calculus of Variations and Theory of Optimal Control I 

MA 642 Calculus of Variations and Theory of Optimal Control II 



1-6 FS 



3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) Sum. 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) F 
3 (3-0) S 



385 



MA 647 Functional Analysis I 3 (3-0) F 

MA 648 Functional Analysis II 3 (3-0) S 

MA 655 (PY 655) Qualitative Methods in Celestial Mechanics 3 (3-0) F 

MA 656 (PY 656) Pertubation Theory in Celestial Mechanics 3 (3-0) S 

MA 661 Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis I 3 (3-0) F 

MA 662 Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis II 3 (3-0) S 

MA 681 Special Topics in Real Analysis 1-6 

MA 682 Special Topics in Complex Analysis 1-6 

MA 683 Special Topics in Algebra 1-6 

MA 684 Special Topics in Combinatorial Analysis 1-6 

MA 685 Special Topics in Numerical Analysis 1-6 

MA 686 Special Topics in Topology 1-6 

MA 687 Special Topics in Geometry 1-6 

MA 688 Special Topics in Differential Equations 1-6 

MA 689 Special Topics in Applied Mathematics 1-6 

MA 692 (IE 692, OR 692) Special Topics in Mathematical 

Programming 3 (3-0) F S Sum. 

MA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 101 Orientation (1-0) F 

New freshmen and transfer students are required to attend one hour per week 

during the fall semester. Activities center around helping the student to establish 

good study habits and to adjust to university life. Staff 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 (2-3) F S 

A beginning course designed for prospective teachers of mathematics/science at 
a secondary school level. Emphasis is given to study of different modes of instruc- 
tion and instructional strategies. Each prospective teacher is expected to design a 
lesson and teach it to students in the school to which he is assigned as a teacher 
assistant. (Offered in spring only for science education majors.) Staff 

ED 470 Methods of Teaching Mathematics 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices 
appropriate for teachers of mathematics at the secondary level. 

Messrs. Kolb, Speece, Waters, Watson 

386 



ED 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics 8 (2-15) F S 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304, senior standing, admission to teacher education 
and overall 2.0 average 

This course is intended to provide the prospective teacher with an opportunity 
to get experience in the skills and the techniques involved in teaching mathematics. 
Each student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks off campus in a selected 
center. In addition to acquiring the necessary competencies for teaching mathe- 
matics, the student teachers also will have an opportunity to become familiar with 
the total school program and to participate in as many community activities as time 
will permit during the period of student teaching. 

Messrs. Kolb, Speece, Waters, Watson 

ED 472 Developing and Selecting Teaching Materials 

in Mathematics 2( 2-0) F S 

Developing and selecting teaching materials in keeping with the new and chang- 
ing concepts of the content and emphasis in high school mathematics is essential 
for mathematics teachers. The course will follow the class discussion and demonstra- 
tion pattern. Students will study the latest instructional materials and discover or 
devise materials and aids for increasing the effectiveness of the content and instruction 
in high school mathematics. Messrs. Kolb, Speece, Waters, Watson 

ED 475 Methods of Teaching Science 3 (3-0) F 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials, curricula and evaluation practices 
appropriate for teachers of physical and natural science at the secondary level. 

Messrs. Anderson, Shannon 

ED 476 Student Teaching in Science 8 (2-15) F 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304, senior standing, admission to teacher education 
and an overall 2.0 average 

This course is intended to provide prospective teachers with an opportunity to 
get experience in the skills and techniques involved in teaching science. Each 
student during the senior year will spend 10 weeks off campus in a selected center. 
In addition to acquiring the necessary competencies for teaching science, the 
student teacher also will have an opportunity to become familiar with the total 
program and to participate in as many community activities as time will permit 
during the period of student teaching. Messrs. Anderson, Shannon 

ED 477 Developing and Selecting Teaching Materials 

in Science 2( 2-0) F 

Developing and selecting teaching materials in keeping with the new and 
changing concepts of the content and emphasis in high school science, particularly 
the experimental and laboratory approach to science teaching. Students will study 
the latest instructional materials and discover or devise materials and aids for 
increasing the effectiveness of the content and instruction in high school science 
courses. Messrs. Anderson, Shannon 

ED 495 Senior Seminar in Mathematics and 

Science Education 3 (3-0) F S 

An in-depth investigation of a teaching area in mathematics and/or science 
education by above-average department majors following their student teaching. 

Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure 

and Processes for the Teaching of 

Mathematics in the Elementary School 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in elementary education, or permission of instructor 

387 



A course designed for teachers and supervisors of mathematics in the elementary 
school. Special emphasis is given to the implications of mathematical content, 
structure, and processes in teaching arithmetic and geometry in the elementary 
school. Attention is given to the use of logic and fundamental rules of inference, 
deductive and inductive reasoning, the field properties in the sets of integers and 
rational numbers, elementary number theory, metric and non-metric geometry. 

Mr. Watson 

ED 512 Active Learning Approaches to Teaching Mathematics 

in the Elementary School 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in elementary education or permission of instructor 
A course that will stress active learning approaches to the teaching of mathematics 
in the elementary school. Special emphasis will be given to the laboratory approach 
to teaching mathematics and the use of the manipulative materials and activities 
of the Nuffield Project, the Madison Project, Dienes, Cuisenaire, and Gattegno. 
Attention will be given to research supporting the laboratory approach using 
manipulative materials in the elementary school. Suggestions will be given for 
designing activities for independent and group study and in assessing individual 
progress. Mr. Watson 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: ED 471 or equivalent 

An investigation of current problems in mathematics teaching, with emphasis 
on the areas of curriculum, methodology, facilities, supervision and research. Specific 
problems will be studied in depth. Opportunities will be provided to initiate research 
studies. 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching 3 (0-3) F S 

Prerequisite: ED 476 or equivalent 

An investigation of current problems in science teaching with emphasis on areas 
of curriculum, methodology, facilities, supervision and research. Specific problems 
will be studied in depth. Opportunities will be provided to initiate research studies. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education 3 (3-0) F 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in 

Science and Mathematics 3 (3-0) F S 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of 

Mathematics and Science 3 (3-0) S 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education Maximum 2 F S 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education Maximum 2 F S 

ED 699 Research Credits Arranged 



MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

MAE 200 Mechanical Technology in Contemporary Society 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

A presentation of the role mechanical and aerospace engineering plays in our 
present technological society with the approaches used by these engineers in solving 

388 



problems. Topics covered will include the areas of power generation, modern flight, 
and transportation vehicles. 

MAE 216 Elements of Mechanical Engineering 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EM 205, PY 208 or PY 202 

An introductory consideration of the scope and interests in mechanical engineering 
through the application and extension of chemistry, physics and mathematics to real 
engineering problems in analysis and design. 

MAE 250 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: PY 205 

Fundamental concepts underlying aerospace engineering. A basic study of the 
aerodynamics, structural, propulsion, performance and control requirements of 
flight vehicles. 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 208 or PY 202 

An introduction to the concept of energy and the laws governing the transfers and 
transformations of energy. Emphasis is placed on thermodynamic properties and First 
and Second law analysis of systems. Some basic statistical thermodynamic concepts 
are introduced and applied to the calculation of properties. 

MAE 302 Engineering Thermodynamics II 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MAE 301 

A continuation of Engineering Thermodynamics I with emphasis on the applica- 
tion of basic principles to engineering problems with systems involving mixtures of 
ideal gases, psychrometrics, nonideal gases, chemical reactions, combustion, 
chemical equilibrium, cycle analysis and one-dimensional compressible flow. 

MAE 303 Engineering Thermodynamics III 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MAE 301 

A continuation of Engineering Thermodynamics I for nonmechanical engineering 
juniors. Thermodynamics of mixtures; thermodynamics of fluid flow, heat transfer, 
vapor and gas cycles, and applications. 

MAE 305 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I 1 (0-3) F 

Corequisite: MAE 301 

An introduction to the theory and practice of measurement and experimental 
data collection. The components of the generalized measurement system are studied 
and their effects on the final result evaluated. Basic methods of data analysis as well 
as basic instrumentation for sensing, conditioning and displaying experimental 
quantities are covered. 

MAE 306 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II 1 (0-3) S 

Prerequisites: MAE 305, EE 331 

A continuation of MAE 305 into specific types of measurements. Students will 
evaluate and compare different types of instrumentation for measuring the same 
physical quantity on the basis of cost, time required, accuracy, etc. 

MAE 307 Energy and Energy Transformations 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MA 201, PY 212 

Energy transformation as permitted by the First Law and limited by the Second 
Law. Properties of ideal gases and actual gases; properties of vapors. Vapor power 
cycles; vapor refrigerating cycles, gas cycles for internal combustion engines and gas 
turbines. Elements of heat transfer. 



389 



MAE 315 Dynamics of Machines 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MAE 216, EM 305 

A rational application of dynamics to the analysis of machines and mechanical 
devices to determine the motions resulting from applied loads and the forces and 
inputs required to produce specified motions. 

MAE 316 Strength of Mechanical Components 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: EM 205, MAT 201 

Stress, strain and deformation analysis of mechanical components and their 
strength determination based on material behavior under static and dynamic operat- 
ing conditions. Applications to basic machine components. 

MAE 355 Aerodynamics I 4 (3-3) F 

Prerequisites: MAE 250, MA 301 

Introductory concepts of perfect fluid theory and incompressible boundary layers 
with application to the computation of the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, 
wings and flight vehicle configurations. 

MAE 356 Aerodymanics II 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisites: MAE 355, MAE 301 

Introductory concepts of thermodynamics, compressible fluid flow and compressible 
boundary layers with application to the computation of the areodynamic charac- 
teristics of airfoils, wings and flight vehicle configurations at high speed. 

MAE 361 Aerospace Vehicle Performance 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MAE 250, MA 301, EM 305 

An application of the principles of dynamics and aerodynamics to the problem of 
determining the performance of both airplanes and space vehicles. Includes the 
elements of orbital mechanics and dynamics of boost into and reentry from orbit. 
For aircraft, methods are presented for the calculation of airplane performance in 
level, gliding and climbing flight as well as take-off and landing performance. 

MAE 365 Air-Breathing Propulsion Systems 4 (3-3) S 

Prerequisites: MAE 355, MAE 301 

Introduction to one-dimensional internal flow of compressible fluids and to com- 
bustion and thermochemistry problems. Application of these processes to air- 
breathing aircraft propulsion systems. Performance analysis of components and 
complete propulsion systems. 

MAE 371 Aerospace Vehicle Structures I 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisites: MAE 250, EM 205 

Introduction to the theory and concepts required for the analysis and design of 
flight vehicle structural members. Properties and selection of materials; methods of 
analysis for axial, torsional, flexural and transverse shear loadings of typical flight 
structure members. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAE 401 Energy Conversion 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisite: MAE 302 

Applications of the principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer 
and combustion to power generation. Both the conventional and direct energy 
conversion methods are studied as to the principles involved and the feasibility and 
limitations of each method. Consideration is given to the economics of power 
generation. 



390 



MAE 402 Heat and Mass Transfer 3 (3-0) F S 

Prerequisites: MAE 302, MA 301 

A study of the fundamental relationships of steady and transient heat transfer by 
conduction, convection, radiation and during changes of phase: mass transfer by 
diffusion and convection, simultaneous mass and heat transfer. 

MAE 403 Air Conditioning 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MAE 302 

A fundamental study of summer and winter air conditioning including temperature, 
humidity, air velocity and distribution. 

MAE 404 Refrigeration 3 (3-0) S 

Prerequisite: MAE 302 

A thermodynamic analysis of the simple, compound, centrifugal and multiple 
effect compression systems, the steam jet system and the absorption system of 
refrigeration. 

MAE 405 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III 1 (0-3) F 

Prerequisite: MAE 306 

The final course in the undergraduate mechanical laboratory sequence which 
exposes the student to case studies in experimental engineering, and provides 
him the opportunity to select instrumentation and design a complete experimental 
set up for a specific problem. 

MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric 

Pollution 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisite: MAE 301 or equivalent 

Combustion calculations and analysis of particulate emission and gases from 
industrial and utility power stations burning various types of fuel. State and Federal 
Pollution codes, requirements for compliance and enforcement. Calculations and 
design of industrial equipment to combat pollution. Utilization of waste products 
from industrial plants. 

MAE 411 Mechanical Design I 3 (3-0) F or S 

Prerequisites: MAE 315, MAE 316 

Application of the engineering and materials sciences to the analysis and design 
of mechanical components including screws and fasteners, antifriction and 
journal bearings, springs, gears, shafts, clutches, breaks and couplings, etc. 

MAE 415 Mechanical Engineering Analysis 3 (3-0) F 

Prerequisites: MAE 302, MAE 315, MAE 316, EE 331 

Consideration of a logi